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Doctor Sleep (2013)

by Stephen King

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The Shining (2)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
6,5293151,277 (4.03)265
"Stephen King returns to the characters and territory of one of his most popular novels ever, The Shining, in this instantly riveting novel about the now middle-aged Dan Torrance (the boy protagonist of The Shining) and the very special twelve-year-old girl he must save from a tribe of murderous paranormals. On highways across America, a tribe of people called The True Knot travel in search of sustenance. They look harmless-- mostly old, lots of polyester, and married to their RVs. But as Dan Torrance knows, and spunky twelve-year-old Abra Stone learns, The True Knot are quasi-immortal, living off the 'steam' that children with the 'shining' produce when they are slowly tortured to death. Haunted by the inhabitants of the Overlook Hotel where he spent one horrific childhood year, Dan has been drifting for decades, desperate to shed his father's legacy of despair, alcoholism, and violence. Finally, he settles in a New Hampshire town, an AA community that sustains him, and a job at a nursing home where his remnant 'shining' power provides the crucial final comfort to the dying. Aided by a prescient cat, he becomes 'Doctor Sleep.' Then Dan meets the evanescent Abra Stone, and it is her spectacular gift, the brightest shining ever seen, that reignites Dan's own demons and summons him to a battle for Abra's soul and survival"--From publisher's web site.… (more)
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» See also 265 mentions

English (299)  Swedish (2)  Italian (2)  German (2)  French (1)  Dutch (1)  Spanish (1)  Catalan (1)  Danish (1)  Finnish (1)  All languages (311)
Showing 1-5 of 299 (next | show all)
Although I was initially dismissive of Doctor Sleep as the follow-up to one of Stephen King's most well-known classics, my surprisingly positive impression of Mike Flanagan's 2019 adaptation finally encouraged me to look into King's own version of the story. And it certainly did not disappoint.

As King himself briefly mentions in the Author's Note, returning to one of your finest works is always prone to leave people divided. There will be those unhappy with the directions the author takes for some of the returning characters; there will be those criticizing the author for returning to popular material as a way of increasing sales numbers rather than creating an original story, as a quick cash-grab or to jump upon the nostalgia train that so many creators, be it films or novels, love to take a ride on. The thing is, what King achieves in Doctor Sleep is just that: an original story, with the backdrop of The Shining hovering over every page, but never enforcing its identity on this novel. While Doctor Sleep would almost certainly not exist without The Shining, it's credit of King's strength as a storyteller that this novel would nevertheless work on its own without having read the aforementioned masterwork.

As a fan of The Shining, both the novel and the completely different, but uniquely great adaptation by Stanley Kubrick, I got a lot of enjoyment out of reading Doctor Sleep. I understand where the opponents are coming from here, but King has a point when he says: "[p]eople change. The man who wrote Doctor Sleep is very different from the well-meaning alcoholic who wrote The Shining, but both remain interested in the same thing: telling a kickass story." That's always been what King does best, and in that regard, Doctor Sleep truly is far from a disappointment. ( )
  Councillor3004 | Sep 1, 2022 |
meh. ( )
1 vote J.Flux | Aug 13, 2022 |
Okay, I know my more literary side says this can't be that good, but it is. I could go on and on about why this might be King's best book ever and why, but it certainly is his best in decades. I have contended, against my more literati friends, that King is not just a great horror writer but a great American writer. [b:The Shining|11588|The Shining (The Shining, #1)|Stephen King|https://d202m5krfqbpi5.cloudfront.net/books/1353277730s/11588.jpg|849585] will still be read 100 years from now. If people think [a:Garrison Keillor|2014|Garrison Keillor|https://d202m5krfqbpi5.cloudfront.net/authors/1259697704p2/2014.jpg], and I do, is a great American writer, then King certainly stands taller than him. Best ending King ever delivered. We're not worthy.

( )
  Gumbywan | Jun 24, 2022 |
What can I say? Uncle Steve is the Master of Horror for a reason. Glad to get some closure as far as what happened to Danny Torrance after the Shining. Also I absolutely loved the new character, Abra Stone, she was awesome. ( )
  awesomejen2 | Jun 21, 2022 |
My kids bought me this sequel to The Shining for Christmas. It was a great read seeing what happened to Dan in King's mind after all these years. With The Shining being one of the most known King books, it was great to read this. Definitely a good read, if you are a King fan. Should have reread The Shining first though as there is so much I had forgotten from the book. Love the new characters and how Dan has turned out. Thanks Stephen for the read. ( )
  KyleneJones | Apr 25, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 299 (next | show all)
What are those virtues? First, King is a well-trusted guide to the underworld. His readers will follow him through any door marked “Danger: Keep Out” (or, in more literary terms, “Abandon All Hope Ye Who Enter Here”), because they know that not only will he give them a thorough tour of the inferno — no gore left unspilled, no shriek left unshrieked — he will also get them out alive. As the Sibyl of Cumae puts it to Aeneas, it’s easy to go to hell, but returning from it is the hard part. She can say that because she’s been there; and, in a manner of speaking — our intuition tells us — so has King.

Second, King is right at the center of an American literary taproot that goes all the way down: to the Puritans and their belief in witches, to Hawthorne, to Poe, to Melville, to the Henry James of “The Turn of the Screw,” and then to later exemplars like Ray Bradbury. In the future, I predict, theses will be written on such subjects as “American Puritan Neo-Surrealism in ‘The Scarlet Letter’ and ‘The Shining,’ ” and “Melville’s Pequod and King’s Overlook Hotel as Structures That Encapsulate American History.”
added by ozzer | editNew York Times, Margaret Atwood (Sep 19, 2013)
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Stephen Kingprimary authorall editionscalculated
Levinsen, JakobTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Patton, WillNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
We stood at the turning point. Half-measures availed us nothing.
- The Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous
If we were to live, we had to be free of anger. [It is] the dubious luxury of normal men and women.
- The Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous
Dedication
When I was playing my primitive band of rhythm guitar with a group called the Rock Bottom Remainders, Warren Zevon used to gig with us. Warren loved gray t-shirts and movies like Kingdom of the Spiders. He insisted I sing lead on his signature tune, "Werewolves of London", during the encore portion of our shows. I said I was not worthy. He insisted that I was. "Key of G", Warren told me, "and howl like you mean it. Most important of all, play like Keith."
I'll never be able to play like Keith Richards, but I always did my best, and with Warren beside me, matching me note for note and laughing his fool head off, I always had a blast.
Warren, this howl is for you, wherever you are. I miss you, buddy.
First words
On the second day of December in a year when a Georgia peanut farmer was doing business in the White House, one of Colorado's great resort hotels burned to the ground.
Quotations
The True's towns, with colorful names like Dry Bend, Jerusalem's Lot, Oree, and Sidewinder, were safe havens, but they never stayed in those places for long; mostly they were migratory.
"There are other worlds than these."
The one thing of which Dan was sure was that there were no coincidences.
Life was a wheel, its only job was to turn, and it always came back to where it had started.
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Disambiguation notice
Please distinguish Stephen King's novel, Doctor Sleep (2013), from Madison Smartt Bell's novel of the same title (1991).
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Information from the Italian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
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Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
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Wikipedia in English (3)

"Stephen King returns to the characters and territory of one of his most popular novels ever, The Shining, in this instantly riveting novel about the now middle-aged Dan Torrance (the boy protagonist of The Shining) and the very special twelve-year-old girl he must save from a tribe of murderous paranormals. On highways across America, a tribe of people called The True Knot travel in search of sustenance. They look harmless-- mostly old, lots of polyester, and married to their RVs. But as Dan Torrance knows, and spunky twelve-year-old Abra Stone learns, The True Knot are quasi-immortal, living off the 'steam' that children with the 'shining' produce when they are slowly tortured to death. Haunted by the inhabitants of the Overlook Hotel where he spent one horrific childhood year, Dan has been drifting for decades, desperate to shed his father's legacy of despair, alcoholism, and violence. Finally, he settles in a New Hampshire town, an AA community that sustains him, and a job at a nursing home where his remnant 'shining' power provides the crucial final comfort to the dying. Aided by a prescient cat, he becomes 'Doctor Sleep.' Then Dan meets the evanescent Abra Stone, and it is her spectacular gift, the brightest shining ever seen, that reignites Dan's own demons and summons him to a battle for Abra's soul and survival"--From publisher's web site.

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