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102 Minutes: The Untold Story of the Fight to Survive Inside the Twin Towers (2005)

by Jim DWYER, Kevin FLYNN (Author)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,3635013,708 (4.12)71
History. Politics. Nonfiction. HTML:

"102 Minutes does for the September 11 catastrophe what Walter Lord did for the Titanic in his masterpiece, A Night to Remember . . . Searing, poignant, and utterly compelling."??Rick Atkinson, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of An Army at Dawn
Hailed upon publication as an instant classic, the critically acclaimed New York Times bestseller and National Book Award Finalist for Nonfiction is now available in a revised edition to honor the anniversary of the attacks of September 11, 2001.
At 8:46 a.m. that morning, fourteen thouosand people were inside the World Trade Center just starting their workdays, but over the next 102 minutes, each would become part of a drama for the ages. Of the millions of words written about this wrenching day, most were told from the outside looking in. New York Times reporters Jim Dwyer and Kevin Flynn draw on hundreds of interviews with rescuers and survivors, thousands of pages of oral histories, and countless phone, e-mail, and emergency radio transcripts to tell the story of September 11 from the inside looking out.
Dwyer and Flynn have woven an epic and unforgettable account of the struggle, determination, and grace of the ordinary men and women who made 102 minutes count as never before.
102 Minutes is a 2005 National Book Award Finalist for Nonfiction.… (more)

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» See also 71 mentions

English (46)  Swedish (1)  Danish (1)  All languages (48)
Showing 1-5 of 46 (next | show all)
A well-written, detailed account of the time period between the airplanes striking the Towers and the horrific collapse. It is an emotional read that made you feel for the victims and the families who searched for them. ( )
  Micareads | Jun 21, 2022 |
A must read - gut wrenching, powerful and heartbreaking. ( )
  susan.h.schofield | Aug 28, 2021 |
This book tells the stories of the people who were inside the towers on 9-11. It's a raw record of the day and what people saw, did and experienced.

Certain details in this book have lingered over the years. For example some firefighters actually reached the fire that was raging on the upper stories. One elevator remained operational in the south tower after the second plane crashed into it; and that elevator took a few firefighters up to the 40th floor. Battalion Chief Orio J. Palmer climbed another 38 floors to the impact zone, arriving at the lobby on the 78th floor by 9:51 a.m. Their tower collapsed eight minute later.

A large crowd of firefighters, some of them suffering from chest pains and the like under loads of 60 pounds or more, were still resting on the 19th floor of the north tower as the last of the interviewed survivors came down.

While reading "102 Minutes," I recalled two books especially: John Hersey's "Hiroshima," which reconstructs that bombing from interviews with six survivors; and Walter Lord's "A Night To Remember," the definitive account of Titanic's sinking. There are many more similarities with Lord's account -- particularly the attempt, by a non-participant, to keep an eye on hundreds of personal stories. ( )
1 vote krosero | Jul 10, 2021 |
Excellently written, filled with many tidbits and facts that I did not know in my previous readings of the subject.

I confess that the descriptions of those in the situation of trying to find a way out from floors above the point of entry of the planes that hit the tower, was so difficult to read.

Despite the sadness and sheer horror that those trapped inside the south, and north towers, I recommend this one!
  Whisper1 | Nov 26, 2020 |
This is a meticulous read, and difficult from the perspective of the subject matter. Hard to be completely analytical as you are taken inside the trade centers where thousands of people tried to fend for themselves to survive. But I think this is a very important book, one I discovered by accident and am happy I did. It dissects the construction of the trade center from an engineering and building code perspective, and then it dissects the strengths and weaknesses in emergency response operations that led to how things played out on Sept. 11. All of this is done while providing profiles of some of the people who were in the trade centers that day, using various records and interviews to tell their stories. Some lived and some did not. Worth reading for the lessons learned on multiple fronts. ( )
  jjpseattle | Aug 2, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 46 (next | show all)
I can't imagine there will be another act of terrorism that will terrify us the way the attack on the World Trade Center did. In "102 Minutes" Dwyer and Flynn have done a remarkable job of resisting the temptations of hindsight. They have recreated the moments in which we lost our capacity for that kind of surprise and given us a fitting tribute to the people caught up in one of the great dramas of our time. And for people still haunted by the events of that day, reading "102 Minutes" provides a cathartic release.
 

» Add other authors (6 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
DWYER, JimAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
FLYNN, KevinAuthormain authorall editionsconfirmed
DALÉN, HansTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McLarty, RonNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
PFLÜGER, FriedrichTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
For Mary, Maggie, and Kevin - KF
For Julia Sullivan and Sheila Carmody and all who travel with them - JD
First words
First into the office on the 89th floor of 1 World Trade Center, as always, Dianne DeFontes shut the door behind her, then locked it with a bolt that slid up and down, into floor and ceiling.
Quotations
By 9:02 the boomerang of alarm and assurance had driven Stanley Praimnath from the 81st floor to the lobby, then back again to his office. The phone was ringing as he returned, and he picked it up to hear the voice of a colleague from Chicago, urgently inquiring after his well-being. "Are you okay?" the woman asked Praimnath. "Yes, I'm fine," he assured her. "Stan, are you watching the monitor-are you watching the news to see what is going on?" she asked. "Yes," he assured her again. "I'm fine." As he spoke, Praimnath spun his seat around so he was facing in the direction of the window, though he was not staring out. His window looked south over New York Harbor and the Statue of Liberty, the light trails of froth cut in the slate colored water by the stready traffic of ships and tugs and ferries. From the corner of his eye, he glimpsed an unfamiliar shape on the horizon. Praimnath turned slightly, to look square out the window. An airplane. It was heading toward his office, toward his window, it seemed. He could see the red and blue marking and the letter U as it approached. He dived under his desk, screaming to God, as his colleague in Chicago listened on the phone and watched the television screen in horror. In the length of a drawn breath, the ceiling collapsed. The time was 9:02:59 A.M., and United Airlines Flight 175 now plunged through the south tower of the World Trade Center, including the room where Stanley Praimnath had jumped beneath his desk. The plane had banked slightly at the last second, its wingspan running diagonally across nine floors, from 77 to 85. The Mizuho/Fuji office was at the center of it. Praimnath's room was torn to bits. Wires and cubicles and drywall slumped into a tangle at once sinister and silent. The wing of the jet was jammed into a door; twenty feet from where Praimnath, still alive, huddled beneath his desk.
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Wikipedia in English (3)

History. Politics. Nonfiction. HTML:

"102 Minutes does for the September 11 catastrophe what Walter Lord did for the Titanic in his masterpiece, A Night to Remember . . . Searing, poignant, and utterly compelling."??Rick Atkinson, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of An Army at Dawn
Hailed upon publication as an instant classic, the critically acclaimed New York Times bestseller and National Book Award Finalist for Nonfiction is now available in a revised edition to honor the anniversary of the attacks of September 11, 2001.
At 8:46 a.m. that morning, fourteen thouosand people were inside the World Trade Center just starting their workdays, but over the next 102 minutes, each would become part of a drama for the ages. Of the millions of words written about this wrenching day, most were told from the outside looking in. New York Times reporters Jim Dwyer and Kevin Flynn draw on hundreds of interviews with rescuers and survivors, thousands of pages of oral histories, and countless phone, e-mail, and emergency radio transcripts to tell the story of September 11 from the inside looking out.
Dwyer and Flynn have woven an epic and unforgettable account of the struggle, determination, and grace of the ordinary men and women who made 102 minutes count as never before.
102 Minutes is a 2005 National Book Award Finalist for Nonfiction.

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