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The Long Goodbye (1953)

by Raymond Chandler

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Philip Marlowe (6)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
4,557991,857 (4.16)1 / 188
Down-and-out drunk Terry Lennox has a problem- his millionaire wife is dead and he needs to get out of LA fast. So he turns to his only friend in the world- Philip Marlowe, Private Investigator. He's willing to help a man down on his luck, but later, Lennox commits suicide in Mexico and things start to turn nasty. Marlowe finds himself drawn into a sordid crowd of adulterers and alcoholics in LA's Idle Valley, where the rich are suffering one big suntanned hangover. Marlowe is sure Lennox didn't kill his wife, but how many more stiffs will turn up before he gets to the truth?… (more)
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» See also 188 mentions

English (96)  Dutch (1)  Italian (1)  Spanish (1)  All languages (99)
Showing 1-5 of 96 (next | show all)
"The bar was pretty empty. Three booths down a couple of sharpies were selling each other pieces of Twentieth Century Fox, using double arm gestures instead of money. They had a telephone on the table between them and every two or three minutes they would play the match game to see who called Zanuck with a hot idea. They were young, dark, eager, and full of vitality. They put as much muscular activity into a telephone conversation that I would put into carrying a fat man up four flights of stairs. There was a sad fellow over on a bar stool talking to the bartender, who was polishing a glass and listening with that plastic smile people wear when they are trying not to scream. The customer was middle-aged, handsomely dressed and drunk. He wanted to talk and he couldn't have stopped even if he hadn't really wanted to talk. He was polite and friendly and when I heard him he didn't seem to slur his words much, but you knew that he got up on the bottle and only let go of it when he fell asleep at night. He would be like that for the rest of his life, and that was what his life was. You would never know how he got that way because even if he told you it would not be the truth. At the very best a distorted memory of the truth as he knew it. There is a sad man like that in every quiet bar in the world." ( )
  mortalfool | Jul 10, 2021 |
The sixth book in the Philip Marlowe series, "The Long Goodbye" is considerably longer than its predecessors, and stands out as quite different in terms of how the story develops. Written by an older Chandler, it abandons the standard rhythms of the series (and a lot of the private eye mystery-solving tropes) in favor of a more leisurely pace and a lot of pontificating about Los Angeles and life in general - perhaps a bit too much. It's overly long, and misses some opportunities to complicate the story, with the result being that I found myself expecting more from characters who ultimately didn't affect the narrative much. It's great to see the viewpoint of both author and character progress throughout the series, though I definitely wouldn't start with this one, and I think "The Little Sister" does a better job of combining the plot twists and philosophizing that make Marlowe so enjoyable to read. ( )
  greggmaxwellparker | Apr 6, 2021 |
If you drink as much whiskey as is consumed in this book, within the time it takes to read the book, you'll be fucked. ( )
  EugenioNegro | Mar 17, 2021 |
I was a little disappointed by the last Chandler novel I read (Farewell, My Lovely), but this one is much better. The characters are all sharply drawn, and Chandler's plotting is actually really interesting - the winding road that Marlowe takes to arrive at his solution is really fascinating and sometimes seems like it's veered away from the original plot entirely. I think the ending slumps a little - the last two chapters could probably be excised entirely without hurting the book at all - but overall really good. ( )
  skolastic | Feb 2, 2021 |
blackmail leads to murder as does craziness ( )
  ritaer | Jan 19, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 96 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (21 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Chandler, Raymondprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ahmavaara, EeroTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bakema, BenTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brooks, BobCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Costa, Flávio Moreira daTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Deaver, JefferyIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fischer, PeterTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gould, ElliottNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Grandfield, GeoffIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hérisson, JanineTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lara, José AntonioTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
López Muñoz, José LuisTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nyytäjä, KaleviTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Oddera, BrunoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Papp, ZoltánTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Robillot, HenriTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wollschläger, HansTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Георгиева, ЖечкаTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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The first time I laid eyes on Terry Lennox he was drunk in a Rolls-Royce Silver Wraith outside the terrace of The Dancers.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Down-and-out drunk Terry Lennox has a problem- his millionaire wife is dead and he needs to get out of LA fast. So he turns to his only friend in the world- Philip Marlowe, Private Investigator. He's willing to help a man down on his luck, but later, Lennox commits suicide in Mexico and things start to turn nasty. Marlowe finds himself drawn into a sordid crowd of adulterers and alcoholics in LA's Idle Valley, where the rich are suffering one big suntanned hangover. Marlowe is sure Lennox didn't kill his wife, but how many more stiffs will turn up before he gets to the truth?

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Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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