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Count Zero by William Gibson
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Count Zero (1986)

by William Gibson

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Sprawl (2)

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5,787431,106 (3.84)68
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» See also 68 mentions

English (40)  Romanian (1)  Catalan (1)  Polish (1)  All languages (43)
Showing 1-5 of 40 (next | show all)
This is not a traditional sequel to Neuromancer in that they mostly have a shared setting and a minor character or two appear in both. THat's okay, the story still works.
There are four narrators that alternate chapters. It takes the first third of the boopk for Gibson to make clear how the four disparate characters how fit together and during this time I had to put up with one narrator that I didn't really like. Later, when he is more involved with the others, we get to see that he is not necessarily a reliable narrator in some aspects of his story, and that does indeed make him a better character. ( )
  Eric.Cone | Sep 28, 2017 |
I don't know why it took me so long to read the second in the Sprawl trilogy, but I finally got around to it. I enjoyed it a lot, but beware the dated and cringe-inducing stereotypes which shape the portrayal of the black characters. Gibson does his usual thing of having multiple storylines and POVs which eventually come together at the end in a satisfying way. The matrix idea is more detailed than in Neuromancer, and we get a glimpse of life outside the Sprawl. Also as usual, Gibson throws you into the action without much explanation, so hang on during the first 75 or so pages and you'll eventually find your bearings. ( )
  Sunita_p | Jul 18, 2017 |
( read this but don't remember anything about it ) ( )
  Baku-X | Jan 10, 2017 |
This turned out to be my least favorite of the Sprawl trilogy. However, it is--like all of Gibson's work--compelling and easy to read. He investigates power and class with slick prose. But what caught my attention was the way he uses voodou; it is about "getting things done" with "street religion" in a technological world.
  Marjorie_Jensen | Nov 12, 2015 |
It's funny, because I remember when I read this the first time, all sorts of incomprehension and mistakes jumbled together as I forced my way through. I loved the writing. I loved the writing, the setting, the sci-fi cool, the characters and the three intertwining plots, but in the end I barely had a clue what was going on. The Maas biotech stuff I got, sure, another high-tech maguffin, but the loa and their horses, despite having read Neuromancer and having it all laid out quite clearly in the book itself, I just couldn't work out what they were. The identity of the Boxmaker puzzled me, too. I think I assumed it was some sort of cruel mockery directed at Art and human presumption and pretensions. But Gibson was never anywhere near as cynical as cyberpunk the genre was supposed to be, even though the cynicism of the eighties forms part of the texture of the Sprawl novels. Instead, it is strange and lonely and brave and beautiful. 'My song is of time and distance. The sadness is in you.'

Count Zero is carefully plotted, precision engineered, fine-tuned, sleek and streetwise. Three plots: the mercenary Turner who specialises in corporate defections; Marly the art dealer ruined by scandal in Paris, and Bobby the Count, a would-be cowboy hit by lethal ice on his first run and saved by... something. Their stories turn around subterfuge and betrayal, the all-enveloping power of the monstrously rich and the strange interface of voodoo and cyberspace. It's a wild, thrilling ride, and it's a wonder to me that I can grasp now what eluded me then. ( )
  Nigel_Quinlan | Oct 21, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 40 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (12 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
William Gibsonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Berry, RickCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Häilä, ArtoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stone, SteveCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zinoni, DelioTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Quiero hacer contigo/
lo que la primavera/
hace con los cerezos - Neruda
COUNT ZERO INTERRUPT - on receiving an interrupt, decrement the counter to zero.
Dedication
For my D
First words
They set a slamhound on Turner's trail in New Delhi, slotted it to his pheromones and the color of his hair.
Quotations
"The street tries to find its own uses for things, Mr Turner." [Chiba medic: 69]
As she walked from the Louvre, she seemed to sense some articulated structure shifting to accommodate her course through the city. The waiter would be merely a part of the thing, one limb, a probe or palp. The whole would be larger, much larger. How could she have imagined that it would be possible to live, to move, in the unnatural field of Virek's wealth without suffering distortion? Virek had taken her up, in all her misery, and had rotated her through all the monstrous, invisible stresses of his money, and she had been changed. Of course, she thought, of course: It moves around me constantly, watchful and invisible, the vast and subtle mechanism of Herr Virek's surveillance. [Marly: 73]
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
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Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Original language
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References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Count Zero's world of the Sprawl is closer to the connected world of today than Gibson's earlier work Neuromancer.
Haiku summary
Count Zero, hacker
Hung out lots in cyberspace
It was newly formed  
(pickupsticks)

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0441117732, Mass Market Paperback)

Turner, corporate mercenary, wakes in a reconstructed body, a beautiful woman by his side. Then Hosaka Corporation reactivates him for a mission more dangerous than the one he's recovering from: Maas-Neotek's chief of R&D is defecting. Turner is the one assigned to get him out intact, along with the biochip he's perfected. But this proves to be of supreme interest to certain other parties--some of whom aren't remotely human.

Bobby Newmark is entirely human: a rustbelt data-hustler totally unprepared for what comes his way when the defection triggers war in cyberspace. With voodoo on the Net and a price on his head, Newmark thinks he's only trying to get out alive. A stylish, streetsmart, frighteningly probable parable of the future and sequel to Neuromancer

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:02 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

Turner, corporate mercenary, wakes in a reconstructed body, a beautiful woman by his side. Then Hosaka Corporation reactivates him for a mission more dangerous than the one he's recovering from: Maas-Neotek's chief of R&D is defecting. Turner is the one assigned to get him out intact, along with the biochip he's perfected. But this proves to be of supreme interest to certain other parties--some of whom aren't remotely human. Bobby Newmark is entirely human: a rustbelt data-hustler totally unprepared for what comes his way when the defection triggers war in cyberspace. With voodoo on the Net and a price on his head, Newmark thinks he's only trying to get out alive. Untilhe meets the angel. A stylish, streetsmart, frighteningly probable parable of the future.… (more)

» see all 4 descriptions

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