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98.6 Degrees: The Art of Keeping Your Ass Alive

by Cody Lundin

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
259679,411 (3.62)2
Cody Lundin, director of theAboriginal Living Skills School in Prescott, Arizona, shares hisown brand of wilderness wisdom in this highly anticipated newbook on commonsense, modern survival skills for the backcountry,the backyard, or the highway. This is the ultimate book on how tostay alive-based on the principle of keeping the body's coretemperature at a lively 98.6 degrees. In his entertaining and informative style, Cody stresses thata human can live without food for weeks and without water forabout three days or so. But if the body's core temperature dipsmuch below or above the 98.6 degree mark, a person can literallydie within hours. It is a concept that many don't take seriouslyor even consider, but knowing what to do to maintain a safe coretemperature when lost in a blizzard or in the desert could saveyour life. Lundin delivers the message with wit, rebellioushumor, and plenty of backcountry expertise. Watch naturalist Cody Lundin on "DualSurvival" as he uses many of the same skills and techniquestaught in his book: 98.6 Degrees: The Art of Keeping Your AssAlive. As seen in the 10-part series "Dual Survival" on The Discovery Channel! Cody Lundinand his AboriginalLiving Skills School have been featured in dozens of national andinternational media sources, including Dateline NBC, CBS News,USA Today, The Donny and Marie Show, and CBC Radio One in Canada,as well as on the cover of Backpacker magazine. When not teachingfor his own school, he is an adjunct faculty member at YavapaiCollege and a faculty member at the Ecosa Institute. Cody is theonly person in Arizona licensed to catch fish with his hands, andlives in a passive solar earth home sixty miles from Prescott,Arizona.… (more)
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Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
Empecé el libro esperando encontrar multitud de historias de gente que había sobrevivido a situaciones difíciles (avalanchas, averías de coche en el desierto, perderse en mitad de una ventisca...) y resulta que este libro es tan solo una larga serie de consejos sobre cómo prepararse por si sucede lo peor. El libro está muy entretenido, y llega por momentos a detalles increíbles, como la tasa de pérdida de calor por evaporación (medida en BTUs) de la lana frente al algodón, o el índice glucémico óptimo de los alimentos que debemos llevar.
Hay un par de grandes secciones sobre ropa, kit de supervivencia y botiquín. Y el resto es repetir de muy variadas maneras lo que podríamos llamar sentido común:

Avisa a dónde vas
Aprende a hacerte ver
Aprende cómo regular tu temperatura
Aprende a usar un mapa
y varios consejos más que hay que hacer antes de encontrarnos perdidos en la nada.

Un libro entretenido, aunque demasiado especializado para lo que yo buscaba. ( )
  Remocpi | Apr 22, 2020 |
This is an overview or tip guide for outdoor survival.

For the most part it is fairly easy to read. In some places, the tone does seem to be condescending but this could also be an attempt at humor. Without knowing the writer, in a text format, these types of humor are rather difficult.

Little to no references for fact checking or additional reading are left which is heartily disappointing.

Numerous references are dated and/or regional which may cause confusion to outsiders.

There are a number of good tips scattered within the pages though.

Overall, an adequate read. ( )
  catya77 | Dec 26, 2013 |
Besides the dedication to "all Beings of Light," living "within a conscious understanding of our true Selves" and his gratitude for "all the Ascended and Cosmic Ones, to all the Archangels, Archeia, and angels, elementals, and Elohim"... and his characters "Elvis Parsley, Willy Nilly" and others, by the time you weed through all his flakey or cutesie fluff content, the meat on the bone is practical and useful, but lost. By three chapters in, I truly felt like I had wasted my time. The title suggests "How to survive Fear, Panic, ad the Biggest Outdoor Killers," but my initial survival was against falling asleep while reading this kum-by-yah, lets all hold hands and thank mother earth tripe. Just read page 209, and you've saved yourself $16.95 and the time spent reading it... OR... Watch your core temp, adequate water, stay dry, tell people where you are going, check your transportation, take a survival kit, know how to signal for rescue, don't take unnecessary chances, rest. DONE. ( )
1 vote CultDoctor | Aug 8, 2010 |
2010-07-17 19:54:00
  vorce | Jul 17, 2010 |
2010-07-17 19:54:00
  vorce | Jul 17, 2010 |
Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
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Cody Lundin, director of theAboriginal Living Skills School in Prescott, Arizona, shares hisown brand of wilderness wisdom in this highly anticipated newbook on commonsense, modern survival skills for the backcountry,the backyard, or the highway. This is the ultimate book on how tostay alive-based on the principle of keeping the body's coretemperature at a lively 98.6 degrees. In his entertaining and informative style, Cody stresses thata human can live without food for weeks and without water forabout three days or so. But if the body's core temperature dipsmuch below or above the 98.6 degree mark, a person can literallydie within hours. It is a concept that many don't take seriouslyor even consider, but knowing what to do to maintain a safe coretemperature when lost in a blizzard or in the desert could saveyour life. Lundin delivers the message with wit, rebellioushumor, and plenty of backcountry expertise. Watch naturalist Cody Lundin on "DualSurvival" as he uses many of the same skills and techniquestaught in his book: 98.6 Degrees: The Art of Keeping Your AssAlive. As seen in the 10-part series "Dual Survival" on The Discovery Channel! Cody Lundinand his AboriginalLiving Skills School have been featured in dozens of national andinternational media sources, including Dateline NBC, CBS News,USA Today, The Donny and Marie Show, and CBC Radio One in Canada,as well as on the cover of Backpacker magazine. When not teachingfor his own school, he is an adjunct faculty member at YavapaiCollege and a faculty member at the Ecosa Institute. Cody is theonly person in Arizona licensed to catch fish with his hands, andlives in a passive solar earth home sixty miles from Prescott,Arizona.

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