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Rosemary's Baby (1967)

by Ira Levin, Ira Levin

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Rosemary's Baby (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3,7281032,509 (3.79)232
Rosemary Woodhouse and her struggling actor husband Guy move into the Bramford, an old New York City apartment building with an ominous reputation and mostly elderly residents. Neighbors Roman and Minnie Castavet soon come nosing around to welcome the Woodhouses to the building, and despite Rosemary's reservations about their eccentricity and the weird noises that she keeps hearing, her husband takes a special shine to them. Shortly after Guy lands a plum Broadway role, Rosemary becomes pregnant, and the Castavets start taking a special interest in her welfare. As the sickened Rosemary becomes increasingly isolated, she begins to suspect that the Castavets' circle is not what it seems.… (more)
  1. 41
    The Sentinel by Jeffrey Konvitz (jseger9000)
    jseger9000: The stories are quite different, but the books share similar themes. Both books are '70's religious shockers about a young woman moving into a new apartment, set in New York.
  2. 10
    The Exorcist by William Peter Blatty (sturlington)
  3. 00
    The Mephisto Waltz by Fred Mustard Stewart (SomeGuyInVirginia)
  4. 00
    The Sand Men by Christopher Fowler (ShelfMonkey)
  5. 00
    The Case Against Satan by Ray Russell (SomeGuyInVirginia)
  6. 01
    Son of Rosemary by Ira Levin (KayCliff)
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» See also 232 mentions

English (95)  Danish (3)  French (2)  Dutch (1)  Italian (1)  Hebrew (1)  All languages (103)
Showing 1-5 of 95 (next | show all)
I've changed my rating twice while typing out this review... My first thought was that I wanted to like it more than I did. I mean, the beginning was slow and boring but once it got going, I couldn't stop listening. Yes, it's from the 60s so there were plenty of patting the nice, young woman on the head and the husband laying down the law, and racist descriptions, of course.

Rosemary ended up being much stronger than I figured she would be. Sort of. I mean, until the very end. I need to live with the story a bit more. I won't lie, I'm tempted to read the next book in the series.

I listened to the Audible version and the sound quality left a lot to be desired. Mia Farrow's acting and voices were good but it sounded like it was recorded a few decades ago. How about some clean up there, Audible?

Now I need to watch the movie because I don't remember anything about it at all. ( )
  amcheri | May 25, 2021 |
He has His Father’s eyes.

Man, what a great line. Levin ruins it a bit later by talking about how cute his little demon claws are in his baby mittens but that would have been a killer line to end on. Of course then I would have been robbed of Rosemary deciding that everybody who had been gaslighting her for months—especially her pos husband—could stuff it because she’s going to be the mother to her baby and his name is Andrew, douchebags, not Adrian. I’ve heard that the sequel is pretty shit but if it was all about Rosemary getting grand revenge while trying to ensure that her baby isn’t too evil, I would buy twenty copies. ( )
  jobinsonlis | May 11, 2021 |
Plus point because it's a classic.
I fail to care about every characters.
It's just like every horror stories I watched in my childhood; why should this be any different?
( )
  DzejnCrvena | Apr 2, 2021 |
I wasn't impressed with this book in high school and even less so a month ago when I decided to re-read it. The suspense not only failed to try and kill me, it had never even tried to as much as grab my attention. Lazy bastard! ;)
( )
  Mrella | Mar 7, 2021 |
I have read and re-read this book too many times to count. It is a small masterpiece of horror. I love the everyday casualness of the story-telling, topped off by the uneasiness you feel while reading.....Rosemary is just going about her life, unsuspecting that something bad is in store for her.

Then she starts to figure it out and she has no one to help her...

It is an interesting story to read from the viewpoint of comparative religion. The author is Jewish, the protagonist is a lapsed (but still rather devout) Catholic being used as a surrogate mother by a group of Satan worshipers, and I, as a reader, am interpreting all of this from the viewpoint of a traditional Celtic pagan. My disbelief of all Christian mythology usually prevents me from enjoying most tales of Satan and/or demonic possession, but this little book surpassed my disbelief. "The Exorcist" and "The Omen" just give me a good case of the eye-rolls, but "Rosemary's Baby" was a lovely little scare. Even though they are biblical "witches", or maybe because of it, I really had a fun time watching them score a victory...................

HEY COTTON MATHER, DID YOU HEAR THAT? THE WITCHES WON.............and your dead ass can't do a thing about it! Take that right in your sad, sagging Puritan fuckhole!

The high point of the book for me was the Bramford; at this point I have to add a disclaimer that I have seen the film version of this novel many times. The apartment set in the movie was so absolutely wonderful; creepy but beautiful at the same time. Kudos to the set designer, because those visuals pop into my head whenever there is a scene in the apartment. It's become inseparable from the reading experience at this point. I loved that apartment building and would have been a neighbor of Rosemary's if given the chance. I mean, you could to a lot worse with neighbors than a pair of elderly and genteel satanists.

This book is a gem of the genre; in spite of its age, it is still holding up well. ( )
  Equestrienne | Jan 5, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 95 (next | show all)
Met de regelmaat van de klok verschijnen de herdrukken van dit boek, dat ook verfilmd is (en nog steeds vertoond wordt). Een jong echtpaar krijgt een flat toegewezen in een oud romantisch flatgebouw in New York, waarover verhalen gaan als zouden er veel zelfmoorden plaatsvinden en heksen en gifmengers wonen. Ze trekken zich hier niets van aan en voelen er zich gelukkig tot de vrouw, Rosemary, plotseling in verwachting raakt. Deze zwangerschap verloopt moeizaam en ze gaat aan de hand van allerlei gebeurtenissen eraan twijfelen of de buren (en ook haar man) die haar met allerlei zorgjes omringen toch niet aan hekserij doen. Het verhaal eindigt dan ook als ze een baby heeft gekregen die als tegenhanger van Christus, de zoon van Satan zou zijn. Nog steeds een boeiend verhaal, maar minder griezelig dan de film. Duidelijke druk op grauw papier.
added by karnoefel | editNBD / Biblion
 

» Add other authors (55 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Levin, Iraprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Levin, Iramain authorall editionsconfirmed
Beckett, RicheyIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kauppi, KaijaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
"As for the desirability of cheerfulness during pregnancy, this should follow naturally from the fact that you are well and are approaching what will prove to be (although you may not appreciate it now) the most permanently satisfying event in your life. Do not think, however, though you devote all your days to laughter, or all your nights to symphony concerts, that your child will be one bit cheerier or one whit more musical because of it. No, his mental characteristics are more deeply rooted than that ..."
Nicholson J. Eastman, M.D.
Expectant Motherhood
Dedication
Completed in August 1966, in Wilton, Connecticut, and dedicated to Gabrielle
First words
Rosemary and Guy Woodhouse had signed a lease on a five-room apartment in a geometric white house on First Avenue when they received word, from a woman named Mrs. Cortez, that a four-room apartment in the Bramford had become available.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Rosemary Woodhouse and her struggling actor husband Guy move into the Bramford, an old New York City apartment building with an ominous reputation and mostly elderly residents. Neighbors Roman and Minnie Castavet soon come nosing around to welcome the Woodhouses to the building, and despite Rosemary's reservations about their eccentricity and the weird noises that she keeps hearing, her husband takes a special shine to them. Shortly after Guy lands a plum Broadway role, Rosemary becomes pregnant, and the Castavets start taking a special interest in her welfare. As the sickened Rosemary becomes increasingly isolated, she begins to suspect that the Castavets' circle is not what it seems.

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Rosemary Woodhouse and her struggling actor-husband, Guy, move into the Bramford, an old New York City apartment building with an ominous reputation and only elderly residents. Neighbours Roman and Minnie Castavet soon come nosing around to welcome them; despite Rosemary's reservations about their eccentricity and the weird noises that she keeps hearing, her husband starts spending time with them. Shortly after Guy lands a plum Broadway role, Rosemary becomes pregnant, and the Castavets start taking a special interest in her welfare; as the sickened Rosemary becomes increasingly isolated, she begins to suspect that the Castavets' circle is not what it seems.
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