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Scoop (1938)

by Evelyn Waugh

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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3,448763,034 (3.8)240
Lord Copper, newspaper magnate and proprietor of the "Daily Beast, " has always prided himself on his intuitive flair for spotting ace reporters. That is not to say he has not made the odd blunder, however, and may in a moment of weakness make another. Acting on a dinner party tip from Mrs. Algernon Stitch, Lord Copper feels convinced that he has hit on just the chap to cover a promising war in the African Republic of Ishmaelia. So begins "Scoop, "Waugh's exuberant comedy of mistaken identity and brilliantly irreverent satire of the hectic pursuit of hot news.… (more)
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» See also 240 mentions

English (70)  Catalan (2)  Dutch (1)  Hebrew (1)  Swedish (1)  Spanish (1)  All languages (76)
Showing 1-5 of 70 (next | show all)
Scoop is one of the funniest and most carefree novels of Evelyn Waugh. Its appeal lies partly in our own strenuous relation with the media. Above all, the plot of the novel is based on the classic ploy of mistaken identity, sending the wrong man for the job. As a result of misfired nepotism, a newspaper, "The Daily Beast" sends one of its reporters to a war zone. What follows is just purely hilarious, truly a very funny story.

Evelyn Waugh at his best! ( )
  edwinbcn | Dec 20, 2021 |
A fake reporter reports on a fake war. Journalistic satire. Its lot shorter than you might expect, or at least feels so because not a lot happens and it felt a bit pointless. It certainly wasn't as funny as i expected and the main character doesn't really get involved in events to any significant degree. Its ok but nothing to write home about ;) . ( )
  wreade1872 | Nov 28, 2021 |
I loved this book.
It has a special sophisticated sense of humour that tickled me. It felt intellectual, but easy to read. The characters were like beautiful complex works of art. The plot was light hearted and amusing. I was able to read a little each night without getting confused or having to read back to remember. It was a book that really came to life.
At first I was confused by it, it was almost like I didn't know how to read it. I think this might have been because the pacing and the flow were different to what I’m used to. However, actually I think that this was one of the books strong points. It drew you in. It didn't feel like anything else I had ever read.
( )
  KittyCatrinCat | Aug 29, 2021 |
Evelyn Waugh published this satirical account of the unlikely success of a foreign correspondent just before the outbreak of World War Two, when the proxy war that the competing totalitarian dictatorships of Germany and Russia had waged in countries such as Spain became a direct confrontation.
The setting is the mythical northeast African country of Ishmaelia. Any resemblance to the nation that occupies this space in our world, Ethiopia (then called Abyssinia), is hardly coincidental since Waugh served as a correspondent there in 1935.
The book is divided into three sections. The first is hilarious, and the final section evoked a good number of guffaws from me. The middle section, set in Ishmaelia itself, wasn’t as amusing, no doubt because of Waugh’s recourse to national stereotypes. The posture of casual superiority that all Europeans in the book assume concerning all Africans is undoubtedly an accurate reflection of the late colonial period. It’s simply not funny anymore. Nor is the way that relatively harmless local quarrels are leveraged by the Europeans in the interests of competing ideologies. In the end, Waugh suggests that even these are fronts for claims to mineral rights. Something that didn’t end with the passing of the colonial era.
Still, I found the book enjoyable. Lord Copper, the press magnate who sets it all in motion, seems a send-up of Lord Beaverbrook, but his type lives on in the Murdochs of our day. One more thing lives on, the immortal name of the newspaper, The Daily Beast. ( )
  HenrySt123 | Jul 19, 2021 |
A hilarious satire of journalism, I feel like a lot of the book's skewering of the profession haven't aged a day. From the hapless protagonist John Boot to the imperiously clueless Lord Copper, the characters are funny and plausible as they lie and blunder around trying to "cover the story" of political instability in a country they're completely unfamiliar with. The news media's willing to punch up or even simply invent stories for effect is obviously still with us, and the constant theme of miscommunication is exploited in full Wodehousian form. Waugh has a good ear for deadpan dialogue, as well as parodies of overwrought writing: the famous one is "Feather-footed through the plashy fen passes the questing vole", but my favorite is the Thomas Friedman-esque "A spark is set to the cornerstone of civilization which will shake its roots like a chilling breath." ( )
  aaronarnold | May 11, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 70 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (10 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Waugh, Evelynprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Blake, QuentinIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Blewitt, DavidIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cameron, JamesIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Duzijn-van Zeelst, M.E.J.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Evans, HenriTraductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hitchens, ChristopherIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ràfols Gesa, FerranTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schnack, ElisabethTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Weiler, JanNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Weyergans, FranzTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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While still a young man, John Courteney Boot had, as his publisher proclaimed, 'achieved an assured and enviable position in contemporary letters'.
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Why, once Jakes went out to cover a revolution in one of the Balkan capitals. He overslept in his carriage, woke up at the wrong station, didn't know any different, got out, went straight to a hotel, and cabled off a thousand-word story about barricades in the streets, flaming churches, machine guns answering the rattle of his typewriter as he wrote, a dead child, like a broken doll, spreadeagled in the deserted roadway before his window - you know.
There was something un-English and not quite right about 'the country', with its solitude and self-sufficiency, its bloody recreations, its darkness and silence and sudden, inexplicable noises; the kind of place where you never know from one minute to the next that you may not be tossed by a bull or pitchforked by a yokel or rolled over and broken up by a pack of hounds.
'Feather-footed through the plashy fen passes the questing vole...'
'Up to a point, Lord Copper.'
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Lord Copper, newspaper magnate and proprietor of the "Daily Beast, " has always prided himself on his intuitive flair for spotting ace reporters. That is not to say he has not made the odd blunder, however, and may in a moment of weakness make another. Acting on a dinner party tip from Mrs. Algernon Stitch, Lord Copper feels convinced that he has hit on just the chap to cover a promising war in the African Republic of Ishmaelia. So begins "Scoop, "Waugh's exuberant comedy of mistaken identity and brilliantly irreverent satire of the hectic pursuit of hot news.

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Penguin Australia

3 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141187492, 0141195126, 0141193468

Hachette Book Group

An edition of this book was published by Hachette Book Group.

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