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Persepolis II: The Story of a Return

by Marjane Satrapi

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Persepolis (Omnibus 3-4)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
3,7881012,544 (4.07)1 / 147
In Persepolis, heralded by the Los Angeles Times as "one of the freshest and most original memoirs of our day," Marjane Satrapi dazzled us with her heartrending memoir-in-comic-strips about growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. Here is the continuation of her fascinating story. In 1984, Marjane flees fundamentalism and the war with Iraq to begin a new life in Vienna. Once there, she faces the trials of adolescence far from her friends and family, and while she soon carves out a place for herself among a group of fellow outsiders, she continues to struggle for a sense of belonging. Finding that she misses her home more than she can stand, Marjane returns to Iran after graduation. Her difficult homecoming forces her to confront the changes both she and her country have undergone in her absence and her shame at what she perceives as her failure in Austria. Marjane allows her past to weigh heavily on her until she finds some like-minded friends, falls in love, and begins studying art at a university. However, the repression and state-sanctioned chauvinism eventually lead her to question whether she can have a future in Iran. As funny and poignant as its predecessor, Persepolis 2 is another clear-eyed and searing condemnation of the human cost of fundamentalism. In its depiction of the struggles of growing up--here compounded by Marjane's status as an outsider both abroad and at home--it is raw, honest, and incredibly illuminating.… (more)
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» See also 147 mentions

English (99)  Swedish (1)  Danish (1)  All languages (101)
Showing 1-5 of 99 (next | show all)
Il Club del Libro / DRS
Libro del mese di Settembre 2021
  JaqJaq | Jan 7, 2022 |
The second half of Satrapi's memoir, about her life after she left Iran (and subsequently returned), is just as honest, powerful, hilarious, and heart-breaking as the first half. ( )
  evenlake | Mar 23, 2021 |
In short: everyone should read Persepolis.

Volume 1 had a charming, whimsical feel despite the backdrop of revolutionary Iran. Volume 2 is the natural extension of that, keeping its charming style but moving on to intense feelings of alienation and pain as Marjane finds herself stuck between worlds as she grows up. Even though I grew up under very different circumstances, I deeply relate to her search for herself in Austria and Iran and how she never quite fit in either culture, and the deep depression she fell into when she returned to her family. There’s so much I could say about the art style and the universality of the emotions but it would all fall short, so I can only say this: read it. Persepolis is incredible. ( )
  acardon | Feb 5, 2021 |
2011 (my brief review can be found in the LibraryThing post linked)
http://www.librarything.com/topic/104839#2623268 ( )
  dchaikin | Sep 26, 2020 |
Like its predecessor, I read this in one sitting. A part of me admits that I was not happy with some of the mistakes she made, yet I suppose one has to make the mistakes in order to learn. The story is as moving as ever; it is engaging. It just draws you in. The history lesson is there as well. Like other readers, I have wondered how people allow a totalitarian regime to rise. It often sneaks up on you, as it did in this memoir. A lesson to remain vigilant. The ending is bittersweet, but a good one as she finally finds her freedom. Definitely recommended. Though I borrowed them from the public library, these are books I would love to acquire for my collection. These are definitely must-reads. As I said before, a fine example of what can be done with the graphic novel format. ( )
  bloodravenlib | Aug 17, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 99 (next | show all)
Unlike the first book, it’s disjointed, tawdry, and unfocused. The story of her young adulthood doesn’t demonstrate the insight that made the first book so special.
 
May Satrapi continue to blend the personal and the political to such extraordinary effect.
added by stephmo | editBoston Globe, Carlo Wolff (Sep 14, 2004)
 
Ultimately, Persepolis 2 provides another valuable window into an alien (yet all too human) way of life, but it's a far more difficult book than Persepolis. A child who lets her harsh environment interfere with her empathy for others is understandable and tragic, but an adult with the same problem borders on distressing solipsism.
 
Satrapi's voice is very much her own, and the way the clash between European and Middle Eastern culture has played out in her life makes for compelling reading. What her book lacks, though, is perspective on the cultural revolution in which she and her circle lived (and sometimes died).
added by stephmo | editSlate, Douglas Wolk (Sep 7, 2004)
 
Still, her rebellious stunts never undermine Satrapi's unconditional love for her troubled homeland—which, in these times of religious fervor and political gain, resonates all the more poignantly.
 

» Add other authors (16 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Satrapi, Marjaneprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Menu, Jean-ChristopheCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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November 1984. I am in Austria.
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Persepolis was originally published in 4 volumes. Some later editions, especially in the U.S., combined volumes 1-2 into one work Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood; volumes 3-4 were combined into Persepolis: The Story of a Return. Keep this in mind when combining/separating.
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In Persepolis, heralded by the Los Angeles Times as "one of the freshest and most original memoirs of our day," Marjane Satrapi dazzled us with her heartrending memoir-in-comic-strips about growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. Here is the continuation of her fascinating story. In 1984, Marjane flees fundamentalism and the war with Iraq to begin a new life in Vienna. Once there, she faces the trials of adolescence far from her friends and family, and while she soon carves out a place for herself among a group of fellow outsiders, she continues to struggle for a sense of belonging. Finding that she misses her home more than she can stand, Marjane returns to Iran after graduation. Her difficult homecoming forces her to confront the changes both she and her country have undergone in her absence and her shame at what she perceives as her failure in Austria. Marjane allows her past to weigh heavily on her until she finds some like-minded friends, falls in love, and begins studying art at a university. However, the repression and state-sanctioned chauvinism eventually lead her to question whether she can have a future in Iran. As funny and poignant as its predecessor, Persepolis 2 is another clear-eyed and searing condemnation of the human cost of fundamentalism. In its depiction of the struggles of growing up--here compounded by Marjane's status as an outsider both abroad and at home--it is raw, honest, and incredibly illuminating.

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