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The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms

by N. K. Jemisin

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The Inheritance Trilogy (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3,3442462,895 (3.89)339
Yeine Darr is an outcast from the barbarian north. But when her mother dies under mysterious circumstances, she is summoned to the majestic city of Sky. There, to her shock, Yeine is named an heiress to the king. But the throne of the Hundred Thousand Kingdoms is not easily won, and Yeine is thrust into a vicious power struggle with cousins she never knew she had. As she fights for her life, she draws ever closer to the secrets of her mother's death and her family's bloody history.… (more)
  1. 70
    Who Fears Death by Nnedi Okorafor (electronicmemory)
    electronicmemory: Who Fears Death is post-apocalyptic futuristic fantasy and The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms draws from classical sword and sorcery, but both are excellent novels about heroines who have found themselves beset and gifted (or possibly cursed) by powers beyond reckoning, while caught up in a political and supernatural power struggle that spans generations and eventually time itself.… (more)
  2. 51
    The Broken Kingdoms by N. K. Jemisin (electronicmemory)
  3. 30
    Warbreaker by Brandon Sanderson (souloftherose)
    souloftherose: Both are epic fantasy novels featuring strong female characters and focusing on gods in the respective fantasy worlds and their interactions with humans
  4. 30
    The God Engines by John Scalzi (MyriadBooks)
    MyriadBooks: For the tools of chained gods.
  5. 31
    The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss (aulandez)
    aulandez: Both are strong first person narrated adventures of out-of-place heroes, and take familiar fantasy tropes and deconstruct them with intelligence and some wit.
  6. 20
    City of Stairs by Robert Jackson Bennett (calmclam)
    calmclam: Similar themes of empire and colonialism as well as wars against/between the gods.
  7. 21
    Racing the Dark by Alaya Dawn Johnson (PhoenixFalls)
    PhoenixFalls: Another female protagonist dragged into the affairs of the gods in a non-white high fantasy setting.
  8. 32
    The Sandman Vol. 1: Preludes and Nocturnes by Neil Gaiman (MyriadBooks)
  9. 10
    Paladin of Souls by Lois McMaster Bujold (storyjunkie)
  10. 10
    The Initiate by Louise Cooper (luciente)
  11. 10
    Dragon Sword and Wind Child by Noriko Ogiwara (kaionvin)
    kaionvin: Dueling gods, reincarnation, child-like characters, and a female protagonist who gets involved in it all.
  12. 11
    Lord of Light by Roger Zelazny (Shrike58)
    Shrike58: The cost of the abuse of divine powers, political & social intrigue, and a sprawling setting.
  13. 00
    The Redemption of Althalus by David Eddings (souloftherose)
    souloftherose: Another epic fantasy tale featuring gods
  14. 00
    Priestess of the White by Trudi Canavan (luciente)
  15. 12
    The Black Jewels Trilogy by Anne Bishop (aboulomania)
  16. 02
    Elfland by Freda Warrington (majkia)
    majkia: both are well-written creative takes on normal fantasy tropes
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» See also 339 mentions

English (246)  German (1)  All languages (247)
Showing 1-5 of 246 (next | show all)
Let us get the biases out of the way immediately: This is right up my alley. A large scope fantasy world based on the cynical intrigues of the elite, where an intelligent but comparatively naïve young girl gets unwillingly drawn into the centre of events, that's pretty much what I am looking for in a novel. Add to that the amazingly rich concept of the enslaved deities walking around the palace, and you have a pretty great experience.

Since I mostly liked everything about the novel, the following will single out the few things I didn't, but don't let that turn you off it. It is a solid novel.

I found the ending to be good (a relief, as the last time I read a book I was similarly happy with the premise and execution of as I read it, 'The Goblin Emperor', the lacklustre ending retroactively soured the experience a bit), though the largers strokes of the conclusion are a bit expected. Details and minor twists during it managed to surprise me, sure, but the overall outcomes were pretty much as I thought they would be since much earlier in the story. Now, I'm happy with this ending, it is well executed and satisfying, I just wish it'd felt a bit more mindblowing.

The only other criticism I have is a small one: The love/terror infatuation the protagonist quickly develops with the most dangerous of the enslaved deities. This feels cliched teen angst-like to me (though the character's age does make teen angst quite plausible). It is thankfully usually handled with some measure of grace (and genuine terror), doesn't take up too much of the narrative, and serves important functions in the themes as well as the character motivations and growth. So the problem here is likely to be more with my prejudices against the mortal teenager and the dangerous attraction to the immortal dark being than with the actual story.

There is a complex-but-not-as-complex-as-one-first-might-think family history for the protagonist to slowly unveil as the story progresses, providing a nice mystery subplot. This I like. I might wish a bit more time had been spent on the mortal political machinations and court intrigue than on the Big Questions discussed with the enslaved gods in the second half of the novel, but that's just personal preference. This is an exciting world with an engrossing narrative style (it is all in told the first person, and told well), and I'm quite excited to read the rest of the series. ( )
  Lucky-Loki | Jun 18, 2021 |
DNF at 14%

I think I'm going to place this in the "it's me not you" category. Sometimes being thrown right in the middle of things works for me, sometimes it doesn't. I'm more than willing to see where things go so long as I find the journey engaging. And by 14%, I expect to know something about the protag to make me care about their quest or fate or state of health. I know nothing about Yeine except she's an outsider. The gods/weapons/slaves seem to think she's something special, but I've seen nothing to give me that impression besides a random non-sensical kiss which is supposed to mean...something, I guess. Probably that she's going to fall in love with the alphahole who just terrorized her. Because every strong woman must have her alphahole. *yawn* There are also random jumps in the narrative that are probably supposed to ramp up tension but really just highlight that I know zero squat about anything.

There's no doubt this is well-written and that there's some sort of grand adventure that's going to go down. There's just not enough world-building, character-building or anything else-building at this point to draw me into this world and keep me reading. This is an extremely popular series though, so don't let my lack of connection dissuade you from checking it out for yourself.
  Linda_Bookworm | May 6, 2021 |
An enthralling read. Jemisin builds an excellent and engrossing world, populated with characters who are eminently relatable and yet often utterly different. The scope and elegance of this fantasy world and the interesting narrative style makes this a must-read ( )
  Andorion | Feb 6, 2021 |
I originally read this the year it came out, and by the time the sequel came out I neither remembered enough to want to go on with book 2, nor had time to reread. So, now that I have possession of the whole trilogy, I'm starting from book 1 again.

This is as powerful a read as is was the first time, and knowing (at least vaguely) what was coming did not marr that in the least. Possibly, given how tense I remember feeling the first time, knowing roughly how bad it was going to get was a bonus.

Complex high fantasy without all the bits I usually hate about high fantasy, and with a large amount of serious consideration of the implications of some of the tropes woven in to the background of the story. ( )
  fred_mouse | Jan 24, 2021 |
Really nice ideas. Not mind blowing, but very satisfying to read.
Similar in tone to the Goblin Emperor which I really enjoyed too. ( )
  mjhunt | Jan 22, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 246 (next | show all)
The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms definitely leaves me wanting more of this delightful new writer.
added by Jannes | editLocus Magazine, Farren Miller (Mar 6, 2011)
 

» Add other authors (6 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jemisin, N. K.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Benini, MilenaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Freeman, CasaundraNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nielsen, CliffCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Panepinto, LaurenCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Dedication
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I am not as I once was.
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The priests' lesson: beware the Nightlord, for his pleasure is a mortal's doom. My grandmother's lesson: beware love, especially with the wrong man.
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Wikipedia in English (2)

Yeine Darr is an outcast from the barbarian north. But when her mother dies under mysterious circumstances, she is summoned to the majestic city of Sky. There, to her shock, Yeine is named an heiress to the king. But the throne of the Hundred Thousand Kingdoms is not easily won, and Yeine is thrust into a vicious power struggle with cousins she never knew she had. As she fights for her life, she draws ever closer to the secrets of her mother's death and her family's bloody history.

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Book description
Yeine Darr is an outcast from the barbarian north. But when her mother dies under mysterious circumstances, she is summoned to the majestic city of Sky - a palace above the clouds where gods' and mortals' lives are intertwined. There, to her shock, Yeine is named one of the potential heirs to the king. But the throne of the Hundred Thousand Kingdoms is not easily won, and Yeine is thrust into a vicious power struggle with a pair of cousins she never knew she had. As she fights for her life, she draws ever closer to the secrets of her mother's death and her family's bloody history. But it's not just mortals who have secrets worth hiding and Yeine will learn how perilous the world can be when love and hate - and gods and mortals - are bound inseparably.
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Orbit Books

2 editions of this book were published by Orbit Books.

Editions: 0316043915, 0316043923

Hachette Book Group

2 editions of this book were published by Hachette Book Group.

Editions: 0316043915, 0316043923

 

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