HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Everything Is Illuminated (2002)

by Jonathan Safran Foer

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
13,022238323 (3.86)334
Jonathan is a Jewish college student searching Europe for the one person he believes can explain his roots. Alex, a lover of all things American and unsurpassed butcher of the English language, is his lovable Ukrainian guide. On their quixotic quest, the two young men look for Augustine, a woman who might have saved Jonathan's grandfather from the Nazis. As past and present merge, hysterically funny moments collide with episodes of great tragedy -- and an unforgettable story of one family's extraordinary history unfolds.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 334 mentions

English (223)  Dutch (3)  French (3)  Italian (3)  Swedish (2)  German (2)  Spanish (1)  Greek (1)  All languages (238)
Showing 1-5 of 223 (next | show all)
This book is incredible from the first to last word. The architecture is unlike anything I've ever seen. It can be overwhelming, which is why years ago when I first tried to read this book, I immediately put it back down. I think it's a book that can only be read if you are ready to take in a lot and be present in your reading. The overall effect, if you can make it to the end, is a book about the complexity of love that humans have for one another and for themselves. It is a book of dreams, history, unforgettable characters and images. And somehow, the author manages to make it a book on writing and the art of the novel, which is in and of itself an unbelievable feat. I've never been more in love with a book. ( )
  Oleacae | Oct 24, 2020 |
Awful.
( )
  Mona07452 | Oct 23, 2020 |
Although it was an enjoyable read, this is one of few cases where I enjoyed the movie more than the book. ( )
  kohrmanmj | Sep 21, 2020 |
It's a strange tale to be sure. Jonathan Safran Foer, the hero of the story, sets out to find a woman who may have saved his grandfather during WWII. He travels with a couple of people who are enterprising enough to take his money in exchange for driving him all over the Ukraine. Especially Alex, the translator. We are treated to Alex's crazy brand of English interwoven with Foer's accounts of what is going on and with a little historical tale about an incident that became a myth, the reason for an annual festival.

Alex's butchered English is hilarious. Forever choosing the wrong synonyms for the words he wants to use, he treats us to "I must eat a slice of humble pie for not finding Augustine, but you clutch how rigid it was." and similar misuses.

I got a little tired of the historical tale, wanted it done already. There was a lot of repetition and shifting of pieces in it.

I was a little stumped by it. I wish I had written this right after reading. I might have made more sense of it then. ( )
  slojudy | Sep 8, 2020 |
This book is composed of three intertwined fragments, essentially comprising two different stories with two different storytellers, and correspondence that links the two.

I don't usually read more than one book at a time because inevitably I begin to favour one particular book at the expense of the others. So here too I suspect most people either prefer the often hilarious and ultimately moving Alex chapters, or the overtly literary historical chapters, and ultimately want the other chapters to get a move on.

I fall into the Alex camp, but enjoyed the other parts of the novel too. In the end, though, the very likeable and very human tale of Alex was more endearing than the fairy tale Foer crafted around the history of his character's ancestors.

Overall, then, the book is indeed very funny at places, occasionally brutal, a little sex-obsessed at times, and well worth a read. ( )
  imlee | Jul 7, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 223 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (14 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Foer, Jonathan Safranprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Abelsen, PeterTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bocchiola, MassimoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Shina, ScottNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Woodman, JeffNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
Simply and impossibly: For My Family
First words
My legal name is Alexander Perchov.
Quotations
One day you will do things for me that you hate. That is what it means to be family.
The only thing worse than being sad is for others to know that you are sad.
What is wrong with you?
Nothing, I just don't eat meat!
Grandfather informs me that is not possible.
With writing, we have second chances.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (3)

Jonathan is a Jewish college student searching Europe for the one person he believes can explain his roots. Alex, a lover of all things American and unsurpassed butcher of the English language, is his lovable Ukrainian guide. On their quixotic quest, the two young men look for Augustine, a woman who might have saved Jonathan's grandfather from the Nazis. As past and present merge, hysterically funny moments collide with episodes of great tragedy -- and an unforgettable story of one family's extraordinary history unfolds.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.86)
0.5 14
1 85
1.5 18
2 189
2.5 51
3 667
3.5 167
4 1120
4.5 164
5 1001

Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141008253, 0141037326

Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 151,755,681 books! | Top bar: Always visible