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The Idiot (1869)

by Fyodor Dostoevsky

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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14,129146317 (4.12)404
Inspired by an image of Christas suffering, Fyodor Dostoyevsky set out to portray aa truly beautiful soula colliding with the brutal reality of contemporary society. Returning to St. Petersburg from a Swiss sanatorium, the gentle and naive Prince Myshkinaknown as athe idiotaapays a visit to his distant relative General Yepanchin and proceeds to charm the General and his circle. But after becoming infatuated with the beautiful Nastasya Filippovna, Myshkin finds himself caught up in a love triangle and drawn into a web of blackmail, betrayal, and, ultimately, murder. This new translation by David McDuff is sensitive to the shifting registers of the original Russian, capturing the nervous, elliptic flow of the narrative for a new generation of readers.… (more)
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» See also 404 mentions

English (120)  Dutch (5)  French (3)  Italian (3)  Swedish (3)  Catalan (3)  German (3)  Spanish (2)  Portuguese (2)  Portuguese (Portugal) (1)  Danish (1)  All languages (146)
Showing 1-5 of 120 (next | show all)
O livro narra a história de um príncipe que sai de um sanatório, onde estava a curar sua epilepsia. em busca dos últimos descendentes de sua linhagem. Ele se depara com a sociedade russa corrompida pelo poder e pelo dinheiro e se intriga com uma jovem garota de grande beleza e tristeza. Alegoria para Jesus em uma terra de pecadores, clássico absoluto e literatura obrigatória. ( )
  Marcos_Augusto | Sep 17, 2021 |
First of all: adiha-w=0-]r
[3Ltq3wiejfiosgjipeugiouswptusadhko;gfkews'zep2 ]qrpdfa[w oedjsjp[
Secondly: I thought that the bit where Rogozhin brings Myshkin (by the hand!) to be blessed by his mother was rough. I thought that the part where Rogozhin attempts to stab Myshkin (with the phallic-symbol-knife!!!!), was rough. I thought the part where Aglaya says that Nastasya is /in love with her/ was rough. But absolutely nothing could have prepared me for the end, in which Myshkin and Rogozhin lie down together (together!) and hold and caress each other while awaiting the consequences of the whole mess to come in the morning and Nastasya is [redacted] and Aglaya has ruined her own life and started ruining it after her confrontation with Nastasya... I felt absolutely Feral. Dostoevsky had absolutely no right to write something like that. oh my god.
Also the scene where Nastasya slapped a guy in the face with a riding crop was hot full stop. ( )
  ghostwalls | Aug 17, 2021 |
Louis Jaffe rec
  wordloversf | Aug 14, 2021 |
Fiction
  hpryor | Aug 8, 2021 |
first dostoyevsky for me and while it was a very long and arduous reading, i quite enjoyed it. ( )
  ernest-heminways | Jan 2, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 120 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (296 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Dostoevsky, Fyodorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Avsey, IgnatTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Carlisle, HenryTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Carlisle, OlgaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dahl, StaffanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Eichenberg, FritzIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Frank, JosephIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Garnett, ConstanceTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Geier, SwetlanaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hill, JamesCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kjetsaa, GeirTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kuukasjärvi, OlliTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Laín Entralgo, JoséTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Magarshack, DavidTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Manger, HermienTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Martin, Eva M.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pevear, RichardTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Thomson, J.Jac.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Timmer, Charles B.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Volokhonsky, LarissaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Witt, SusannaForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Yarmolinksy, AvrahmIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Towards the end of November, during a warm spell, at around nine o'clock in the morning, a train of the Petersburg-Warsaw line was approaching Petersburg at full steam.
At nine o'clock in the morning, towards the end of November, the Warsaw train was approaching Petersburg at full speed. It was thawing, and so damp and foggy that it was difficult to distinguish anything ten paces from the line to right or left of the carriage windows. Some of the passengers were returning from abroad, but the third-class compartments were most crowded, chiefly with people of humble rank, who had come a shorter distance on business. All of course were tired and shivering, their eyes were heavy after the night's journey, and all their faces were pale and yellow to match the fog. [Trans. Constance Garnett]
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Inspired by an image of Christas suffering, Fyodor Dostoyevsky set out to portray aa truly beautiful soula colliding with the brutal reality of contemporary society. Returning to St. Petersburg from a Swiss sanatorium, the gentle and naive Prince Myshkinaknown as athe idiotaapays a visit to his distant relative General Yepanchin and proceeds to charm the General and his circle. But after becoming infatuated with the beautiful Nastasya Filippovna, Myshkin finds himself caught up in a love triangle and drawn into a web of blackmail, betrayal, and, ultimately, murder. This new translation by David McDuff is sensitive to the shifting registers of the original Russian, capturing the nervous, elliptic flow of the narrative for a new generation of readers.

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After his great portrayal of a guilty man in Crime and Punishment, Dostoevsky set out in The Idiot to portray a man of pure innocence. The twenty-six-year-old Prince Myshkin, following a stay of several years in a Swiss sanatorium, returns to Russia to collect an inheritance and “be among people.” Even before he reaches home he meets the dark Rogozhin, a rich merchant’s son whose obsession with the beautiful Nastasya Filippovna eventually draws all three of them into a tragic denouement. In Petersburg the prince finds himself a stranger in a society obsessed with money, power, and manipulation. Scandal escalates to murder as Dostoevsky traces the surprising effect of this “positively beautiful man” on the people around him, leading to a final scene that is one of the most powerful in all of world literature.
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Legacy Library: Fyodor Dostoevsky

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Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 014044792X, 0451531523

Urban Romantics

An edition of this book was published by Urban Romantics.

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Tantor Media

An edition of this book was published by Tantor Media.

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