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The Brothers Karamazov (1880)

by Fyodor Dostoevsky

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
26,57330393 (4.37)4 / 1043
Dostoevsky's last and greatest novel, The Karamazov Brothers (1880) is both a brilliantly told crime story and a passionate philosophical debate. The dissolute landowner Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov is murdered; his sons--the atheist intellectual Ivan, the hot-blooded Dmitry, and the saintly novice Alyosha--are all involved at some level. Brilliantly bound up with this psychological drama is Dostoevsky's intense and disturbing exploration of many deeply felt ideas about the existence of God, freedom of will, the collective nature of guilt, and the disastrous consequences of rationalism. Filled with eloquent voices, this new translation fully realizes the power and dramatic virtuosity of Dostoevsky's most brilliant work.… (more)
  1. 212
    The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoyevsky (PrincessPaulina, melies)
    PrincessPaulina: "The Idiot" is overlooked compared to Dostoevsky's other work, but in my opinion it's the most engaging. Deals with upper crust society in pre-revolutionary Russia
  2. 30
    The Master of Petersburg by J. M. Coetzee (xtien)
    xtien: Brilliand novel by Coetzee about a fictional Dostoevsky
  3. 44
    Thus Spoke Zarathustra by Friedrich Nietzsche (igor.chubin)
Romans (21)
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English (269)  Italian (7)  Dutch (5)  German (4)  French (4)  Spanish (3)  Catalan (2)  Swedish (1)  Danish (1)  Russian (1)  Portuguese (1)  Greek (1)  Portuguese (Portugal) (1)  Hebrew (1)  All languages (301)
Showing 1-5 of 269 (next | show all)
What. A. Book. My first Russian literature read and wow! I'll admit, I don't think I was quite equipped for some of the religious philosophy, and some of the monologues that went on for pages with no break, while beautiful, were a bit difficult to read, but I know that whenever I see The Brothers Karamazov on a shelf now I'm going to smile. This book reminded me to slow down when I'm reading, and how wonderful it is to read long books that really get into the life of the characters and the setting you've been dropped into. Such awesome, complicated characters, and depth in their conversations. I also wasn't expecting such... positive messages? Despite the grim topic? Definitely met and subverted my expectations :)
Yes, I'll admit I didn't understand absolutely everything in this book, but it was a 776 pages I was happy to read nonetheless! Definitely want to read more of Doestoevsky! ( )
  grandma.meg | Sep 10, 2022 |
Hurrah for Karamazov!

Dosto leaving me speechless yet again - which really puts me to shame because he can make a speech last four chapters! I mean, it's a 1000 page book so obviously it is brimming with depth and stories and character, but I was still surprised at how expansive his world was. Most impressively was the short time frame Dosto used, exploring the past in flashbacks, but mainly focusing on the same two months, just with a different perspectives.

I love the way he played with truth, constantly changing my perception of which characters I can trust - can I even trust the narrator? - and arguing compellingly the case for events that contradict the ones previously told to me. And what should I turn to for certainty? Knowledge, religion, or alcoholic vice? For Dosto, all these means seem equal in their destructiveness, and yet all seem to be different means to the same end... some kind of spiritual salvation.

Because The Bros. Karam. is at once a compelling murder mystery, developing into a riveting courtroom drama - and yet that's only really the last 400 pages. Before then is the highly-scrutinised accounts of who the Brothers are, the intense women they surround themselves with, the insightful children of the town, the muzhiks and the aristocrats... and the barin himself!

In the end, I wanted the novel to go on for all eternity, for the death of the book to evoke not so much a putrid smell but leave me in the company of sparrows. Perhaps all I want is for Alyosha to comfort me with certain truths and spiritual naivety... or maybe I should just leave 19th-century Russia all together... ( )
  Danisstillalive | Sep 6, 2022 |
Meh. Dostoevsky really likes to go off on tangents and drone on with details irrelevant to the overall story, so that it drags on needlessly long. This would have been a lot more enjoyable if it had been condensed to the main narrative, and even that thoughtfully restricted. ( )
  jessoftheBooks | Aug 23, 2022 |
Done! More later. ( )
  DarrinLett | Aug 14, 2022 |
Very something! I especially liked the part where they talked about stuff. ( )
  Count_Myshkin | Aug 11, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 269 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (98 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Dostoevsky, Fyodorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Anhava, MarttiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bazzarelli, EridanoForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brockway, HarryIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Davidson, FrederickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Eichenberg, FritzIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Eng, Jan van derTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fondse, MarkoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Garnett, ConstanceTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Geier, SwetlanaÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kosloff, A.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Langeveld, ArthurTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
MacAndrew, Andrew H.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Magarshack, DavidTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Maugham, W. SomersetEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McDuff, DavidIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mochulsky, KonstantinIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mongault, HenriTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nötzel, KarlTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pevear, RichardTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Polledro, AlfredoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Portugués, José MaríaForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Prina, SerenaEditor and Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pyykkö, LeaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rogers, T. N. R.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rudzik, O.H.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sales, JoanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vance, SimonNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Volokhonsky, LarissaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Yarmolinsky, AvrahmIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zambrano Barragán, J.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
Verily, verily, I say unto, you, except a corn of wheat fall into the ground and die, it abideth alone: but if it die, it bringth forth much fruit.
— John 12:24
Dedication
Tillägnas Anna Grigorjevna Dostojevskaja
Dedicated to

Anna Grigorievna Dostoevsky
First words
Alexey Fyodorovich Karamazov was the third son of Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov, a landowner well known in our district in his own day, and still remembered among us owing to his tragic and obscure death, which happened just thirteen years ago, and of which I shall speak in its proper place. (Garnett, 1912)
Aleksei Fyodorovich Karamazov was the third son of Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov, a landowner of our district, extremely well known in his time (and to this day still remembered in these parts) on account of his violent and mysterious death exactly thirteen years ago, the circumstances of which I shall relate in due course. (Avsey 1994)
Alexey Fyodorovitch Karamazov was the third son of Fyodor Pavlovitch Karamazov, a landowner well known in our district in his own day, and still remembered among us owing to his gloomy and tragic death, which happened thirteen years ago, and which I shall describe in its proper place. (Garnett, Great Books, 1952)
Alexei Fyodorovich Karamazov was the third son of a landowner from our district, Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov, well known in his own day (and still remembered among us) because of his dark and tragic death, which happened exactly thirteen years ago and which I shall speak of in its proper place. (Pevear/Volokhonsky, 1990)
[Introduction] The Brothers Karamazov is a joyful book. (Peavear/Volokhonsky, 1990)
Quotations
Very well then - tell me the truth, squash me like a cockroach.
(McDuff,1993)
In schools children are a tribe without mercy.
(McDuff, 1993)
I have, as it were, torn my soul in half before you, and you have taken advantage of it and are rummaging with your fingers in both halves along the torn place...O God!
(McDuff, 1993)
I'm a Karamazov - when I fall into the abyss, I go straight into it, head down and heels up . . . 
Last words
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Disambiguation notice
Individual volumes should not be combined with the complete set/work or different volumes of the same set/work.
Publisher's editors
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Canonical DDC/MDS
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References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Dostoevsky's last and greatest novel, The Karamazov Brothers (1880) is both a brilliantly told crime story and a passionate philosophical debate. The dissolute landowner Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov is murdered; his sons--the atheist intellectual Ivan, the hot-blooded Dmitry, and the saintly novice Alyosha--are all involved at some level. Brilliantly bound up with this psychological drama is Dostoevsky's intense and disturbing exploration of many deeply felt ideas about the existence of God, freedom of will, the collective nature of guilt, and the disastrous consequences of rationalism. Filled with eloquent voices, this new translation fully realizes the power and dramatic virtuosity of Dostoevsky's most brilliant work.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Tre fratelli con caratteri molto diversi: uno orgoglioso e sensuale, uno razionale fino all'eccesso e uno sinceramente religioso; un figlio illegittimo malato ed emarginato ed un padre avaro e crudele, odiato e disprezzato da tutti.
(piopas)
Haiku summary
Sad Russian people
griping about God and stuff.
Wish Dad was still here.
(LeBoeuf)

Legacy Library: Fyodor Dostoyevsky

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Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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Urban Romantics

An edition of this book was published by Urban Romantics.

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