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The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket (1838)

by Edgar Allan Poe

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,829386,939 (3.64)93
After reading an 1836 newspaper account of a shipwreck and its two survivors, Edgar Allan Poe penned his only novel, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket, the story of a stowaway on a Nantucket whaleship who finds himself enmeshed in the dark side of life at sea: mutiny, cannibalism, savagery--even death. As Jeffrey Meyers writes in his Introduction: "[Poe] remains contemporary because he appeals to basic human feelings and expresses universal themes common to all men in all languages: dreams, love, loss; grief, mourning, alienation; terror, revenge, murder; insanity, disease, and death." Within the pages of this novel, we encounter nearly all of them. This Modern Library Paperback Classic reprints the text of the original 1838 American edition.… (more)
  1. 50
    At the Mountains of Madness and Other Tales of Terror {4 stories} by H. P. Lovecraft (ghilbrae)
  2. 20
    An Antarctic Mystery by Jules Verne (391)
    391: An Antarctic Mystery is Verne's response/sequel to Poe's book.
  3. 10
    The Purple Cloud by M. P. Shiel (hathaway_library)
    hathaway_library: This narrative hits its stride at sea, combining elements of the fantastic with a visit to a polar region.
  4. 00
    The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym and the Abyss of Interpretation by J. Gerald Kennedy (bluepiano)
  5. 00
    Moby Dick by Herman Melville (caflores)
  6. 00
    The Other Side of the Mountain by Michel Bernanos (bluepiano)
    bluepiano: Each is an account of a shipwreck whose survivors are heading for an unearthly sort of place. Poe's tale is mostly about the voyage and Bernanos's about what happens on landfall. Both are great reading.
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» See also 93 mentions

English (27)  Spanish (5)  Italian (2)  French (1)  Dutch (1)  Catalan (1)  German (1)  All languages (38)
Showing 1-5 of 27 (next | show all)
I liked this book. It's a classic tale of adventures, there are offshoots at certain points where the writer goes off in a tangent, but I love all that additional informaron. It's a product of it's time, and i absolutely love it. It can be full of racism at times but you shouldn't judge things by modern standards, it used to be common place back then, not saying it was right. I absolutely love Poe's style of writing, those long sentences hypnotise me. All in all, if you're a Poe fanboy like me, you're gonna love it, if not, then give it a try if you're looking for an adventure novel with some facts thrown in, some 19th century facts. It's time travel for me. ( )
  Sebuktegin | May 25, 2021 |
«La Narración de Arthur Gordon Pym de Nantucket comprende los detalles de un motín y las atroces carnicerías a bordo del bergantín Grampus, en su viaje a los Mares del Sur, en el mes de junio de 1827; con un relato de la reconquista del buque por los sobrevivientes; su naufragio y los horribles sufrimientos por el hambre; su rescate por la goleta británica Jane Guy; el breve crucero de esta última por el océano Antártico, su captura y la matanza de la tripulación en un archipiélago del paralelo 84 de latitud sur» Noticia que acompañaba a la edición original de 1838. Luis Scafati ilumina con profundo talento los deleitables terrores de esta novela, donde se cifran todas las obsesiones del genial Edgar Allan Poe
  Aido2021 | Feb 1, 2021 |
In his book 'The Old Patagonian Express,' Paul Theroux praised Edgar Allan Poe's one novel, and wrote at length about the mysterious atmosphere that pervaded the text. I felt it too - there is something both magical and macabre in here, and I wonder, now that I've finished the book, if a great part of the magic comes from the fact that rather a lot - around the middle especially - tends to sag. The adventures suffered by the narrator sit right at the limit of what could ever be believed, and sometimes stray further across the border even than that, but of all the 'adventure' novels I have read, none have focused my attention quite like this one. ( )
  soylentgreen23 | Nov 29, 2020 |
A very strange book, of perhaps only historical interest. Certainly not entertaining. Unless you are the sort who is entertained by questions such as "Is this a subtle exercise in literary technique or a piece of trivial hackwork that acquires any literary merit it may have via Poe's later reputation?"

The only part I liked were the authorial games Poe plays with as a sort of framing device. Reminded me of Borges. But whereas Borges clearly does those sorts of things on purpose, Poe may (or may not) have stumbled upon them through a semi-fortuitous combination of commercial expediency and drunkenness.

Unless you are already a Poe fan, figuring out which would likely hold little interest.

(PS A perplexing side note: reading Poe seems to have had a rather desultory and enervating effect on my syntax and diction, which has quite inexplicably become rather vainglorious. Quite perplexing indeed....) ( )
  ralphpalm | Nov 11, 2019 |
Okay, I read this book for mostly two reasons: 1) I bought the book Pym by Mat Johnson, and figured I should read the book it is referencing first, and 2) Melville House published it in their novella series and you know I'm a sucker for Melville House.

Of course, in what should probably be embarrassing for someone in love with a publisher who has named themselves after Melville, I can't really stand nautical writing. I mean, there's nothing really wrong with books that take place at sea, but inevitably there are multiple scenes all about rigging the jib sail and something the mizzen deck and I have no reference for any of these things and can't be bothered and it makes me batty. My strategy for this book was basically just to cross my eyes and skim through all those sections, which was pretty okay for getting me the background I need in order to appreciate Pym.

This is a strange book. Of that tradition of adventure books filled with peril after peril and a few unlikely escapes. Rather different from Poe's horror, but there are some bits of dread that do feel more familiar. Then there is the frighteningly racist depiction of the "natives" discovered in the Antarctic region. I am so incredibly curious to see Pym's updated version.

Glad I read it, but not my fave. ( )
  greeniezona | Dec 6, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 27 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (208 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Edgar Allan Poeprimary authorall editionscalculated
Álvarez, José MaríaIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Baudelaire, CharlesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
De Macedo, MarianiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Deilen, Bas vanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Etzel, GiselaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gómez de la Serna, JulioTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kopley, RichardEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kubin, AlfredIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pollin, Burton R.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schmidt, ArnoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wölbing, JürgenIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Die Abenteuer des Arthur Gordon Pym: Als ich von der Südsee und anderswo nach einer Reihe merkwürdiger Abenteuer, über die ich in diesem Buch berichten werde, vor wenigen Monaten in die Vereinigten Staaten zurückkehrte, geriet ich zufällig in die Gesellschaft einiger Herren aus Richmond in Virginia.
König Pest: In einer Oktobernacht gegen zwölf Uhr - es war unter der ritterlichen Regierung König Eduards des Dritten - bemerkten zwei Seeleute, die der Mannschaft eines kleinen, augenblicklich in der Themse vor Anker liegenden Handelsschiffes angehörten, mit einigem Erstaunen, dass sie sich in einer Kneipe befanden, die im Kirchspiel Sanct Andreas lag und als Schild das Porträt einer "fidelen Teerjacke" trug.
Die Maske des Roten Todes: Der Rote Tod hatte schon lange schon im Lande gewütet; noch nie hatte die Pest grauenhaftere Verheerungen angerichtet.
Der Untergang des Hauses Usher: An einem dunklen stummen Herbsttag, an dem die Wolken tief und schwer fast bis zur Erde herabhingen, war ich lange Zeit durch eine eigentümlich trübe Gegend geritten und sah endlich, als sich schon die Abendschatten niedersenkten, das Stammhaus der Familie Usher vor mir.
Der Teufel im Glockenstuhl: Jedermann weiss, dass der holländische Marktflecken Spiessburgh der schönste Ort der Welt ist - oder ach! - war.
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After reading an 1836 newspaper account of a shipwreck and its two survivors, Edgar Allan Poe penned his only novel, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket, the story of a stowaway on a Nantucket whaleship who finds himself enmeshed in the dark side of life at sea: mutiny, cannibalism, savagery--even death. As Jeffrey Meyers writes in his Introduction: "[Poe] remains contemporary because he appeals to basic human feelings and expresses universal themes common to all men in all languages: dreams, love, loss; grief, mourning, alienation; terror, revenge, murder; insanity, disease, and death." Within the pages of this novel, we encounter nearly all of them. This Modern Library Paperback Classic reprints the text of the original 1838 American edition.

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