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Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by…
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Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (1968)

by Philip K. Dick

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Blade Runner (1)

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11,620302232 (3.97)2 / 509
Recently added byprivate library, Ahleksi, Another_Irina, Petulisa, Leticia.Toraci, maldrin, AmandaEEnders, MimiSoot
Legacy LibrariesTerence Kemp McKenna
1960s (233)
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English (284)  French (5)  Spanish (4)  Italian (2)  Polish (1)  Swedish (1)  Dutch (1)  Romanian (1)  Portuguese (1)  All languages (300)
Showing 1-5 of 284 (next | show all)
Ultimately I enjoyed this book, it was a quick and easy read but overall a bit depressing.
I found Deckard reasonably sympathetic but couldn't really care about the androids and mercerism confused me. An interesting possible future world is believably portrayed and I enjoyed little details like the mood organ. Glad I finally read this SciFi classic. ( )
  Laurochka | Feb 6, 2016 |
I'd never read any Dick before, and was told this was a good place to start. After being told for years that the movie adaptations are nothing like his books, I found I recognized standard Dick themes pretty easily, the most prominent here being the questioning of reality and belief systems.

I felt like... this book was bizarrely obsessed with animals. I wasn't expecting that. It begins with Deckard discussing Percherons with his neighbor, then they talk about his electric sheep at length. He leaves for work, stops at a pet shop to oogle an ostrich, then makes inquiries about the ostrich and an electric version when he gets to work. When he goes to his first job, he discusses raccoons and owls extensively with his client. This is just the beginning of the book. The well-thumbed "Sidney's" animal guide comes out constantly, and at one point he considers busting someone for having an early copy.

People keep animals as part of Mercerism, which tries to teach empathy to humans and is one of the things that sets them apart from androids. Still. Rick Deckard thinks about animals A LOT.

I got excited when the conclusion to the android hunt rolled around, but the actual finish of the book is a lengthy discussion of Deckard's new animal and a fortuitous animal find out in the wilds.

ANIMALS.

In fact, I would say the least faithful thing about the Blade Runner adaptation is that they aren't constantly talking about animals. ( )
1 vote ConnieJo | Jan 31, 2016 |
This book wasn't quite what I expected. It turned out that I'd picked up a revised copy ie re-written (simplified) for a specific reading level. As such I found the writing style very simplistic and, I suspect, not at all like the original author intended. Very disappointing in that respect.

Other than that, it was interesting to read the original story and compare to Blade Runner. I now feel that I need to re-watch the film and re-read the book in its original format.

C'est la vie! ( )
  Cassandra2020 | Jan 24, 2016 |
I am not normally a fan of science fiction but I did enjoy this book very much. There is a deep underlying philosophical theme of what makes us all human. It questions the values of society, as well as the very meaning of life and redemption. I liked the way it dealt with human compassion and empathy. A must read if you are a science fiction fan. ( )
  eadieburke | Jan 19, 2016 |
I love old science fiction, when it really was just imagination. Arthur C Clark, Ray Bradbury and Robert Heinlein. I can now add Philip Dick to this list. These older sci-fi writers didn't give you all you needed, but left a little to the imagination, letting their reader fill in gaps and make assumptions. This book was no different. Not everything was tidy, and the ending wasn't sunshine and rainbows. It feels real, even with hover cars and electric animals. I am already looking forward to reading more by this author. ( )
  CarmenMilligan | Jan 18, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 284 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (62 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Dick, Philip K.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Brick, ScottNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dougoud, JacquelineTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Duranti, RiccardoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Goodfellow, PeterCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Michniewicz, SueCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Moore, ChrisCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Struzen, DrewCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wölfl, NorbertTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zelazny, RogerIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
And still I dream he treads the lawn,
walking ghostly in the dew,
pierced by my glad singing through.
~ Yeats
Dedication
To Tim and Serena Powers, my dearest friends
To Maren Augusta Bergrud
August 10, 1923 - June 14, 1967
First words
A merry little surge of electricity piped by automatic alarm from the mood organ beside his bed awakened Rick Deckard.
Quotations
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
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Wikipedia in English (4)

Book description
It was January 2021, and Rick Deckard had a license to kill.

Somewhere among the hordes of humans out there, lurked several rogue androids. Deckard's assignment--find them and then... "retire" them.

Trouble was, the androids all looked and acted exactly like humans, and they didn't want to be found!
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0345404475, Paperback)

"The most consistently brilliant science fiction writer in the world."
--John Brunner

THE INSPIRATION FOR BLADERUNNER. . .

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? was published in 1968. Grim and foreboding, even today it is a masterpiece ahead of its time.

By 2021, the World War had killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remained coveted any living creature, and for people who couldn't afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacrae: horses, birds, cats, sheep. . . They even built humans.

Emigrées to Mars received androids so sophisticated it was impossible to tell them from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans could wreak, the government banned them from Earth. But when androids didn't want to be identified, they just blended in.

Rick Deckard was an officially sanctioned bounty hunter whose job was to find rogue androids, and to retire them. But cornered, androids tended to fight back, with deadly results.

"[Dick] sees all the sparkling and terrifying possibilities. . . that other authors shy away from."
--Paul Williams, Rolling Stone

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:14 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

THE INSPIRATION FOR BLADERUNNER. . . Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? was published in 1968. Grim and foreboding, even today it is a masterpiece ahead of its time. By 2021, the World War had killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remained coveted any living creature, and for people who couldn't afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacrae: horses, birds, cats, sheep. . . They even built humans. Emigrees to Mars received androids so sophisticated it was impossible to tell them from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans could wreak, the government banned them from Earth. But when androids didn't want to be identified, they just blended in. Rick Deckard was an officially sanctioned bounty hunter whose job was to find rogue androids, and to retire them. But cornered, androids tended to fight back, with deadly results.… (more)

» see all 13 descriptions

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