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Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by…
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Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (1968)

by Philip K. Dick

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Blade Runner (1)

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11,740308225 (3.96)2 / 520
1960s (226)
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English (291)  French (5)  Spanish (4)  Italian (2)  Polish (1)  Swedish (1)  Dutch (1)  Romanian (1)  Portuguese (1)  All languages (307)
Showing 1-5 of 291 (next | show all)
Read this book if you like science fiction. This book will blow your mind! Top shelf in my science fiction collection -- read this or you are not cool. The blade runner is tasked to put an end to some escaped "replicants" or cybernetic super killers. He alone can discover who is real and uses hardened skills of one of the great veterans in the field in this amazingly written glimpse of the future. Time is a real luxury and no matter how much they have seen it still isn't enough to keep away the end that is nigh, even if Decker can't stop them. Duality is profound in this story and descriptions of future cities, flying transports, cars, big guns, .. this book is a good one, guys. ( )
  Mister-T | Apr 21, 2016 |
Superb book! A question of the future, when androids will be so close to humanity, the only difference being: empathy. ( )
  Gerardlionel | Apr 2, 2016 |
Philip K. Dick's Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? explores what it means to be human. Set in a post-apocalyptic San Francisco in the 1990s, the story follows bounty hunter Rick Deckard who retires androids that have escaped from off-world colonies elsewhere in the solar system and illegally come to Earth. The androids are so advanced that only the slower emphathic response gives them away. The test, however, is flawed as humans suffering from disorders such as schizophrenia or those affected by the nuclear fallout might have a delayed emotional response and generate a false positive. Deckard and the other humans frequently use Penfield mood organs to artificially change their moods as well as an empathy box to share emotions with each other as part of a semi-religious following called Mercerism. Life on Earth following World War Terminus is so sacred that animals sell for tens of thousands of dollars, with spiders having a value of at least a hundred dollars. Due to this, animals are prized not for their inherent value as living beings or for their place in nature, but rather as status symbols, with those who cannot afford a live animal purchasing an electric knockoff. Ironically, the androids are more alive than these electric animals, being composed of biological materials and nearly indistinguishable from humans save the results of an empathy or bone marrow test.
Dick's novel served as the basis for Ridley Scott's 1982 film, Blade Runner. The basic plot is the same with most characters' names unchanged and the film followed the same basic themes. That said, Scott, in his film, created a modern techno-noir story and, though Dick's novel contains many elements of the hardboiled detective, it spends more time exploring ideas than it does on atmosphere. Both novel and film have left a permanent mark on American science-fiction. ( )
  DarthDeverell | Apr 1, 2016 |
You'd think I was choosing to read post-apocalyptic fiction on purpose, wouldn't you? But this has been on my list for a long time.

I don't even have words for it right now, but it was pitch perfect, profound but never dull, important but never long-winded. It said what it needed to say and no more. ( )
  BraveNewBks | Mar 10, 2016 |
I thought this story was very well done and interesting.

There are significant changes between the story as it was written and the story for "Blade Runner". A primary focus in the book is the need that the remaining humans have to have an animal in their lives after so many of the animals became extinct due to the World War. If a person was unable to afford a "live" animal they could purchase an electric one. By having an animal, the humans were able to feel connected to something -- a major theme in the book is empathy.

In fact, it is through testing the levels of empathy exhibited by subjects that bounty hunters are able to determine if the subject is human or android. Since androids are not allowed on Earth, they are "retired" by the bounty hunters. In the story, the main character, Rick Deckard, is a bounty hunter sent to retire six androids.

I recommend this book for either apocalyptic or social sf. ( )
  bhabeck | Mar 6, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 291 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (62 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Dick, Philip K.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Brick, ScottNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dougoud, JacquelineTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Duranti, RiccardoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Goodfellow, PeterCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Michniewicz, SueCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Moore, ChrisCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Struzen, DrewCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wölfl, NorbertTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zelazny, RogerIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
And still I dream he treads the lawn,
walking ghostly in the dew,
pierced by my glad singing through.
~ Yeats
Dedication
To Tim and Serena Powers, my dearest friends
To Maren Augusta Bergrud
August 10, 1923 - June 14, 1967
First words
A merry little surge of electricity piped by automatic alarm from the mood organ beside his bed awakened Rick Deckard.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Wikipedia in English (4)

Book description
It was January 2021, and Rick Deckard had a license to kill.

Somewhere among the hordes of humans out there, lurked several rogue androids. Deckard's assignment--find them and then... "retire" them.

Trouble was, the androids all looked and acted exactly like humans, and they didn't want to be found!
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0345404475, Paperback)

"The most consistently brilliant science fiction writer in the world."
--John Brunner

THE INSPIRATION FOR BLADERUNNER. . .

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? was published in 1968. Grim and foreboding, even today it is a masterpiece ahead of its time.

By 2021, the World War had killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remained coveted any living creature, and for people who couldn't afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacrae: horses, birds, cats, sheep. . . They even built humans.

Emigrées to Mars received androids so sophisticated it was impossible to tell them from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans could wreak, the government banned them from Earth. But when androids didn't want to be identified, they just blended in.

Rick Deckard was an officially sanctioned bounty hunter whose job was to find rogue androids, and to retire them. But cornered, androids tended to fight back, with deadly results.

"[Dick] sees all the sparkling and terrifying possibilities. . . that other authors shy away from."
--Paul Williams, Rolling Stone

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:14 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

THE INSPIRATION FOR BLADERUNNER. . . Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? was published in 1968. Grim and foreboding, even today it is a masterpiece ahead of its time. By 2021, the World War had killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remained coveted any living creature, and for people who couldn't afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacrae: horses, birds, cats, sheep. . . They even built humans. Emigrees to Mars received androids so sophisticated it was impossible to tell them from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans could wreak, the government banned them from Earth. But when androids didn't want to be identified, they just blended in. Rick Deckard was an officially sanctioned bounty hunter whose job was to find rogue androids, and to retire them. But cornered, androids tended to fight back, with deadly results.… (more)

» see all 13 descriptions

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