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Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by…
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Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (1968)

by Philip K. Dick

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Blade Runner (1)

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14,204371251 (3.95)2 / 656
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English (348)  French (5)  Spanish (4)  Italian (4)  Swedish (2)  Polish (1)  Romanian (1)  Portuguese (1)  Catalan (1)  German (1)  Danish (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (370)
Showing 1-5 of 348 (next | show all)
My introduction to Philip K. Dick: I was very impressed. Dick creates a world where the only difference between androids and humans is that the latter has empathy for other creatures, except androids....or do they? ( )
  ghefferon | Mar 20, 2019 |
A solid 3.5, but I can't quite bump it up to 4 due to the last third, which fell into a few inconsistencies and unexplained elements (which in my opinion needed a bit more grounding for the story to work to its full potential). In addition, Rick Deckard's decisions later in the book sometimes don't seem to line up with his earlier motivations and I really don't understand the android romance ... why? how? what's the point?.

What I love: the first two thirds of the book, the tension, the masterfully sterile prose, the moments my sympathies were tugged unexpectedly. A classic for a reason and worth reading if you are (like me) exploring the sci-fi classics. ( )
  AmandaGStevens | Mar 2, 2019 |
Tras la guerra nuclear, la Tierra ha quedado sometida bajo una gran nube de polvo radioactivo. La gente ha emigrado a otros planetas del sistema y se ha llevado a androides que les asisten. Algunos de estos han escapado de la servidumbre y han vuelto ilegalmente a la Tierra. Y Rick Deckard, cazarrecompensas, es uno de los encargados de acabar con ellos. Los androides Nexus-6, los más avanzados, son casi humanos. La única manera de detectar su identidad artificial es un test que pone al descubierto su carencia de empatía. Pero ¿es justo acabar con los humanoides sóolo por el hecho de serño? ¿Cuál es el límite entre la vida artificial y la natural? Esta novela, que inspiró la película de culto de Ridley Scott, protagonizada por Harrison Ford, continúa siendo un referente y una vigente crítica a la sociedad actual, donde el hombre está cada vez más mecanizado y las máquinas cada vez más humanizadas. "Si alguien fuera a escribir una historia del futuro tal como lo ha soñado Hollywood durante años, el capítulo del día de mañana pertenecería, en gan parte, a Philip K. Dick". The Washington Post La novela que inspiró Blade Runner. Un clásico contemporáneo. ( )
  Henri-Fuentes | Feb 7, 2019 |
This is one of the most famous books of PKD, used as a basis for Bladerunner movie. The story follows the bounty hunter, who retires (kills) runaway androids for money in the post-apocalyptic world.
The novel is great if you read it as a dream/nightmare/trip, i.e. poetic but not always logically consistent. It grasps the reader and allows for great experiences (like doubting the reality around you), but if you start to pick on details you can see some ‘strangeness’, which can be intentional but most likely because the author didn’t care. As an example, which has no direct relation to the plot, so not a spoiler: there was a nuclear war and fallout and radioactive dust are the norm. The protagonist goes outside, returns covered in dust and neither he nor others do not much care for decontamination procedures.
One of the themes is spirituality/religion, which seems the hype in the 1960s, from[b:Stranger in a Strange Land|350|Stranger in a Strange Land|Robert A. Heinlein|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1156897088s/350.jpg|908211] to [b:Dune|234225|Dune (Dune Chronicles, #1)|Frank Herbert|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1434908555s/234225.jpg|3634639] to [b:Lord of Light|13821|Lord of Light|Roger Zelazny|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1330127327s/13821.jpg|1011388].
It is a very enthralling read, recommended for everyone interested in SF, especially the New Wave.
( )
  Oleksandr_Zholud | Jan 9, 2019 |
What would happen if a society's technological capability got so advanced, that it could build robots – androids, really – indistinguishable from humans? Would we have to keep close tabs on them, hunt down unregistered ones? Or would they be given the same rights as humans? Could a test even be designed to distinguish them from their biological creators? Would the androids even know they are not human? Would they want to? Could we fall in love with them and vice-versa?

This are some of the questions that this rightfully famous book deals with. I stress "deals with", not answers them - most are deliberately left open, as with all good philosophically–inclined fiction. I believe that agent Rick Deckard's mission to find rogue androids, escaped back to Earth from Mars, where most of humanity has migrated to, will remain a timeless classic even in a future society where the kind of world Dick describes is going to be close to reality. That is, if we make it that far. In Dick's world, the humans have mostly destroyed Earth in a nuclear war, but at least they got so far as to develop the technology to move to Mars instead of going extinct. We should be so lucky.

Comes with a bonus look at how a futuristic religion might look, which was very well done, indeed.
( )
  matija2019 | Jan 8, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 348 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (58 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Dick, Philip K.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Allié, ManfredTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brick, ScottNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dougoud, JacquelineTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Duranti, RiccardoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Frasca, GabrieleFsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Giancola, DonatoCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Goodfellow, PeterCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Michniewicz, SueCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Moore, ChrisCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pagetti, CarloPsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sleight, GrahamIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Struzen, DrewCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wölfl, NorbertTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zelazny, RogerIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
And still I dream he treads the lawn,
walking ghostly in the dew,
pierced by my glad singing through.
~ Yeats
Dedication
To Tim and Serena Powers, my dearest friends
To Maren Augusta Bergrud
August 10, 1923 - June 14, 1967
First words
A merry little surge of electricity piped by automatic alarm from the mood organ beside his bed awakened Rick Deckard.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
In 1968, Philip K. Dick wrote Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, a brilliant sf novel that became the source of the motion picture Blade Runner. Though the novel's characters and backgrounds differ in some respects from those of the film, readers who enjoy the latter will discover an added dimension on encountering the original work. Del Rey Books returned this classic novel to print with a movie tie-in edition titled Blade Runner: (Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?).
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Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
It was January 2021, and Rick Deckard had a license to kill.

Somewhere among the hordes of humans out there, lurked several rogue androids. Deckard's assignment--find them and then... "retire" them.

Trouble was, the androids all looked and acted exactly like humans, and they didn't want to be found!
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0345404475, Paperback)

"The most consistently brilliant science fiction writer in the world."
--John Brunner

THE INSPIRATION FOR BLADERUNNER. . .

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? was published in 1968. Grim and foreboding, even today it is a masterpiece ahead of its time.

By 2021, the World War had killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remained coveted any living creature, and for people who couldn't afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacrae: horses, birds, cats, sheep. . . They even built humans.

Emigrées to Mars received androids so sophisticated it was impossible to tell them from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans could wreak, the government banned them from Earth. But when androids didn't want to be identified, they just blended in.

Rick Deckard was an officially sanctioned bounty hunter whose job was to find rogue androids, and to retire them. But cornered, androids tended to fight back, with deadly results.

"[Dick] sees all the sparkling and terrifying possibilities. . . that other authors shy away from."
--Paul Williams, Rolling Stone

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:14 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

THE INSPIRATION FOR BLADERUNNER. . . Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? was published in 1968. Grim and foreboding, even today it is a masterpiece ahead of its time. By 2021, the World War had killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remained coveted any living creature, and for people who couldn't afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacrae: horses, birds, cats, sheep. . . They even built humans. Emigrees to Mars received androids so sophisticated it was impossible to tell them from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans could wreak, the government banned them from Earth. But when androids didn't want to be identified, they just blended in. Rick Deckard was an officially sanctioned bounty hunter whose job was to find rogue androids, and to retire them. But cornered, androids tended to fight back, with deadly results.… (more)

» see all 13 descriptions

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