Picture of author.

E. C. Bentley (1875–1956)

Author of Trent's Last Case

22+ Works 1,402 Members 52 Reviews

About the Author

Series

Works by E. C. Bentley

Associated Works

Lord Peter: The Complete Lord Peter Wimsey Stories (1968) — Contributor, some editions — 2,229 copies
Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama (1995) — Contributor, some editions — 929 copies
The Floating Admiral (1931) — Contributor — 813 copies
The Oxford Book of English Detective Stories (1990) — Contributor — 403 copies
Detective Stories (1998) — Contributor — 271 copies
Crime Stories from the Strand (1991) — Contributor — 227 copies
The Scoop & Behind the Screen (1930) — Contributor — 213 copies
The Omnibus of Crime (1929) — Contributor — 211 copies
Murder by the Book: Mysteries for Bibliophiles (2021) — Contributor — 177 copies
London After Midnight : A Tour of Its Criminal Haunts (1996) — Contributor — 138 copies
Alfred Hitchcock Presents: A Month of Mystery (1968) — Contributor — 121 copies
Serpents in Eden: Countryside Crimes (2016) — Contributor — 112 copies
The Best of Damon Runyon (1938) — Editor — 94 copies
The Mammoth Book of Great Detective Stories (1985) — Contributor — 81 copies
14 Great Detective Stories (1949) — Contributor — 58 copies
Selected Essays (1939) — Introduction, some editions — 58 copies
Tales of Detection (1940) — Contributor — 56 copies
Three famous murder novels (1941) — Contributor — 42 copies
More than Somewhat (1937) — Compiler — 36 copies
The Best Crime Stories Ever Told (2012) — Contributor — 35 copies
Great Short Stories of Detection, Mystery, and Horror (1928) — Contributor — 32 copies
Famous Stories of Code and Cipher (1965) — Contributor — 30 copies
The Boys' Second Book of Great Detective Stories (1940) — Contributor — 27 copies
Sporting Blood: The Great Sports Detective Stories (1942) — Contributor — 25 copies
The Black Lizard Big Book of Locked-Room Mysteries (2019) — Contributor — 24 copies
The Pocket Book of Great Detectives (1941) — Contributor — 22 copies
A Century of Detective Stories (1935) — Contributor — 20 copies
Ellery Queen's Twentieth Century Detective Stories (1964) — Contributor — 20 copies
Great detective stories (1998) — Contributor — 20 copies
Annual Macabre 1998 (1998) — Contributor — 14 copies
Ten Tales of Detection (1967) — Contributor — 14 copies
Detection Medley (1939) — Contributor — 8 copies
Chesterton, as seen by his contemporaries (1969) — Introduction, some editions — 8 copies
Thirteen Short Stories (1968) — Contributor — 5 copies
Verdens største detektiver II (1995) — Contributor — 5 copies
Verdens største detektiver I (1995) — Contributor — 4 copies
London After Midnight: A Conducted Tour, Part 2 (1996) — Contributor — 3 copies
Best Stories from Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine (1944) — Contributor — 2 copies
Great Stories of Detection (1960) — Contributor — 2 copies
The great detectives — Contributor — 1 copy
Essays of the year (1929-1930) (1930) — Contributor — 1 copy

Tagged

Common Knowledge

Members

Reviews

Carl Schwartz burst into the living room of the Moon Valley Ranch house with fire in his eye and pathos in his voice: "As sheur as I standing here am, dot schwein I'm going to kill "' "I'll jest bet yer a million dollars ter a piece o' custard pie yer don't," said Bud Morgan, rising from the lounge where he had been resting after a strenuous day in the big pasture. "I'll pet you," shouted Carl. "Der pig pelongs mit me der same as you." "Go ahead, then," said Bud, lying down again. "But I want ter tell yer this, and take it from me, it's ez straight ez an Injun's hair, yer kin kill yer own part o' thet hawg if yer want ter, but if my part dies I'll wallop yer plenty. I've spent too much time teachin' thet pig tricks ter lose it now." "Vich part der pig you own, anyvay?" "Ther best part; ther head.


*Not* the book of the film with Dan Radcliffe (!)

Published in 1913, ahead of the stock market crash, this is the story of the death of an American investor, found shot on beside his garden shed in peculiar circumstances.

We know - or at least think we know - the murderer by the middle of the book and the second part of the book is concerned with proving it and a side dish of love affair.

Lots of talking (and therefore bulks of text), decent police procedural for it's time
… (more)
 
Flagged
nordie | 34 other reviews | Oct 14, 2023 |
Carl Schwartz burst into the living room of the Moon Valley Ranch house with fire in his eye and pathos in his voice: "As sheur as I standing here am, dot schwein I'm going to kill "' "I'll jest bet yer a million dollars ter a piece o' custard pie yer don't," said Bud Morgan, rising from the lounge where he had been resting after a strenuous day in the big pasture. "I'll pet you," shouted Carl. "Der pig pelongs mit me der same as you." "Go ahead, then," said Bud, lying down again. "But I want ter tell yer this, and take it from me, it's ez straight ez an Injun's hair, yer kin kill yer own part o' thet hawg if yer want ter, but if my part dies I'll wallop yer plenty. I've spent too much time teachin' thet pig tricks ter lose it now." "Vich part der pig you own, anyvay?" "Ther best part; ther head.


*Not* the book of the film with Dan Radcliffe (!)

Published in 1913, ahead of the stock market crash, this is the story of the death of an American investor, found shot on beside his garden shed in peculiar circumstances.

We know - or at least think we know - the murderer by the middle of the book and the second part of the book is concerned with proving it and a side dish of love affair.

Lots of talking (and therefore bulks of text), decent police procedural for it's time
… (more)
 
Flagged
nordie | 34 other reviews | Oct 14, 2023 |
E C Bentley - [The Complete Clerihews]
Gavin Ewart in his introduction to The Complete Clerihews published in 1951 says of the author:

Bentley was an intelligent Gent - and by this I mean a well educated member of the English upper classes. - liberal and uncensorious in his instincts, a member of the Fabian society at Oxford (but also an enthusiastic rowing man).

He became famous for writing short witty poems, named after his own middle name, which were designed to amuse.

Charles Dickens
It was a pity about Dickens
Insane jealousy of chickens
And one could almost weep
At his morbid mistrust of sheep


A more formal definition of the Clerihew is: a humorous pseudo-biographical quatrain, rhymed in two couplets, with lines of uneven length more or less in the rhythm of prose. It is short and pithy, and often contains or implies a moral reflection of some kind. The name of the individual who is subject of the quatrain usually supplies the first line:

Geoffrey Chaucer
Took a bath in a saucer
In consequence of certain hints
Dropped by the Black Prince

Cervantes
The people of Spain think Cervantes
Equal to half a dozen Dantes
An opinion resented bitterly
By the people of Italy


Clerihews certainly enjoyed popularity and were ditties or poems that many people felt that they could have a go at - perhaps a bit like the Haiku today. As late as December 1980 the Weekend Competition in the New Statesman invited Clerihews on existing newspapers and magazines, and in 1981 the Sunday Times ran a clerihew competition.

Brahms
It only irritated Brahms
To be tickled under the arms
What really helped him compose
Was to be stroked on the nose

George Bernard Shaw
Mr George Bernard Shaw
Was just setting out for the war
When he heard it was a dangerous trade
And demonstrably underpaid


The Complete Clerihews which is apparently not complete is set out: one to a page with an amusing pen and ink illustration. Some of them refer to political or celebrity characters that have since faded into anonymity, but I loved them all, harmless fun with a sense of the absurd - 5 stars and I couldn't resist:

Mr Donald J Trump
Is really a bit of a chump
He once stood on the steps of the Capitol
But will soon disappear down a rabbit-hole.
… (more)
1 vote
Flagged
baswood | 4 other reviews | Aug 6, 2023 |
This was an ok book, albeit not great. Some financial magnate, Sigsbee Manderson was found shot dead on his estate. One of the newspapers sent off Philip Trent to report on the issue, and also to do a spot of investigating on his own part. He teams up, so to speak with Inspector Murch.

Initially, it appears it might be a case of suicide, but a lot of minor details seem to point otherwise. There seem to be lots of suspects, but none on which one can pin conclusive evidence. In particular, one person who might have been involved is Manderson's spouse, Mable Manderson. For some reason, Trent falls in love with Mable, so he can't finger her for any complicity. Eventually, it all comes out, but the final solution is quite differently from what people imagined, and because Manderson was such a despicable ass hat, no one gets convicted of anything in the end.

I'm not quite sure what my son saw in this book to have him recommend to me. As I said, it was ok, but nothing special. It would be ***-, were GoodReads to allow us s or -s on our ratings.
… (more)
 
Flagged
lgpiper | 34 other reviews | Jun 12, 2022 |

Lists

Awards

You May Also Like

Associated Authors

G.K. Chesterton Illustrator, Contributor

Statistics

Works
22
Also by
50
Members
1,402
Popularity
#18,311
Rating
3.8
Reviews
52
ISBNs
175
Languages
8

Charts & Graphs