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A Moveable Feast (1964)

by Ernest Hemingway

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
7,909164819 (3.97)1 / 453
Published posthumously in 1964, A Moveable Feast remains one of Ernest Hemingway's most beloved works. It is his classic memoir of Paris in the 1920s, filled with irreverent portraits of other expatriate luminaries such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein; tender memories of his first wife, Hadley; and insightful recollections of his own early experiments with his craft. It is a literary feast, brilliantly evoking the exuberant mood of Paris after World War I and the youthful spirit, unbridled creativity, and unquenchable enthusiasm that Hemingway himself epitomized.… (more)
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» See also 453 mentions

English (150)  Spanish (4)  Swedish (2)  Danish (2)  Hebrew (1)  Dutch (1)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  French (1)  Portuguese (Portugal) (1)  Catalan (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (165)
Showing 1-5 of 150 (next | show all)
In some ways a return to form after more than a decade of writing poor imitations of "the Hemingway style". He coyly gives the game away in his preface. Yes, it's fiction. The dialogue is some of the best he invented. The character "Hemingway" was one of the best protagonists he created. Yes, he rags on poor Scott, when Scott could no longer fight back, but is the portrait unfair for that? ( )
  HenrySt123 | Jul 19, 2021 |
nonfiction biographical essays (partially embroidered) about Hemingway's younger days in Paris spent with his first wife and various literary figures and other ex-patriated notables (which are sometimes not portrayed in a very flattering way). It's hard to feel sorry for a starving artist who lives in Paris with a roof over his head, especially when he is so frequently betting on horses and drinking, and who also has a sizeable ego. That said, Hemingway does have a way with evoking places and moods. ( )
  reader1009 | Jul 3, 2021 |
"Paris was always worth it and you received return for whatever you brought to it. But this is how Paris was in the early days when we were very poor and very happy."

Hemingway nails right there the cotter pin of "A Moveable Feast": "...whatever you brought to it." Whatever else this memoir is, it is the most clear-eyed and fair presentation of himself and his baggage as ever he wrote, and Paris serves as the living stage upon which his youth and the lives of his colleagues was playing out. The best aspects of this book are that the portions are small, they are direct and simple (some breath-taking, some charming), and the brazen near-toxic machismo that marked some of his later work is just not present. His likes and dislikes as people go are neither saccharine nor bitter, except for the frigid distrust he held for Zelda Fitzgerald.

The prose is lovely and evocative, unforced and direct. It really is. What an absolute joy this was to read. I really want to go back to Paris now, though. ( )
  MLShaw | Jun 18, 2021 |
Written with great brevity, Hemingway sets out not to describe but to simply write true accounts of his time spent writing in Paris, an interesting series of reflections from his time with Gertrude Stein to that with Fitzgerald. There was something refreshing about the way Hemingway penned this account, it felt like a series of short letters to the reader, nothing to throttle the senses, just tastes of another world, another life lived, and perhaps giving us scope to a wider picture of humanity, the artist, the movement of the world.

The Hemingway I have read, and because I have never been too sure about reading any Hemingway, I found this worked for me on its own level. ( )
  RupertOwen | Apr 27, 2021 |
Dedicating a chapter to discuss (at length) F Scott Fitzgerald's small penis must be the biggest dick move in literary history. I wonder in what way he must have had annoyed Hemingway to warrant this. Alternatively Hemingway must've become really petty at the end of his life. ( )
  Paul_S | Dec 23, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 150 (next | show all)
Important note!: this review is of the edition that Hemingway's grandson revised because he didn't like the original's contents. Hotchner argues for ignoring this edition in favor of the original.

"The grandson has removed several sections of the book’s final chapter and replaced them with other writing of Hemingway’s that the grandson feels paints his grandma in a more sympathetic light. Ten other chapters that roused the grandson’s displeasure have been relegated to an appendix."

"All publishers, Scribner included, are guardians of the books that authors entrust to them. Someone who inherits an author’s copyright is not entitled to amend his work. There is always the possibility that the inheritor could write his own book offering his own corrections. Ernest was very protective of the words he wrote, words that gave the literary world a new style of writing. Surely he has the right to have these words protected against frivolous incursion, like this reworked volume that should be called “A Moveable Book.” I hope the Authors Guild is paying attention."
 
He is gentle, wistful, and almost nostalgic. One writer friend once described Hemingway to me as "that bully" and in many ways my friend was right. Hemingway had created his own public personae that included a brusque way of conducting himself; of a kind of machismo that would be called out for what it was these days; and an insensitivity to other people that bordered on the cruel. A lot of that 'Grace under pressure" is crap, and in his better moments, Heminway probably knew that. But the stories in A Moveable Feast belie all that. He remembers those days in Paris with a fondness and kindness that is remarkable, considering his usual public displays.
 
Ernest was very protective of the words he wrote, words that gave the literary world a new style of writing. Surely he has the right to have these words protected against frivolous incursion, like this reworked volume that should be called “A Moveable Book.”
 
For that voice of a shattered Hemingway alone, the new edition of A Moveable Feast is worth taking note of. Otherwise, what I'm calling the "classic" edition is the more coherent narrative.
 
"Though this may seem at first blush a fragmentary book, it is not so. It should be read as a novel, belongs among the author's better works and is, as 'mere writing,' vintage Hemingway."
added by GYKM | editNew York Times, Lewis Galantiere (May 10, 1964)
 

» Add other authors (92 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Ernest Hemingwayprimary authorall editionscalculated
Demanuelli, ClaudeTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fritz-Crone, PelleTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hemingway, MaryIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hemingway, PatrickForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hemingway, SeánEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Saporta, MarcTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schuck, MaryCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Storm, ArieTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vandenbergh, JohnTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wildschut, MarjolijnAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life, it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast. --Ernest Hemingway to a friend, 1950
Dedication
First words
Then there was the bad weather.
Quotations
When I saw my wife again standing by the tracks...I wished I had died before I ever loved anyone but her.
But this is how Paris was in the early days when we were very poor and very happy.
Work could cure almost anything, I believed then, and I believe now. Then all I had to be cured of, I decided Miss Stein felt, was youth and loving my wife.
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Published posthumously in 1964, A Moveable Feast remains one of Ernest Hemingway's most beloved works. It is his classic memoir of Paris in the 1920s, filled with irreverent portraits of other expatriate luminaries such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein; tender memories of his first wife, Hadley; and insightful recollections of his own early experiments with his craft. It is a literary feast, brilliantly evoking the exuberant mood of Paris after World War I and the youthful spirit, unbridled creativity, and unquenchable enthusiasm that Hemingway himself epitomized.

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