HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

S.

by Doug Dorst, J.J. Abrams (Creator), V.M. Straka (Pseudonym)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
2,575794,896 (3.83)1 / 70
"A young woman picks up a book left behind by a stranger. Inside it are his margin notes, which reveal a reader entranced by the story and by its mysterious author. She responds with notes of her own, leaving the book for the stranger, and so begins an unlikely conversation that plunges them both into the unknown. The book: Ship of Theseus, the final novel by a prolific but enigmatic writer named V.M. Straka, in which a man with no past is shanghaied onto a strange ship with a monstrous crew and launched onto a disorienting and perilous journey. The writer: Straka, the incendiary and secretive subject of one of the world's greatest mysteries, a revolutionary about whom the world knows nothing apart from the words he wrote and the rumors that swirl around him. The readers: Jennifer and Eric, a college senior and a disgraced grad student, both facing crucial decisions about who they are, who they might become, and how much they're willing to trust another person with their passions, hurts, and fears."--Slipcase.… (more)
  1. 60
    House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski (PaulBerauer)
  2. 50
    Griffin & Sabine: An Extraordinary Correspondence by Nick Bantock (dizzyweasel)
    dizzyweasel: Interactive letter writing between two persons who become romantically involved without meeting. Real letters, postcards interspersed throughout.
  3. 20
    Forgotten Bookmarks: A Bookseller's Collection of Odd Things Lost Between the Pages by Michael Popek (Taphophile13)
    Taphophile13: A collection of actual items (letters, poems, photographs, of course, but some strange things too) found in books by a used bookstore owner.
  4. 10
    Marginalia by H.J. Jackson (2wonderY)
    2wonderY: Marginalia is a scholarly look at the phenomenon of margin notes.
  5. 00
    The Supernatural Enhancements by Edgar Cantero (darsaster)
  6. 00
    The Rule of Four by Ian Caldwell (Anonymous user)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

Group TopicMessagesLast Message 
 The Green Dragon: Geek alert! JJ Abrams & Doug Dorst book87 unread / 87Macumbeira, April 2014

» See also 70 mentions

English (74)  Italian (3)  Dutch (1)  German (1)  All languages (79)
Showing 1-5 of 74 (next | show all)
I listened to an interview with Doug Dorst after posting this 3 star review and, in light of new insights, will revisit the novel again in the future. Call it a pending 3 star. ( )
  MakebaT | Sep 3, 2022 |
More of an artifact than a literary work, a choose your own adventure for Generation X and Millennials, I found reading the novel as a literary work difficult because there was so much else going on with postcards and maps and memorabilia, lots of distractions which took me away from the primary narrative, and as a result, to my great shame, I found myself dismissing the novel, labouring to return to it, and in the end, leafed through it like some relic found in my grandfather's chest, rather than a work of fiction.

And more's the pity. I think the publication was more of an attempt to dazzle and market, rather than to present a well-crafted story. Might have better been marketed as a Mysterious Package than a literary work.

Still, if you like that sort of thing, I suspect you will very much enjoy this adventure. But for his aulde pharte, it just kind of fizzled. ( )
  fiverivers | Jul 21, 2022 |
As if an epic tale of shadow societies, institutionalized violence, war profiteering, ghostly pirate ships, obsidian islands, painful longing, and creepy descents into the unknown isn't enough, S. creates a parallel narrative that, though far less of a swashbuckling adventure, completes the story's theme. Convincing marginalia documents the relationship between a disengaged lit major and a jaded, arrogant graduate student who find each other through mutual fascination with the mysterious author of the aforementioned epic tale.

There isn't a plot in the traditional sense; instead, the book takes 450 pages or so to deal with the theme of identity. S., the protagonist of the novel-with-a-novel "The Ship of Theseus", emerges from the water into an unknown city. He has no memory of who he is, and spends the rest of the book trying to bring himself into focus as he goes about his various exploits as an accidental assassin. At every moment of extreme crisis (and there are many), he is saved, though "saved" is a questionable term, by a ramshackle ship with a deeply odd crew (think sewn-shut lips) who ferry him between horrible adventure after horrible adventure.

The question of the author's identity (one V.M. Straka) and his relationship with his translator is explained in a series of footnotes throughout the novel. The parallels between S. and Straka form the initial reason why the other two protagonists, Eric and Jen, begin their conversation. The evolution of their relationship and their research into the Straka question is documented through the changing colors of the ink in the margins. Even their nerdly, academic lives are touched, if not manipulated, by the dark exploits inherent in anything associated with "the S." and V.M. Straka.

This shit is complex and great fun to read. There are secret codes; there are letters and postcards a la Bantock's "Griffin and Sabine"; there are photocopies and maps on napkins; there is this wheel...thingy...that I still haven't figured out how to use. There's a secret code, see, that the reader has to figure out. And throughout the whole messy, beautiful thing, the concept of words as weapons, ink as blood, pervades.

10/10, will read again. ( )
1 vote MaryJeanPhillips | Jun 22, 2022 |
My baby is herrrre~~~ ♥
OMG IT'S SO GOOD TO LOOK AT *____*
  XSassyPants | Jun 11, 2022 |
S. La nave di Teseo - J. J. Abrams & Doug Dorst

Leggi la mia....
InstaRecensione!
Metti mi piace e aggiungimi se ti fa piacere!

È un piccolo capolavoro editoriale, un bellissimo oggetto, un gioco in solitaria, l'inferno di un pazzoide paranoico, non leggetelo se soffrite di ansia.
No, non fa paura, non è di certo il suo intento.
Ma ti ruba il cervello, ti strappa dalla realtà è ti porta nel mondo di Jen e Eric. Dire altro sarebbe spoiler.
È la riproduzione di un libro degli anni '40 di una biblioteca universitaria: leggendo le pagine del libro La nave di Teseo si viene catapultati nel mondo di Jen, la studentessa che lavora come bibliotecaria presso l'Università, e di Eric, quello che fin dall'inizio ci viene presentato come un ex dottorando al lavoro sullo studio del presunto autore del libro in questione: V. M. Straka. Il libro in sè racconta la storia di un uomo identificato solo della lettera S. che, colpito da un'amnesia che gli ha fatto dimenticare tutta la sua vita, viene trasportato su una nave in compagnia di una ciurma di misteriosi ed inquietanti compagni. Una storia intrisa di un mistero che cercano di risolvere i due "protagonisti" interagendo letteralmente sul bordo pagina alternandosi in un incessante botta e risposta che si svolge in almeno tre piani temporali. Sepolti tra le pagine del libro è affascinante trovare, fisicamente, cartoline, lettere, fotografie...

La lettura non è facile e non è rilassante: è lunga e impegnativa ed impone un attenzione esagerata per ogni singola pagina nell'affrontare ogni singolo argomento.
Per quanto mi riguarda l'ho trovata appassionante soprattutto all'inizio dopodiché la narrazione diventa piuttosto noiosa e ripetitiva per poi riprendersi incredibilmente e lasciare letteralmente a bocca aperta fino all'ultima pagina. ( )
  louchobi | May 12, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 74 (next | show all)
As viewers of the final episode of Lost know, Abrams has form in creating an addictive narrative and then disappointing at the end. And, despite delivering regular high-concept pleasures, S. is finally a brilliant piece of publishing rather than a wholly coherent rethinking of the novel.
added by amanda4242 | editThe Guardian, Mark Lawson (Nov 13, 2013)
 

» Add other authors (6 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Dorst, Dougprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Abrams, J.J.Creatormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Straka, V.M.Pseudonymmain authorall editionsconfirmed
Schnettler, TobiasTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schröder, BertTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
If found, please return to Workroom B19,
Main Library, Pollard State University. [in pencil]
Translator's Note
  And Foreword
          by
   F. X. Caldeira

               I.
Who was V.M. Straka?
Chapter 1

What Begins,
   What Ends

Dusk. The Old Quarter of a city where river meets sea.
Quotations
What begins at the water shall end there and what ends there shall once more begin.
Words are a gift to the dead and a warning to the living.
The story you walk into, he has learned, is always more complex than it first appears.
They're good questions, to be sure, but they have no answers, and at some point one chooses not to ask anymore.
But you ought to understand, too, that there's an attrition that takes place inside, one in which options and choices and even desires are ground ever smaller until finally their existence can no longer be confirmed by observation or weight or displacement but only by faith.  Until desire is a ghost.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Should not be confused or merged with S. [http://www.librarything.com/work/1379...] by John Updike.

-or with-

S. [http://www.librarything.com/work/1077...] by Slavenka Drakulic.
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

"A young woman picks up a book left behind by a stranger. Inside it are his margin notes, which reveal a reader entranced by the story and by its mysterious author. She responds with notes of her own, leaving the book for the stranger, and so begins an unlikely conversation that plunges them both into the unknown. The book: Ship of Theseus, the final novel by a prolific but enigmatic writer named V.M. Straka, in which a man with no past is shanghaied onto a strange ship with a monstrous crew and launched onto a disorienting and perilous journey. The writer: Straka, the incendiary and secretive subject of one of the world's greatest mysteries, a revolutionary about whom the world knows nothing apart from the words he wrote and the rumors that swirl around him. The readers: Jennifer and Eric, a college senior and a disgraced grad student, both facing crucial decisions about who they are, who they might become, and how much they're willing to trust another person with their passions, hurts, and fears."--Slipcase.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary
They say you never

read the same book twice, but this

might require it.

(legallypuzzled)

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.83)
0.5
1 6
1.5 1
2 21
2.5 6
3 65
3.5 16
4 115
4.5 10
5 83

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 179,940,061 books! | Top bar: Always visible