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The Travels of Marco Polo (1928)

by Marco Polo, Rusticiano da Pisa (Author)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4,448502,174 (3.58)92
First published in 1931. None of the manuscripts which have come down to us represent the original form of Marco Polo's narrative, but it is clear that certain texts are closer to the lost original than others. Entrusted with the task of preparing a new Italian edition of Marco Polo, Benedetto discovered many unknown manuscripts. He carefully edited the most famous of the manuscripts (the Geographic text) and collated it with the other best known ones. - An invaluable index has been added to Aldo Ricci's of Benedetto's text, which includes all the identifications made in the Geographic text and also later editions by Marsden (1818), Pauthier (1865) and Yule (1871). - The difficulty of following Polo on his many journeys has also been simplified by the process of distinguishing between those places on his main route to China and his return journey by sea to Persia and those places which he visited during his stay in China and those he never visited at all.… (more)
  1. 50
    The Travels of Ibn Battutah by Ibn Battutah (bookwoman247)
    bookwoman247: Both men traveled extensively in Medeival times. It's interesting to compare the two; one from a Western perspective, and one from a Middle Eastern /North African perspective.
  2. 10
    Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino (Jannes, Jannes)
  3. 10
    El libro de Marco Polo by Marco Polo (caflores)
  4. 00
    Marco Polo: From Venice to Xanadu by Laurence Bergreen (JGolomb)
  5. 01
    The Journeyer by Gary Jennings (Cecrow)
    Cecrow: Jennings tells 'the rest of the story' in this fictional work.
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» See also 92 mentions

English (35)  Dutch (4)  Spanish (3)  Italian (2)  Catalan (2)  Hungarian (1)  French (1)  Swedish (1)  All languages (49)
Showing 1-5 of 35 (next | show all)
MARCO?

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POLO!

If I never watched the Netflix show, I'd probably have little interest in this book. While this book is interesting, it's boring.

With that said I found the background history more entertaining. I suggest you find a biography or a history book on this topic first. I made that mistake. Or read the introduction. It's important to know that while Marco Polo get's full credit for this, it's pretty obvious he didn't fully write this all.

The best part of this and maybe the reason to read this book is when he starts talking about the Khans. It's interesting they didn't seem to mind Polo and Polo seemed to admire them and respect them. Unlike other explorers, all he was doing was observing and trading. He wasn't looking to convert, kill, or conquer people. However, I need to read more about Polo, because this is my impression after reading only this book.

Basically, yes this is a classic and yes this inspired others, but in my option it's not worth reading unless you are interested. Now to find other books about Marco Polo and the Khans. ( )
  Ghost_Boy | Aug 25, 2022 |
Have attempted to listen to this audio (downloaded from audible.co.uk) several but so far have had difficulty getting very far into it.[return][return]The narrator is distant and badly recorded - it sounds like he's recorded it down a phone line. The most animation in his voice comes when he stumbles over words he seems not to know but should have practised before recording. Italian in particular seems to be his sticking point - definately an issue when recording a narration of an Italian travelling to the far east! Otherwise his voice is flat and uninteresting - there is narely a breath or change in tone when announcing the chapter changes that happen on a regular basis and that could, nay should, be pulling the listener back to the recording. Instead, it becomes a background noise that is easily tuned out, and therefore missing the possibly fantastical story ( )
  nordie | Apr 18, 2022 |
Mui interessante olhar para o mundo desde a perspectiva daquela época. Ler um material em primeira mão fornece uma percepção mais acurada da realidade à época. ( )
  danielzonn | Mar 25, 2022 |
Polo’s way was paved by the pioneering efforts of his ancestors, especially his father, Niccolò, and his uncle, Maffeo. The family had traded with the Middle East for a long time, acquiring considerable wealth and prestige. Although it is uncertain if the Polos were of the nobility, the matter was of little importance in Venice, a city of republican and mercantile traditions.

Polo’s reticence concerning personal matters and the controversies surrounding the text, Polo’s reputation has suffered dramatic ups and downs. For some scholars, he was a brilliant young courtier, a man of prodigious memory, a most conscientious observer, and a successful official at the cosmopolitan court of the Mongol rulers. For others he was a braggart, a drifter ready to believe the gossip of ports and bazaars, a man with little culture, scant imagination, and a total lack of humour. Still others argue that he never went to China at all, noting that he failed, among other things, to mention the Great Wall of China, the use of tea, and the ideographic script of the Far East, and that contemporary Chinese records show no trace of Polo.

A more balanced view must take into account many factors, especially the textual problem and medieval ideas of the world. Modern scholarship and research have, however, given a new depth and scope to his work. It is generally recognized that he reported faithfully what he saw and heard, but that much of what he heard was fabulous or distorted. In any case, Polo’s account opened new vistas to the European mind, and as Western horizons expanded, Polo’s influence grew as well. His description of Japan set a definite goal for Christopher Columbus in his journey in 1492, while his detailed localizations of spices encouraged Western merchants to seek out these areas and break the age-old Arab trading monopoly. The wealth of new geographic information recorded by Polo was widely used in the late 15th and the 16th centuries, during the age of the great European voyages of discovery and conquest. ( )
  Marcos_Augusto | Oct 24, 2021 |
Fiction
  hpryor | Aug 8, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 35 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (120 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Polo, MarcoAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Rusticiano da PisaAuthormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Armiño, MauroEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Øye, AgneteTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Badel, Pierre-YvesEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bellonci, MariaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bertolucci Pizzorusso, Valeriasecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Blay, Frédéric LeEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bringsværd, Tor ÅgePrefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Camesasca, EttoreEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cardona, Giorgio RaimondoContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Carrera Díaz, ManuelEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Corbino, JonIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Della Valle, ValeriaAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dwiggins, W. A.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Friston, Adrian deIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Göransson, G.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gemme, Francis R.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gordon, WitoldIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Guignard, EliseTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Haakman, AntonTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Harris, PeterEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Joki, Aulis J.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jonckheere, KarelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Komroff, ManuelEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lapshin, Nikolai FodorovitchIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Latham, RonaldEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Malvano, Maria VittoriaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Marsden, WilliamTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Masefield, JohnIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Moule, Arthur ChristopherEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Painter, Douglas M.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pisa, Rustichello daAuthorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ricci, AldoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ronchi, GabriellaEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rossabi, MorrisEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rugoff, MiltonEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Segre, CesareForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Strizzi, SergioPhotographersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
t'Serstevens, AlbertTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tusseau, Jean-PierreTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Waugh, TeresaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wright, ThomasEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Yerasimos, StéphaneEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Yule, HenryTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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The Venetian Marco Polo is not only the most renowned traveler in world history, but he and his book have generated more speculation then almost any other person or volume in world literature.
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First published in 1931. None of the manuscripts which have come down to us represent the original form of Marco Polo's narrative, but it is clear that certain texts are closer to the lost original than others. Entrusted with the task of preparing a new Italian edition of Marco Polo, Benedetto discovered many unknown manuscripts. He carefully edited the most famous of the manuscripts (the Geographic text) and collated it with the other best known ones. - An invaluable index has been added to Aldo Ricci's of Benedetto's text, which includes all the identifications made in the Geographic text and also later editions by Marsden (1818), Pauthier (1865) and Yule (1871). - The difficulty of following Polo on his many journeys has also been simplified by the process of distinguishing between those places on his main route to China and his return journey by sea to Persia and those places which he visited during his stay in China and those he never visited at all.

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