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Silent Spring by Rachel Carson
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Silent Spring

by Rachel Carson

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4,543631,574 (4.01)172
  1. 20
    Our poisoned planet: can we save it? by Joseph Newman (Hedgepeth)
  2. 20
    Deep Green Resistance: Strategy to Save the Planet by Derrick Jensen (SonoranDreamer)
    SonoranDreamer: Deep Green Resistance is a book about a strategy for those who are frustrated with the ongoing poisoning of our planet even after all this time after Silent Spring was published.
  3. 10
    The War on Bugs by Will Allen (lemontwist)
  4. 00
    The Everglades: River of Grass by Marjory Stoneman Douglas (TheLittlePhrase)
  5. 01
    Sanctuary: The Story of Naturalist Mary Majka by Deborah Carr (ShelfMonkey)
  6. 01
    The Right to Be Cold: One Woman's Story of Protecting Her Culture, the Arctic and the Whole Planet by Sheila Watt-Cloutier (thebookpile)
    thebookpile: In Silent Spring, Rachel Carson says that to get away from contamination from DDT and other harmful chemicals one would have to move to the far north, which at that time wasn't exposed to them. Ironically, 60 years later, the situation is almost reversed, as described by Sheila Watt-Cloutier in The Right to Be Cold.… (more)
  7. 14
    Breasts: A Natural and Unnatural History by Florence Williams (changsbooks)
  8. 14
    Risk: The Science and Politics of Fear by Dan Gardner (Noisy)
    Noisy: Risk (Chapter 10) gives the counterpoint to Silent Spring, showing up the ignorance of probability and statistics embodied in the demonising of cancer. Rising relative rates of cancer - a disease of an aging population - also indicate a falling rate of diseases such as tuberculosis and enteritis.… (more)
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» See also 172 mentions

English (61)  German (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (63)
Showing 1-5 of 61 (next | show all)
Read a nice book and feel good. Nature is so beautiful.
"I'm not an ecologist. Do you think an ecologist is willing to violently hold someone down to sterilize them? What ecologists do isn't effective: overcome by technology. I am effective.
My idea for conservatism is a bit more extended: it comes down to 'can it actually change the world?' or just makes you feel good. You know: all these words that mean nothing. 'Significant words' in rallies and political speeches."

If you want something that could actually make an impact ( )
  Smithrin | Jun 9, 2019 |
My first read of this classic. It wasn't at all what I had expected. Based on environmental books that are popular today, I had expected lyrical descriptive nature writing. No. There's a little of that, but this is more like a compendium of dozens and dozens of investigative reports like you might find in the NY Times or Washington Post. All about chemical poisoning. That can be tedious, but it is also scary how regulation fails and can be suborned. I should probably start eating organic vegetables. Carson advocates strongly for importing insects to combat invasive insects, and she touts as a success when one introduced species is firmly established as a bulwark against an invasive species. As a non-expert, I'm not sure this perspective stands up well to time. Carson makes a good case for paying attention to the bigger picture, and not just going with the flow. ( )
  breic | Mar 18, 2019 |
(5) I have been attempting to read modern influential and/or classic non-fiction if there is such a genre - so this was on the list. I have very mixed feelings about it. On the one hand Carson explains the (fairly newly discovered!) Krebs's cycle so eloquently and precisely I wanted to print the chapter and make all medical students read it - Biochemistry that has plagued us all turned into literary magic! On the other hand, the book was repetitive and at times melodramatic. She had a very pedantic way about giving example after example of a certain effect of a chemical and how many parts per billion that was mind-numbing. But overall, this was definitely a frightening and effective treatise against the indiscriminate spraying of pesticides from planes that took place in the 1950's and earlier. (Does it still happen? I don't know. I had hoped the afterword would be more informative) An amazing accomplishment for a female scientist at that time. Indeed, much of the language she used displayed the prevalent gender norms - 'housewives' and 'medical men' were tossed out innumerable times.

It never ceases to amaze me how destructive Mankind is, the complete disregard for all life that is not human. (and then of course, some human life is more important than others.) I don't have much more to say - in truth, I really had to push to finish this and constantly kept looking at how many pages I had left. I think for me that is the biggest fault of this book - not particularly engaging. At one point I accidentally read a chapter through almost twice before I was sure that I had read it. It was that monotonous at times. Monotonous destruction . . . maybe that was her point. ( )
  jhowell | Jan 19, 2019 |
A scientifically passionate exposure of the effects of indiscriminate crop-dusting with insecticides, of the destruction of wild life and of the balance of nature, of man's progressive poisoning of his own habitat.
  GreeningAustralia | Sep 20, 2018 |
This is an amazing book: it really makes you think about what you can do to sustain our natural resources. ( )
  lrquinn | Jul 6, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 61 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (79 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Carson, Rachelprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Gore, AlIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hitchen, JonathanIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Huxley, JulianPrefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lear, LindaIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Matthiessen, PeterIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Shackleton, LordIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wilson, Edward O.Afterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
The sedge is wither'd from the lake,
and no bird sings. Keats.
I am pessimistic about the human race because it is too ingenious for its own good. Our approach to nature is to beat it into submission. We would stand a better chance of survival if we accommodated ourselves to this planet and viewed it appreciatively instead of sceptically and dictatorially. E B White.
Dedication
To Albert Schweitzer who said "Man has lost the capacity to foresee and to forestall. He will end by destroying the earth.'
First words
In a letter written in January 1958, Olga Owens Huckins told me of her own bitter experience of a small world made lifeless, and so brought my attention sharply back to a problem with which I had long been concerned. (Acknowledgments)
There was once a town in the heart of America where all life seemed to be in harmony with its surroundings. (1. A Fable for Tomorrow)
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Book description
Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring was first published in three serialized excerpts in the New Yorker in June of 1962. The book appeared in September of that year and the outcry that followed its publication forced the banning of DDT and spurred revolutionary changes in the laws affecting our air, land, and water. Carson’s passionate concern for the future of our planet reverberated powerfully throughout the world, and her eloquent book was instrumental in launching the environmental movement. It is without question one of the landmark books of the twentieth century.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0618249060, Paperback)

Rachel Carson's Silent Spring is now 35 years old. Written over the years 1958 to 1962, it took a hard look at the effects of insecticides and pesticides on songbird populations throughout the United States, whose declining numbers yielded the silence to which her title attests. "What happens in nature is not allowed to happen in the modern, chemical-drenched world," she writes, "where spraying destroys not only the insects but also their principal enemy, the birds. When later there is a resurgence of the insect population, as almost always happens, the birds are not there to keep their numbers in check." The publication of her impeccably reported text helped change that trend by setting off a wave of environmental legislation and galvanizing the nascent ecological movement. It is justly considered a classic, and it is well worth rereading today.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:58:38 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

First Published in 1962, Silent Spring alerted a large audience to the environmental and human dangers of indiscriminate use of pesticides, spurring revolutionary changes in the laws affecting our air, land, and water. "Silent Spring became a runaway bestseller, with international reverberations ... Even if she had not inspired a generation of activists, Carson would prevail as one of the greatest nature writers in American letters" (Peter Matthiessen, for Time's "100 Most Influential People of the Century"). This fortieth anniversary edition celebrates Rachel Carson's watershed book with new essays by the author and scientist Edward O. Wilson and the acclaimed biographer Linda Lear, who tells the story of Carson's courageous defense of her truths in the face of ruthless assault from the chemical industry in 1963, the year following the publication of Silent Spring and before her untimely death. First published by Houghton Mifflin in 1962, Silent Spring alerted a large audience to the environmental and human dangers of indiscriminate use of pesticides, spurring revolutionary changes in the laws affecting our air, land, and water. "Silent Spring became a runaway bestseller, with international reverberations . . . [It is] well crafted, fearless and succinct . . . Even if she had not inspired a generation of activists, Carson would prevail as one of the greatest nature writers in American letters" (Peter Matthiessen, for Time's 100 Most Influential People of the Century). This fortieth anniversary edition celebrates Rachel Carson's watershed book with a new introduction by the author and activist Terry Tempest Williams and a new afterword by the acclaimed Rachel Carson biographer Linda Lear, who tells the story of Carson's courageous defense of her truths in the face of ruthless assault from the chemical industry in the year following the publication of Silent Spring and before her untimely death in 1964.… (more)

» see all 15 descriptions

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Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141184949, 0141391529

Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

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