HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee (1970)

by Dee Brown

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
7,962118913 (4.27)309
Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee is Dee Brown's eloquent, fully documented account of the systematic destruction of the American Indian during the second half of the nineteenth century. A national bestseller in hardcover for more than a year after its initial publication, it has sold almost four million copies and has been translated into seventeen languages. For this elegant thirtieth anniversary hardcover edition, Brown has contributed an incisive new preface. Using council records, autobiographies, and firsthand descriptions, Brown allows the great chiefs and warriors of the Dakota, Ute, Sioux, Cheyenne, and other tribes to tell us in their own words of the battles, massacres, and broken treaties that finally left them demoralized and defeated. A unique and disturbing narrative told with force and clarity, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee changed forever our vision of how the West was really won.… (more)
  1. 71
    I Will Fight No More Forever: Chief Joseph and the Nez Perce War by Merrill D. Beal (myshelves)
  2. 51
    Our Hearts Fell to the Ground: Plains Indian Views of How the West Was Lost by Colin G. Calloway (eromsted)
    eromsted: Historical documents with academic introduction
  3. 20
    The Earth Is Weeping: The Epic Story of the Indian Wars for the American West by Peter Cozzens (Cecrow)
  4. 10
    Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto by Jr. Vine Deloria (Sandydog1)
    Sandydog1: Both are excellent overviews of US policy towards Native Americans.
  5. 10
    The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America by Thomas King (Cecrow)
  6. 10
    Little Big Man by Thomas Berger (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: A different perspective on the tragedy of the American West.
  7. 10
    Massacres in the jungle : Ixcán, Guatemala, 1975-1982 by Ricardo Falla-Sánchez (Muscogulus)
    Muscogulus: This book documents the systematic massacre of indigenous people in Guatemala in the more recent past.
  8. 00
    A Century of Dishonor by Helen Hunt Jackson (John_Vaughan)
  9. 00
    A long and terrible shadow : white values, native rights in the Americas, 1492-1992 by Thomas R. Berger (caballer)
  10. 00
    Son of the Morning Star by Evan S. Connell (John_Vaughan)
  11. 00
    The Earth Shall Weep by James Wilson (Cecrow)
  12. 00
    Touch the Earth: A Self Portrait of Indian Existence by T. C. McLuhan (dypaloh)
    dypaloh: An oral history expressing what was lost to North America’s first peoples after dispossession from their lands and cultures. The voices are sometimes despondent but most always eloquent.
  13. 01
    Black Hills/White Justice: The Sioux Nation Versus the United States : 1775 to the Present by Edward Lazarus (dkohler52)
  14. 02
    Custer by Larry McMurtry (Artymedon)
    Artymedon: Black Elk was at Wounded Knee and reenacted Little Big Horn in Buffalo Bill's show.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 309 mentions

English (110)  Spanish (2)  Dutch (1)  French (1)  All languages (114)
Showing 1-5 of 110 (next | show all)
Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee reveals a sordid little truth about human beings: they have a great capacity to be cruel, to be prejudiced against someone not like themselves, and to justify any kind of horrid behavior with a logic that defies belief. Having just read The Narrow Road to the Deep North, it would have been easy to say, “How could the Japanese be so cruel and inhuman?” And, how often have we asked that same question about the Germans toward the Jews, or Southerners against their black slaves, Hutus murdering Tutsis, or the British who watched the Irish die in the potato famines and refused to send aid? The treatment of Native Americans at the hands of Europeans and subsequent generations of Americans is no less despicable, no less harrowing, and no less shameful. In some ways other atrocities pale before it. It was genocide.

Unlike many, I am perfectly capable of placing historic events in the context of their times. I do not suffer from an inability to conceive that many modern ideas were foreign to our ancestors, that we have made progress (and, I should hope so), or that the masses were fed a steady diet of fear and propaganda that made extreme measures seem nothing less than reasonable to them. Still, I cannot imagine that any man who termed himself a Christian could have committed such acts of villainy and slept well at night or thought he would not have something beyond measure to answer for when he came before his maker. How few men protested or even attempted to intervene, and how calmly and coolly the tribes were promised a peace that was never intended, is the part of this story that most appalls me. That men such as Kit Carson, who had lived with these people, fathered children with Indian women, and spoke so highly of them as a race, could have been persuaded to join in the mass slaughter of them is incomprehensible.

I could go on, because the outrage feels very personal. The flag that Black Kettle stood under with his women and children huddled around him as the wholesale slaughter of his people began, a flag that he was promised would be his protection if he did not take arms against American troops, was my flag. It was red, white and blue. It was desecrated at that moment, and it is not too late for me to shed tears for that offence. What haunts me the most is that I think that seed of evil is still alive in mankind. It rears its ugly head all over the world today. We need to all be on guard against it. The lie that can be fashioned into truth is still a lie.
( )
  mattorsara | Aug 11, 2022 |
This was the hardest book I have ever read due to it being SO heartbreaking. The idea of people believing God gives them divine right to dominate and exterminate another race leaves me with a huge hole in my gut. It seems completely incredulous to think that anyone could so cold heartedly shoot, kill, brutalize, and mutilate another human being not just for being different but because you covet their territory? It is just so atrocious made even more so by claiming it’s being done in the name of a God who loves all. A story of the lust for power, broken promises, and a superiority complex that leads to treating others worse than filth.
Whole tribes... a whole nation, wiped out by greed and envy... it’s no wonder the collective unconscious fears aliens will come to earth and do to them what they did to the Native Americans... ( )
  savageknight | Jul 8, 2022 |
I picked up Dee Brown's "Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee" out of sheer curiosity from the local library. As an amateur historian preparing to write my own book, I was lapping up whatever histories I could find which followed oppressed minorities and the like.

From the first page, I was enthralled and stupefied. Irrespective of whatever snide allegations one can hurl at Brown, "Wounded Knee" wounds us all. It charts a history of avarice, betrayal and chauvinism- all such injustices inflicted upon the Native American peoples. What makes it distressingly poignant is that it is all true. Dee utilizes well referenced sources to portray that which we casually deny, our monstrosity towards the less fortunate and the seemingly weak.

Justice denied is justice delayed and for the Native Americans, centuries have elapsed in seeking redress. Many of their hounders are long dead, ceremoniously applauded by a Nation which has detained them on pecuniary stricken reservations.

But the beauty of "Wounded Knee" lies in what it leaves unsaid: the power of hope. A potent power for all indigenous peoples worldwide who are fighting to ameliorate their present for a better future.

"Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee" should be gifted to each and every political library worldwide. It is an insight into the minds of a resilient people refusing to be crushed by their past. A people whose struggles have become their chief source of pride. The leaders of tomorrow would do well to heed it and respect the indigenous nations of their own states. ( )
  Amarj33t_5ingh | Jul 8, 2022 |
It was a huge influence on my generation, revising the status quo historical account of the Euro dominated conquest of the Americas. Much has come since, but it came first. ( )
  RonSchulz | Jun 24, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 110 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Dee Brownprimary authorall editionscalculated
Curtis, Edward S.Photographersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Degner, HelmutTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gardner, GroverNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Knipscheer, JosTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sides, HamptonForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
I shall not be there. I shall rise and pass.

Bury my heart at Wounded Knee.

- (Stephen Vincent Benét)
Ik zal daar niet zijn. Ik zal mij oprichten en heengaan. Begraaf mijn hart bij de bocht van de rivier. (Stephen Vincent Benet)
Dedication
For Nicolas Brave Wolf
First words
It began with Christopher Columbus, who gave the people the name Indios.
Quotations
Americans who have always looked westward when reading about this period should read this book facing eastward.
Now they were all good Indians.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC
Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee is Dee Brown's eloquent, fully documented account of the systematic destruction of the American Indian during the second half of the nineteenth century. A national bestseller in hardcover for more than a year after its initial publication, it has sold almost four million copies and has been translated into seventeen languages. For this elegant thirtieth anniversary hardcover edition, Brown has contributed an incisive new preface. Using council records, autobiographies, and firsthand descriptions, Brown allows the great chiefs and warriors of the Dakota, Ute, Sioux, Cheyenne, and other tribes to tell us in their own words of the battles, massacres, and broken treaties that finally left them demoralized and defeated. A unique and disturbing narrative told with force and clarity, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee changed forever our vision of how the West was really won.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.27)
0.5 1
1 4
1.5
2 31
2.5 6
3 135
3.5 38
4 444
4.5 55
5 563

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 176,590,011 books! | Top bar: Always visible