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Out Stealing Horses (2003)

by Per Petterson

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3,9362352,292 (3.92)402
An early morning adventure out stealing horses leads to the tragic death of one boy and a resulting lifetime of guilt and isolation for his friend, in this moving tale about the painful loss of innocence and of traditional ways of life that are gone forever.
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» See also 402 mentions

English (216)  Dutch (5)  Danish (4)  Spanish (2)  German (2)  Swedish (2)  Norwegian (1)  Finnish (1)  Catalan (1)  French (1)  All languages (235)
Showing 1-5 of 216 (next | show all)
Borrowed from my sister Brenda. This book goes to my mom in Maine after we're done with it.

Just finished this sweet book. It was beautiful. I'd like to read the Norweigan (I speak Swedish, but haven't read much). Beautiful long sentences, such meat from the marrow of being alive and being in nature. Being a son, being a father. Being a boy, being an older man.

I'd like to read it again. This book goes to my wife, then Melissa, then maybe tina, then to my mom. Thanks Brenda! ( )
  wickenden | Mar 8, 2021 |
I put off reading this because of the title. I had it on my list because it's a "notable book", one that has received honors from several places. But the title made me think of...stealing horses....and I did not like the idea. I thought maybe it would be cowboyish, that horses would come in for some ill treatment.

But the title doesn't mean what it says. It has more than one meaning in the book, but neither has to do with actual stealing of horses.

Trond Sander, 67, has chosen to live the rest of his life alone, in a remote cabin in snowy Norway. He'd had his city life and family but now he just wants to be alone with his thoughts. And his dog.

His thoughts bring back memories of his youth, in particular the most significant events of that youth, the time his father left him. The young Trond, 15, is on vacation with his father for the summer. The two travel by train a long way to a cabin in the country, near the border with Sweden. His father had acquired the cabin long ago, initially a mystery to Trond because the family's finances had never been great. But he loves being there, working side by side with his father on the cabin, on other tasks, and just being there by himself. He becomes friends with a neighbor boy and the two do everything together, until one day Trond says something that triggers a response in the other boy, making him suddenly remote.

It isn't long before he discovers what caused his friend to go quiet. But although Trond had nothing to do with the tragedy, he has still lost a friend.

It is only later that pieces start to come together, glued by what a friend of his father's tells him. The story is both simplified and made more complex.

And now, in his later yet still fit years, Trond has chosen to live with nature. But it doesn't end there. He meets his nearest neighbor by chance and discovers that he actually knows him from those many years ago. In a way, the circle closes.

Elegantly and simply written, a story of love and loss. Isn't that what life is? ( )
  slojudy | Sep 8, 2020 |
This book has won a lot of awards, and it reminds me of Cormac McCarthy's writing. The main character lives by himself in a remote area and a lot of the story is him reflecting back on his life. There is a somber tone to the book, and it was good to listen to as an audiobook. If you like books with lots of action, it's not the book for you. Petterson though is an excellent storyteller and creates a believable world in frosty secluded environment of rural Norway. Some of the stories are quite humorous like the namesake of the book is about a shenanigan when the author was a boy. He and a friend went out at night to try to ride a neighbors horses with no tack. The boys try to decide if they are east or west of the Pecos, and then one boy jumps out of a tree onto a surprised horse, and crushes his private parts on the horses neck. Not really the great horse thieves of their imaginations. ( )
  kerryp | Jul 4, 2020 |
No doubt Out Stealing Horses has been reviewed thus:

Too many long sentences.

Or, to put it another way,

Who does he think he is, anyway, this Per Petterson, with his immodestly large sentences that have no inkling when to end, no brakes, no sensitivity to the situation of the poor reader who has drawn the most enormous amount of oxygen into their lungs, sucking it in until fit to burst, face red and bulging, in order to start at the beginning and be able to go through right to the end of just one of these sentences which one could call indecently long in their unconcern for the reader, gasping for air again when the end of one of these sentences is finally reached, because after all Petterson is no Shakespeare, and certainly no JK Rowling, who might have the right to inflict such sentences upon their readers.

Who does he think he is?

But for me it is like this:

rest here:


https://alittleteaalittlechat.wordpress.com/2015/10/21/out-stealing-horses-by-pe... ( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
No doubt Out Stealing Horses has been reviewed thus:

Too many long sentences.

Or, to put it another way,

Who does he think he is, anyway, this Per Petterson, with his immodestly large sentences that have no inkling when to end, no brakes, no sensitivity to the situation of the poor reader who has drawn the most enormous amount of oxygen into their lungs, sucking it in until fit to burst, face red and bulging, in order to start at the beginning and be able to go through right to the end of just one of these sentences which one could call indecently long in their unconcern for the reader, gasping for air again when the end of one of these sentences is finally reached, because after all Petterson is no Shakespeare, and certainly no JK Rowling, who might have the right to inflict such sentences upon their readers.

Who does he think he is?

But for me it is like this:

rest here:


https://alittleteaalittlechat.wordpress.com/2015/10/21/out-stealing-horses-by-pe... ( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 216 (next | show all)
 
Le Norvégien Per Petterson signe un magnifique roman sur les saisons de la vie, sur ces moments qui font que l'on n'est soudain plus le même.
 
added by NeueWelle | editLibération, Lindon Mathieu (Aug 31, 2006)
 
 

» Add other authors (12 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Petterson, Perprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Born, AnneTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Born, AnnePrefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sinding, TerjeIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Verner-Carlsson, JanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vikhagen, HåvardIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Für Trond T.
First words
Tidlig november.  Klokka er ni.  Kjøttmeisene smeller mot vinduet.  Noen ganger faller de og blir liggende i nysnøen og kave før de kommer seg på vingene igjen.  Jeg veit ikke hva jeg har som de vil ha.

Early November. It's nine o'clock. The titmice are banging against the window.
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I listen to the news, cannot break that habit...but it no longer has the same place in my life. It does not affect my view of the world as it once did.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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An early morning adventure out stealing horses leads to the tragic death of one boy and a resulting lifetime of guilt and isolation for his friend, in this moving tale about the painful loss of innocence and of traditional ways of life that are gone forever.

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