HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Galileo's Daughter: A Historical Memoir of Science, Faith, and Love (1999)

by Dava Sobel

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
6,0531071,408 (3.69)254
"The son of a musician, Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) tried at first to enter a monastery before engaging the skills that made him the foremost scientist of his day. Though he never left Italy, his inventions and discoveries were heralded around the world. Most sensationally, his telescopes allowed him to reveal a new reality in the heavens and to reinforce the astounding argument that the Earth moves around the Sun. For this belief, he was brought before the Holy Office of the Inquisition, accused of heresy, and forced to spend his last years under house arrest." "Of Galileo's three illegitimate children, the eldest best mirrored his own brilliance, industry, and sensibility, and by virtue of these qualities became his confidante. Born Virginia in 1600, she was thirteen when Galileo placed her in a convent near him in Florence, where she took the most appropriate name of Suor Maria Celeste. Her loving support, which Galileo repaid in kind, proved to be her father's greatest source of strength throughout his most productive and tumultuous years. Her presence, through letters which Sobel has translated from their original Italian and woven into the narrative, graces her father's life now as it did then." "Galileo's Daughter dramatically recolors the personality and accomplishment of a mythic figure whose seventeenth-century clash with Catholic doctrine continues to define the schism between science and religion. Moving between Galileo's grand public life and Maria Celeste's sequestered world, Sobel illuminates the Florence of the Medicis and the papal court in Rome during the pivotal era when humanity's perception of its place in the cosmos was being overturned."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 254 mentions

English (104)  Dutch (1)  Catalan (1)  Norwegian (1)  All languages (107)
Showing 1-5 of 104 (next | show all)
The title is misleading, this not so much about his daughter as his relationship with his daughter. His work as an astronomer and his support for Copernicus' theory of heliocentrism, which was thought to be heresy, brought him to the attention of the Roman Inquisition. His three children were born out of wedlock, two daughters and a son. Being illegitimate the daughters were not thought suitable for marriage so were given to the care of a convent. During Virginia's time there as Suor Maria Celeste, she wrote 124 letters to her father, which he kept. Sadly, his letters to her have been lost, presumed to have been destroyed by the convent when Suor Maria Celeste died aged 33. Apart from an obvious love for her father and the privations of the convent, the correspondence provides little information about her life, but shows a devout faith that Galileo obviously shared despite the accusations against him. Sobel provides a compassionate view of the scientist and describes the dramatic intrigue and conflict between science and religion. ( )
  VivienneR | Oct 8, 2022 |
This was a fine biography of Galileo that faltered in its attempts to make the letters from his daughter a centerpiece of the work. Sobel's translation of the letters and introduction of them to a wider audience was an important task to undertake, and the letters do provide many interesting and touching insights. However, many of the letter inclusions feel forced.

Overall, I enjoyed the book, and I learned a lot about Galileo and the history of our knowledge of the solar system. ( )
  eri_kars | Jul 10, 2022 |
This book was just okay. The title led me to believe it was about Galileo's daughter, but it was really a biography of Galileo told through letters between his daughter, who he had installed in a nunnery, and himself. A bit too long (455 pages) and a bit dry in places, however, church vs. science was interesting--again. ( )
  Tess_W | Apr 17, 2022 |
This book started off rather dry and I am pretty sure that I DNF'd it. ( )
  Robloz | Sep 23, 2021 |
I liked the historical aspects of the book, and the details of Galileo's life, discoveries, and experiments. The reading of letters he exchanged with his daughter really personalized his life story, and made for an iteresting approach to writing this book, but sometimes made the book drag a little for me. I found it fascinating, thinking about how carefully he had to balance the science he discovered against the religious beliefs of the day, and how he had to fight a one-man campaign to overturn the popular notions regarding an earth-centered universe. We consider ourselves members of an enlightend and educated world today, yet the book makes one think of the many similarities between the strict beliefs held by Religious fundamentalists within the Christian, Jewish, and Muslim communities today compared to the anti-scientific minds of those many hundreds of years ago. If it took the Church two hundred years to take his writings on the the earth rotating around the sun off the banned book list, it makes me wonder how many more years will have to pass for those conservative religious communities to accept what modern science has been demonstrating [b:in our time|280111|Holy Bible|Various|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1173381163s/280111.jpg|6405907].
( )
  rsutto22 | Jul 15, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 104 (next | show all)
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To the fathers
Galileo Galilei
&
Samuel Hillel Sobel, M.D.,
in loving memory.
First words
Most Illustrious Lord Father: We are terribly saddened by the death of your cherished sister, our dear aunt; but our sorrow at losing her is as nothing compared to our concern for your sake, because your suffering will be all the greater, Sire, as truly you have no one else left in your world, now that she, who could not have been more precious to you, has departed, and therefore we can only imagine how you sustain the severity of such a sudden and completely unexpected blow.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Information from the Portuguese (Brazil) Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (4)

"The son of a musician, Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) tried at first to enter a monastery before engaging the skills that made him the foremost scientist of his day. Though he never left Italy, his inventions and discoveries were heralded around the world. Most sensationally, his telescopes allowed him to reveal a new reality in the heavens and to reinforce the astounding argument that the Earth moves around the Sun. For this belief, he was brought before the Holy Office of the Inquisition, accused of heresy, and forced to spend his last years under house arrest." "Of Galileo's three illegitimate children, the eldest best mirrored his own brilliance, industry, and sensibility, and by virtue of these qualities became his confidante. Born Virginia in 1600, she was thirteen when Galileo placed her in a convent near him in Florence, where she took the most appropriate name of Suor Maria Celeste. Her loving support, which Galileo repaid in kind, proved to be her father's greatest source of strength throughout his most productive and tumultuous years. Her presence, through letters which Sobel has translated from their original Italian and woven into the narrative, graces her father's life now as it did then." "Galileo's Daughter dramatically recolors the personality and accomplishment of a mythic figure whose seventeenth-century clash with Catholic doctrine continues to define the schism between science and religion. Moving between Galileo's grand public life and Maria Celeste's sequestered world, Sobel illuminates the Florence of the Medicis and the papal court in Rome during the pivotal era when humanity's perception of its place in the cosmos was being overturned."--BOOK JACKET.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Inspired by a long fascination with Galileo, and by the remarkable surviving letters of Galileo's daughter, a cloistered nun, acclaimed writer Dava Sobel has written a biography unlike any other of the man Albert Einstein called "the father of modern physics—indeed of modern science altogether."

The son of a musician, Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) tried at first to enter a monastery before engaging the skills that made him the foremost scientist of his day. Though he never left Italy, his inventions and discoveries were heralded around the world. Most sensationally, his telescopes allowed him to reveal a new reality in the heavens and to reinforce the astounding argument that the Earth moves around the Sun. For this belief, he was brought before the Holy Office of the Inquisition, accused of heresy, and forced to spend his last years under house arrest. Of Galileo's three illegitimate children, the eldest best mirrored his own brilliance, industry, and sensibility, and by virtue of these qualities became his confidante. Born Virginia in 1600, she was thirteen when Galileo placed her in a convent near him in Florence, where she took the most appropriate name of Suor Maria Celeste. Her loving support, which Galileo repaid in kind, proved to be her father's greatest source of strength throughout his most productive and tumultuous years. Her presence, through letters which Sobel has translated from their original Italian and masterfully woven into the narrative, graces her father's life now as it did then.

Galileo's Daughter dramatically recolors the personality and accomplishment of a mythic figure whose seventeenth-century clash with Catholic doctrine continues to define the schism between science and religion.
Haiku summary

LibraryThing Early Reviewers Alum

Dava Sobel's book Galileo's Daughter was available from LibraryThing Early Reviewers.

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.69)
0.5
1 16
1.5 4
2 54
2.5 13
3 193
3.5 55
4 351
4.5 34
5 126

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 180,329,994 books! | Top bar: Always visible