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Herland (1915)

by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Charlotte Perkins Gilman's Utopias (2)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,254595,168 (3.44)158
COVER DESIGNS THAT COME TO LIFE! ANIMATE THE COVER WITH THE FREE INSERTED SHEET When three American men discover a community of women, living in perfect isolation in the Amazon, they decide there simply must be men somewhere. How could these women survive without man's knowledge, experience and strength, not to mention reproductive power? In fact, what they have found is a civilisation free from disease, poverty and the weight of tradition. All alone, the women have created a society of calm and prosperity, a feminist utopia that dares to threaten the very concept of male superiority. WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY LINDY WEST… (more)
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» See also 158 mentions

English (54)  Finnish (2)  Hungarian (1)  German (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (59)
Showing 1-5 of 54 (next | show all)
Academically interesting as feminism or speculative fiction history.
Pretty boring and dull as a bit of literature escapism. ( )
  mjhunt | Jan 22, 2021 |
Imagine a world without men. A world where women are able to reproduce without men, where the only children born are female, and where motherhood is all important. Now imagine that you are a young man in the early 1900s who hears about legends of such a community. Terry, Van and Jeff are those young explorers who cannot believe that such a land as Herland could possibly exist.

But exist it does, and they are taken in and learn all about this community that has been cut off from the rest of the world for over two thousand years.

I really wanted to enjoy this book, unfortunately it just didn’t quite do it for me. First of all the idealised Herland was just too perfect. I don’t believe that women are that perfect. And it was more of an anthropological study than a story. We spent the entire book learning about how Herland operated, and came into being.

Also I thought that Terry was just too horrible to be real. Even though I know that he isn’t, and that men who think like him still exist and most definitely did exist back in the 1900s. I just, well, I guess part of me doesn’t want to think that people can be so sexist.

I also objected to the prominence given to motherhood, as though that is all a woman should be interested in.

But a lot of my objections have more to do with the time it was written, and I have to be thankful for how far we have come. Of course we still have a long way to go, but better than we were, that’s for sure. ( )
  Fence | Jan 5, 2021 |
A feminist utopian novel written at the turn of the twentieth century. The book follows an expedition of three men who stumble upon a hidden land with only women. All the women/girls come from a single mother. The men find a land of milk and honey with no war, poverty, crime or violence. They wonder how this can be without the traditional "male characteristics" they feel would be essential to a perfect society. They try their hand at love (which the Herlanders are not averse to) but the women (and vice versa) lack some of the qualities they desire in a mate. Unique premise done well. ( )
  muddyboy | Sep 13, 2020 |
yes please can I go in the all-female utopia that developed without all the horrible competition and violence of our world. what is a capitalism ( )
  runtimeregan | Jun 12, 2019 |
While clearly not an inclusive utopia, I loved Herland's ideals of harmonious living. This classic introduced me to both utopian writings and feminist thought when I began my MAT. The ideas she introduces persuaded me that Constructivist teaching methods could be more useful than traditional teaching pedagogical methods. I loved the concept of all adults and children as a community of learners. Even though 'the sargents' were the de facto leaders.

Shira
MEOW Date: 9 September 12014 H.E. (Holocene/Human Era)
( )
  FourFreedoms | May 17, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 54 (next | show all)
Charlotte Perkins Gilmans Sozialutopie "Herland" ist ein reines Lehrstück. Die Figuren sind nicht plastisch gezeichnet, auch die Umgebung bleibt seltsam farblos. Es geht der Autorin offensichtlich vor allem darum, aufzuzeigen, welche Möglichkeiten in der weiblichen Hälfte der Menschheit stecken. Deshalb bleibt eine schwarz/weiß, gut/böse Einteilung nicht aus.
 

» Add other authors (55 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Charlotte Perkins Gilmanprimary authorall editionscalculated
Lane, Ann J.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wilhelm, SabineTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Charlotte Perkins Gilman is not ordinarily thought of as a humorist, but her feminist utopia, Herland, is a very funny book.
This is written from memory, unfortunately.
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We were not in the least "advanced" on the woman question, any of us, then.
They were inconveniently reasonable, those women.
They said: "With our best endeavors this country will support about so many people, with the standard of peace, comfort, health, beauty, and progress we demand. Very well. That is all the people we will make."
You see, they were Mothers, not in our sense of helpless involuntary fecundity, forced to fill and overfill the land, every land, and then see their children suffer, sin, and die, fighting horribly with one another; but in the sense of Conscious Makers of People.
We are used to seeing what we call "a mother" completely wrapped up in her own pink bundle of fascinating babyhood, and taking but the faintest theoretic interest in anybody else's bundle, to say nothing of the common needs of all the bundles. But these women were working all together at the grandest of tasks — they were Making People — and they made them well.
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COVER DESIGNS THAT COME TO LIFE! ANIMATE THE COVER WITH THE FREE INSERTED SHEET When three American men discover a community of women, living in perfect isolation in the Amazon, they decide there simply must be men somewhere. How could these women survive without man's knowledge, experience and strength, not to mention reproductive power? In fact, what they have found is a civilisation free from disease, poverty and the weight of tradition. All alone, the women have created a society of calm and prosperity, a feminist utopia that dares to threaten the very concept of male superiority. WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY LINDY WEST

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