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The Power

by Naomi Alderman

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
4,8682532,338 (3.74)1 / 296
In this stunning bestseller praised as "our era's Handmaid's Tale," a fierce new power has emerged--and only women have it (Washington Post).  In The Power, the world is a recognizable place: there's a rich Nigerian boy who lounges around the family pool; a foster kid whose religious parents hide their true nature; an ambitious American politician; a tough London girl from a tricky family. But then a vital new force takes root and flourishes, causing their lives to converge with devastating effect. Teenage girls now have immense physical power: they can cause agonizing pain and even death. And, with this small twist of nature, the world drastically resets. From award-winning author Naomi Alderman, The Power is speculative fiction at its most ambitious and provocative, at once taking us on a thrilling journey to an alternate reality, and exposing our own world in bold and surprising ways. "Captivating, fierce, and unsettling...I was riveted by every page. Alderman's prose is immersive and, well, electric." --New York Times Book Review… (more)
  1. 20
    Red Clocks by Leni Zumas (sturlington)
  2. 10
    Women's Work: The First 20,000 Years : Women, Cloth, and Society in Early Times by Elizabeth Wayland Barber (EerierIdyllMeme)
    EerierIdyllMeme: A book about achaeology giving evidence that common assumptions about gender roles are not borne out by the evidence, and a near future narrative framed as a story told from the far future based on archaeology exploring gender roles and possible far future assumptions about them.… (more)
  3. 00
    Shit Cassandra Saw by Gwen E. Kirby (Amy_Tector)
    Amy_Tector: A couple of the stories had a very "The Power" feel, but funnier.
  4. 00
    The Core of the Sun by Johanna Sinisalo (vwinsloe)
  5. 13
    The City & The City by China Miéville (charl08)
    charl08: Both books ask questions about what we take for granted in our everyday realtors..
  6. 14
    Animal Farm by George Orwell (kk1)
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Group TopicMessagesLast Message 
 Dystopian novels: The Power by Naomi Alderman8 unread / 8avaland, August 2019

» See also 296 mentions

English (250)  Italian (1)  Spanish (1)  All languages (252)
Showing 1-5 of 250 (next | show all)
Great read. Couldn’t put it down ( )
  vdt_melbourne | Jul 5, 2024 |
I've read more than 2/3 of the book, or rather, forced myself to, but I cannot do this anymore, it keeps getting worse, the writing is bland -to put it nicely- and after the 2/3 mark the triteness and artificiality of the dialogue took over and I could not do it anymore. I would not be this upset if this book was not a prize winner that has been received with SO MUCH HYPE. I rarely write disparaging reviews and if I do, they usually stay private, because why spread the negativity? After all, someone spent years on producing a written work and put effort and time and money into it. But there are so many great reads out there that remain unrecognised, unread by most people. They gather dust in used bookstores because they are out of print. Or they have a beautiful cover and are fresh out of the printer's but they are from a small press and barely sell and are forgotten after a few years because they are published in the age of bookstagram and amazon book shopping, a time when most people don't go out to discover random reads or receive recommendations from booksellers or friends, a time when small publishing companies don't sell copies and independent bookshops barely make ends meet if they survive at all. So what I'm trying to say so ineloquently is that I'm seething. THIS of all books won the women's prize a few years ago? It doesn't deserve it. The premise is great but ideas are not enough to constitute a good book; I have many ideas, can someone give me a prize for them please? ( )
  Louisasbookclub | Jun 30, 2024 |
I was not really enjoying this until it got to the epilogue, which kinda blew my mind. ( )
  bookwyrmm | May 25, 2024 |
I love the premise of this book—5 stars for the idea. I don’t love the execution. The way the author jumps around between characters leaves something to be desired; I feel this could’ve been done in a way that still leaves the reader invested in the outcome for each individual, but it didn’t happen for me. Also, personal preference, the violence and SA in particular turned the story sour pretty quickly. I get it as a plot device, but it was a lot. ( )
  jnoshields | Apr 10, 2024 |
I'm not sure I'll ever be able to stop thinking about this book. ( )
  rknickme | Mar 31, 2024 |
Showing 1-5 of 250 (next | show all)
Alderman [...] imagines our present moment — with our history, our wars, our gender politics — complicated by the sudden widespread manifestation of “electrostatic power” in women. Young girls wake up one morning with the ability to generate powerful electric shocks from their bodies, having developed specialized muscles — called “skeins” — at their collarbones, which they can flex to deliver anything from mild stings to lethal jolts of electricity. The power varies in its intensity but is almost uniform in its distribution to anyone with two X chromosomes, and women vary in their capacity to control and direct it, but the result is still a vast, systemic upheaval of gender dynamics across the globe.
 
Alderman has written our era's "Handmaid's Tale," and, like Margaret Atwood's classic, "The Power" is one of those essential feminist works that terrifies and illuminates, enrages and encourages.
added by melmore | editWashinton Post, Ron Charles (Oct 10, 2017)
 
The novel is constructed as a big, brash, page-turning, drug-running, globetrotting thriller, one in which people say things such as: “It’s only you I’ve blimmin come to find, isn’t it?” and “You wanna stand with me? Or you wanna stand against me?” But it’s also endlessly nuanced and thought-provoking, combining elegantly efficient prose with beautiful meditations on the metaphysics of power, possibility and change.
 

» Add other authors (12 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Alderman, Naomiprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Andoh, AdjoaNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bre, SilviaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Burton, NathanCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fenney, EmmaNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Judd, ThomasNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kurtto, MariannaKääNtäJä.secondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nightingale, PhilipNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stoddard, JustinePhotographersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Thiele, SabineTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
The people came to Samuel and said: Place a King over us, to guide us.

And Samuel said to them: This is what a King will do if he reigns over you: he’ll take your sons and make them run with his chariots and horses. He’ll dispose them however he wants: he’ll make them commanders of thousands or captains of fifties, he’ll send them to plough, to reap, to forge his weapons and his chariots. He’ll take your daughters to make perfume for him, or cook his food or do his baking. He’ll take your fields and your vineyards and your olive groves – oh, he’ll take the very best of those and give them to his cronies. He’ll take much more. A tenth of your grain and your wine – those will go to his favourite aristocrats and faithful servants. Your manservants and your maidservants, your best men, your donkeys – yes, he’ll take those for his own use. He’ll take one tenth of your flocks and you yourselves will become his slaves. On that day, believe me, you will cry out for relief from this King, the King you asked for, but the Lord will not answer you on that day.

But the people would not listen to Samuel. They said: No. Give us a King over us. So that we can be like all the other nations. Give us a King to guide us and lead us into battle.

When Samuel heard what the people said, he told it to the Lord.

The Lord answered, Give them a King.

1 Samuel 8
Dedication
For Margaret and for Graeme, who have shown me wonders
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Dear Naomi,
I've finished the bloody book.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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In this stunning bestseller praised as "our era's Handmaid's Tale," a fierce new power has emerged--and only women have it (Washington Post).  In The Power, the world is a recognizable place: there's a rich Nigerian boy who lounges around the family pool; a foster kid whose religious parents hide their true nature; an ambitious American politician; a tough London girl from a tricky family. But then a vital new force takes root and flourishes, causing their lives to converge with devastating effect. Teenage girls now have immense physical power: they can cause agonizing pain and even death. And, with this small twist of nature, the world drastically resets. From award-winning author Naomi Alderman, The Power is speculative fiction at its most ambitious and provocative, at once taking us on a thrilling journey to an alternate reality, and exposing our own world in bold and surprising ways. "Captivating, fierce, and unsettling...I was riveted by every page. Alderman's prose is immersive and, well, electric." --New York Times Book Review

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