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Animal Farm (1945)

by George Orwell, George Orwell (Author), George Orwell, George Orwell

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
59,86087916 (4)1151
Classic Literature. Fiction. HTML:

George Orwell's classic satire of the Russian Revolution has become an intimate part of our contemporary culture, with its treatment of democratic, fascist, and socialist ideals through an animal fable. The animals of Mr. Jones' Manor Farm are overworked, mistreated, and desperately seeking a reprieve. In their quest to create an idyllic society where justice and equality reign, the animals of Manor Farm revolt against their human rulers, establishing the democratic Animal Farm under the credo, "All Animals Are Created Equal." Out of their cleverness, the pigsâ??Napoleon, Squealer, and Snowballâ??emerge as leaders of the new community. In a development of insidious familiarity, the pigs begin to assume ever greater amounts of power, while other animals, especially the faithful horse Boxer, assume more of the work. The climax of the story is the brutal betrayal of Boxer, when totalitarian rule is reestablished with the bloodstained postscript to the founding slogan: "But Some Animals Are More Equal than Others."

This astonishing allegory, one of the most scathing satires in literary history, remains as fresh and relevant as the day it was published… (more)

  1. 612
    1984 by George Orwell (Phr33k, hpfilho)
    Phr33k: The theory behind the two books is the same, and if you enjoyed Animal Farm, you should read Nineteen Eighty-four
  2. 285
    Lord of the Flies by William Golding (mikeg2, sturlington)
  3. 111
    One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich by Alexander Solzhenitsyn (BeeQuiet)
    BeeQuiet: Whilst this book follows one day in the life of a Soviet prisoner in a gulag as opposed to merely a worker, this is still a stunning indictment of the revolution's disregard of human life.
  4. 60
    Darkness at Noon by Arthur Koestler (chrisharpe)
  5. 106
    Watership Down by Richard Adams (mcenroeucsb)
  6. 1410
    The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka (mariamreza)
    mariamreza: Another great use of allegory.
  7. 53
    Persepolis II: The Story of a Return by Marjane Satrapi (weener)
    weener: A good real-life example of what a repressive government can do.
  8. 20
    Fifteen Dogs: An Apologue by André Alexis (vancouverdeb)
    vancouverdeb: Both books use animals to illustrate human shortcomings and a base nature, animals gain human consciousness,both are allegories , and dystopian novels.
  9. 31
    Snowball's Chance by John Reed (infiniteletters)
  10. 31
    The Descendants of Cain (UNESCO Collection of Representative Works: European) by Sun-Won Hwang (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: Portrait of the mechanics and effect of Soviet-style communist takeover.
  11. 31
    Red Plenty: Industry! Progress! Abundance! Inside the Fifties Soviet Dream by Francis Spufford (lewbs)
    lewbs: Both books look at the shortcomings and hypocrisies of communism with some fine humor.
  12. 21
    Feed by M. T. Anderson (SqueakyChu)
  13. 32
    Utopian Tales From Weimar by Jack Zipes (aulsmith)
    aulsmith: Some of the stories in this anthology are earlier allegories with animals forming governments. The politics is just as sharp as Orwell's.
  14. 10
    Beasts of England by Adam Biles (Anonymous user)
    Anonymous user: A sequel to Animal Farm.
  15. 54
    The Road to Serfdom by F. A. Hayek (sirparsifal)
  16. 11
    Mort(e) by Robert Repino (ShelfMonkey)
  17. 12
    The Chocolate War by Robert Cormier (kaledrina)
  18. 36
    Utopia by Thomas More (luzestrella)
    luzestrella: marvelous!! definitively worth reading
  19. 06
    Bullshit Jobs: A Theory by David Graeber (Anonymous user)
    Anonymous user: Perspectives on labour.
  20. 110
    The Complete Maus by Art Spiegelman (mcenroeucsb)

(see all 22 recommendations)

1940s (1)
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» See also 1151 mentions

English (807)  Spanish (21)  French (6)  Italian (6)  Portuguese (5)  Dutch (5)  Portuguese (Brazil) (4)  Portuguese (Portugal) (3)  Hebrew (2)  Swedish (2)  Greek (1)  Esperanto (1)  Hungarian (1)  German (1)  Finnish (1)  Norwegian (1)  All languages (867)
Showing 1-5 of 807 (next | show all)
I went into this book knowing it was a politically driven story (I mean, hello, the forward tells you as much in the first place) but I found that even with that in mind, the story was still quite enjoyable. (I generally loathe all politically driven conversations; everyone’s too focused on swaying someone to their point of view to actually value another individual’s perspective. 
but that’s a whole other can of worms we can leave unopened at this time.) Most of the animal characters were developed off of existing political leaders, two or three people (in one character), or groups of people in the Russian Revolution at that time. I really, really enjoyed the irony of the ending and how perfectly it captured the corruption of socialist ideas in the hands of corrupt leadership. I almost wish I could have been alive to witness the effects of this allegory on the world. But then again, it might have been harder to get my hands on a copy then


And while I can see the depiction of the Russian Revolution and it’s components within this story, I also think that these characters and scenarios can transcend the intended allegory. Meaning it’s contents can be applied to more than just the Russian Revolution and it’s leaders, but to any nation in which leadership is corrupt and all powerful.

Anyway, Orwell’s writing was good – I would have liked it to be a touch more smooth and easy reading like, and it is a short book but you get a lot of detail and development from the story and it’s characters.

I definitely recommend reading it, if not for the historical nature of it then for the unique portrayal of the ideas held within.

Full review: https://wanderinglectiophile.wordpress.com/2018/02/14/mini-reviews-slaughterhous... ( )
1 vote RochelleJones | Apr 5, 2024 |
Orwell’s best work of fiction by some distance. It has the lightness of touch characteristic of his essays but otherwise absent from his novels. The narrative unfolds at a swift pace and with an organic inevitability. The characters are types, this is a fable after all, but Orwell uses his loyal carthorses, wise old donkeys and mindless sheep to moving effect. Animal Farm is short and brutal; unlike 1984, however, it leaves this reader feeling invigorated by Orwell’s artistry and clear-eyed vision, rather than bludgeoned into despair.

Is it about the tragedy inevitably brought by revolution? Or the tragedy of revolution betrayed? I think both interpretations are valid, though it would be an odd reader who concluded that the animals were wrong to rebel against Mr Jones. Despite his socialism there were strong elements of fatalism and pessimism in Orwell and they find clear expression here. It is also a book which could only have been written by someone with a profound, almost anarchistic, scepticism towards authority and ideology in all their forms.

Animal Farm was conceived as a book with a specific polemical purpose. Orwell wrote it to ‘expose the Soviet myth’: not to make the world safe for capitalism but to clear the way for genuine socialism. His timely intervention produced a work of timeless and universal relevance. Ultimately it isn’t about Soviet Russia. It speaks to our eternal need for liberation and how it is betrayed, not just by mendacious pigs, but our own misplaced faith in those who profess to lead us. ( )
2 vote gpower61 | Apr 4, 2024 |
Still a lovely fable. ( )
  Lokileest | Apr 2, 2024 |
Great book! ( )
  nyshkin | Mar 20, 2024 |
an easy read, ironic and scary ( )
  highlandcow | Mar 13, 2024 |
Showing 1-5 of 807 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (56 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Orwell, Georgeprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
George OrwellAuthormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Orwell, Georgemain authorall editionsconfirmed
Orwell, Georgemain authorall editionsconfirmed
Abella, RafaelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Baker, RussellPrefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Batchelor, JoyIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Blake, QuentinIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bradbury, MalcolmIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bulla, GuidoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cosham, RalphNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cotton, TomTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Crick, BernardIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Crick, BernardContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Davison, Peter HobleyForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gueillet, SuzonIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Halas, JohnIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Heuvelmans, TonAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
HOLTSCH, HeikeTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Low, JosephCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Miro, JoanCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Muggeridge, MalcolmIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pekkanen, PanuTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Quéval, JeanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rayyan, OmarCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Reher, LotharCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ross, AnthonyTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Scarpi, N.O.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Steadman, RalphIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sutton, HumphreyCover photographsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
SzĂ­jgyĂĄrtĂł, LĂĄszlĂłTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tasso, BrunoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tournaire, J.-P.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tucker, GeraldTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wahlén, JanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Walter, MichaelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Woodhouse, C. M.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
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Mr. Jones, of the Manor Farm, had locked the hen-houses for the night, but was too drunk to remember to shut the popholes.
Quotations
For once Benjamin consented to break his rule, and he read out to her what was written on the wall. There was nothing there now except a single Commandment. It ran:
ALL ANIMALS ARE EQUAL
BUT SOME ANIMALS ARE MORE EQUAL THAN OTHERS
Tha a h-uile creutair co-ionann ach tha cuid a chreutairean nas co-ionannaiche na cuid eile.
These people don't see that if you encourage totalitarian methods, the time may come when they will be used against you instead of for you. [from preface]
Make a habit of imprisoning Fascists without trial, and perhaps the process won't stop at Fascists. [from preface]
To exchange one orthodoxy for another is not necessarily an advance. [from preface]
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Classic Literature. Fiction. HTML:

George Orwell's classic satire of the Russian Revolution has become an intimate part of our contemporary culture, with its treatment of democratic, fascist, and socialist ideals through an animal fable. The animals of Mr. Jones' Manor Farm are overworked, mistreated, and desperately seeking a reprieve. In their quest to create an idyllic society where justice and equality reign, the animals of Manor Farm revolt against their human rulers, establishing the democratic Animal Farm under the credo, "All Animals Are Created Equal." Out of their cleverness, the pigsâ??Napoleon, Squealer, and Snowballâ??emerge as leaders of the new community. In a development of insidious familiarity, the pigs begin to assume ever greater amounts of power, while other animals, especially the faithful horse Boxer, assume more of the work. The climax of the story is the brutal betrayal of Boxer, when totalitarian rule is reestablished with the bloodstained postscript to the founding slogan: "But Some Animals Are More Equal than Others."

This astonishing allegory, one of the most scathing satires in literary history, remains as fresh and relevant as the day it was published

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Book description
The famous satire of the Russian Revolution by George Orwell is such a part of our present society that we often forget who wrote the original lines. It's the story of how Mr. Jones' Manor Farm becomes Animal Farm, a totally democratic society founded on the belief that all animals are created equal. In a slow evolution that bears an unsettling familiarity, the pigs Napoleon, Squealer, and Snowball emerge as leaders of the new community as a result of their cunning. The savage betrayal of the loyal horse Boxer culminates in the re-establishment of totalitarian control with the bloodstained postscript to the founding slogan: But Some Animals Are More Equal Than Others.
Haiku summary
"The old king is dead!
"The farm overflows with good things."
"We'll let you know."

(one-horse.library)
"Wake, Boxer, with cause!"
Friends offer snake-sly wisdom.
The wheel turns, grates on.

(one-horse.library)

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