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V for Vendetta (1982)

by Alan Moore (Writer), David Lloyd (Illustrator)

Other authors: Tony Weare (Illustrator)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: V For Vendetta (1-10)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
9,647185636 (4.17)280
A new trade paperback edition of the graphic novel that inspired the hit movie!A powerful story about loss of freedom and individuality, V FOR VENDETTA takes place in a totalitarian England following a devastating war that changed the face of the planet.In a world without political freedom, personal freedom and precious little faith in anything comes a mysterious man in a white porcelain mask who fights political oppressors through terrorism and seemingly absurd acts. It's a gripping tale of the blurred lines between ideological good and evil.This new trade paperbackedition features the improved production values and coloring from the 2005 hardcover.… (more)
Recently added bysauyadav, bvelto, HoboMonk, ejmw, alexandria2021, Arena800, private library, Mikalina
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» See also 280 mentions

English (173)  French (3)  Danish (3)  Swedish (2)  Indonesian (1)  Catalan (1)  Italian (1)  Spanish (1)  All languages (185)
Showing 1-5 of 173 (next | show all)
Modern day Guy Fawkes meets English Orwellian archetype Batman. This, I believe, is an apt description of V who pursues an anarchist vendetta against the infrastructures of political tyranny and totalitarianism.

Entrancing, masked, Vaudevillian and possessing a trademark sense of humor V never reveals his true self either mentally or physically rendering him more enigma than militant. Who is V? We experience him through the eyes of Evey Hammond, a timid government employee forced to confront her own delusions as she realizes the neo-fascist panorama under which she serves. We never really discover who V is even when he falls in battle. The unknown soldier. The silent warrior letting his valor speak after him through centuries beyond.

From a more tangible grounding, V is a symbolic place holder; a personification of anarchy and revolution in the face of tyranny. He is Camusian in the sense that rebellion, the very act of resistance, defines his being. He is revolutionary. Getting down and dirty; warring on the front lines while buttressing newfound recruits with the creed of chaos for it is out of total chaos that total order emerges and when that order atrophies chaos rears its head again.

The concepts presented in this singular graphic powerhouse are of epic proportions. There is a reason why V For Vendetta is the anarchist's newfound bible in a picturesque sense. Its relevancy is deeply rooted in the fact that materialism and pleasure have become the opiate of the masses today. Rarely are governments subject to soul searching or uprooting by conscientious individuals. The conscientious ones are lost in a haze of hedonism. V is the antithesis of this. Put profoundly, he is everything which we are not. ( )
  Amarj33t_5ingh | Jul 8, 2022 |
“People shouldn't be afraid of their government. Governments should be afraid of their people.” ~Alan Moore, V for Vendetta

I loved every minute of this graphic novel. I would love to find and read more graphic novels like this. ( )
  Christilee394 | Jan 29, 2022 |
Fantastic story and characters... the artwork has not aged well. Too dark and difficult to distinguish characters and the storyboarding was often hard to follow. ( )
  nrfaris | Dec 23, 2021 |
I always expect to be blown away when something has the sort of following this has but the second half seemed convoluted and uninteresting. I can see how this would have resonated in Thatcher’s Britain though. ( )
  fionaanne | Nov 11, 2021 |
I'd seen the movie and I've been curious about the book for a long time. This Fourth of July (how appropriate and ironic), I finally got Kate to trust me with her copy.

This is actually one case in which I'm glad I watched the movie first, because it allowed me to be swept up in a dark, complex world that I did not expect to find. The good characters--other than V himself--had very dark corners and complex motivations, and the bad characters weren't as powerful as they seemed (not that they were sympathetic, but they weren't simple). The story didn't end with the downfall of the tyrant, and the people weren't immediately free and happy. Perhaps it's just a result of having seen revolutions sweep the MENA region a few years ago, but I far preferred seeing the realistic riots break out and having V distinguish "chaos" from "anarchy" before the people began to settle down and figure out which way to go.

Best of all, Evey really grew, and we got to see her come into her own at the end of the story. She didn't have the passive role she did in the movie (Really, they cast Natalie Portman and then stripped down the character's growth? What's the point?) and I didn't get as much of a Phantom of the Opera tragic love story vibe, thank goodness. I also appreciated how young Evey was, and I wish that had stayed in the movie too. I think it's something often overlooked, that politics affects everyone, not just the pitiful little children or beaten-down old-for-their-age adults that "freer" countries so love to photograph. Here is someone who remembers the past, who lived through the change, who is growing and learning about this world, and who is going to share the responsibility of shaping the future.

The only thing that I did prefer in the movie (though I haven't seen it in years) was Stephen Fry's character. I kept waiting for the one person hiding in plain sight, the one person to represent those who'd been disappeared, the one person who tried to stand up with their own face, and I was disappointed. But thinking about that now, it fits. The lack breaks from conventional storytelling and hints at how far the government has infiltrated society (no one "different" managed to hide). And the fact that the little girl who graffitied did so without fear, without a mask, without a message, and without idolizing the single male figure who was going to "save" her and her whole world meant so much more in its directness. I'd love that page on my wall.

I'm afraid this review will have to be short, since it's now been almost a week since I finished and I haven't been able to read it twice, as I usually do with graphic novels. Thank you, Kate, for letting me read this! I've been wanting to for a long time, and it definitely didn't disappoint. ( )
1 vote books-n-pickles | Oct 29, 2021 |
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» Add other authors (9 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Moore, AlanWriterprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Lloyd, DavidIllustratormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Weare, TonyIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Berger, KarenEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Craddock, SteveLetterersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Crain, DaleDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dobbs, SiobhanColouristsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Whitaker, SteveColouristsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
First words
A few nights ago, I walked into a pub on my way home and ordered a Guinness.

Foreword.
Good evening, London. It's nine o' clock and this is the Voice of Fate broadcasting on 275 and 285 in the medium wave... It is the Fifth of the Eleventh, Nineteen-Ninety-Seven...
Quotations
Good night England. Goodnight Home Service and V for Victory. Hello the Voice of Fate and V FOR VENDETTA. --introduction
And it's no good blaming the drop in work standards upon bad management, either...though, to be sure, the management is very bad. We've had a string of embezzlers, frauds, liars and lunatics making a string of catastrophic decisions. This is plain fact. But who elected them? It was you! You who appointed these people! You who gave them the power to make your decisions for you! While I'll admit that anyone can make a mistake once, to go on making the same lethal errors century after century seems to me nothing short of deliberate. You have encouraged these malicious incompetents, who have made your working life a shambles. You have accepted without question their senseless orders. You have allowed them to fill your workspace with dangerous and unproven machines. You could have stopped them. All you had to say was 'no.' You have no spine. You have no pride. You are no longer an asset to the company
It does not do to rely too much on silent majorities, Evey, for silence is a fragile thing... One loud noise, and it's gone.
Since mankind's dawn, a handful of oppressors have accepted the responsibility over our lives that we should have accepted for ourselves. By doing so, they took our power. By doing nothing, we gave it away. We've seen where their way leads, through camps and wars, towards the slaughterhouse.
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Disambiguation notice
Please do NOT combine the novelization of the movie V for Vendetta with this, the graphic novel V for Vendetta, written by Alan Moore, illustrated by David Lloyd.
Publisher's editors
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Canonical LCC
A new trade paperback edition of the graphic novel that inspired the hit movie!A powerful story about loss of freedom and individuality, V FOR VENDETTA takes place in a totalitarian England following a devastating war that changed the face of the planet.In a world without political freedom, personal freedom and precious little faith in anything comes a mysterious man in a white porcelain mask who fights political oppressors through terrorism and seemingly absurd acts. It's a gripping tale of the blurred lines between ideological good and evil.This new trade paperbackedition features the improved production values and coloring from the 2005 hardcover.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Uma poderosa e aterradora história sobre a perda da liberdade e cidadania em um mundo totalitário bem possível, V de Vingança permanece como uma das maiores obras dos quadrinhos e o trabalho que revelou ao mundo seus criadores, Alan Moore e David Lloyd.

Encenada em uma Inglaterra de um futuro imaginário que se entregou ao fascismo, esta arrebatadora história captura a natureza sufocante da vida em um estado policial autoritário e a força redentora do espírito humano que se rebela contra esta situação. Obra de surpreendente clareza e inteligência, V de Vingança traz inigualável profundidade de caracterizações e verossimilhança, em um audacioso conto de opressão e resistência.
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