HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Yellow-Lighted Bookshop (2006)

by Lewis Buzbee

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,3277114,385 (3.89)67
HTML:

"I cannot remember when I read a book with such delight." —Paul Yamazaki, City Lights Bookstore
November, a dark, rainy Tuesday, late afternoon. This is my ideal time to be in a bookstore. The shortened light of the afternoon and the idleness and hush of the hour gather everything close, the shelves and the books and the few other customers who graze head-bent in the narrow aisles. I've come to find a book.
In The Yellow-Lighted Bookshop, Buzbee, a former bookseller and sales representative, celebrates the unique experience of the bookstore—the smell and touch of books, getting lost in the deep canyons of shelves, and the silent community of readers. He shares his passion for books, which began with ordering through The Weekly Reader in grade school. Interwoven throughout is a
fascinating historical account of the bookseller's trade—from the great Alexandria library with an estimated one million papyrus scrolls to Sylvia Beach's famous Paris bookstore, Shakespeare and Company, which led to the extraordinary effort to publish and sell James Joyce's Ulysses during the 1920s.
Rich with anecdotes, The Yellow-Lighted Bookshop is the perfect choice for those who relish the enduring pleasures of spending an afternoon finding just the right book.

. Biography & Autobiography. Nonfiction.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 67 mentions

English (69)  Spanish (1)  All languages (70)
Showing 1-5 of 69 (next | show all)
So...when can I buy my own bookshop?

I loved this fun and inspiring memoir about the author's experiences in various roles as book "pusher". Many of his experiences and memories were fun and relatable---like the one about the Weekly Reader. I remember my teachers using them as a reward. If we got our stuff done, then she'd hand out those or the Scholastic flyers and we'd spend the last half hour of the day looking through them. I'd forgotten about that anticipated joy until reading his similar memories. He also shared a neat anecdote about booksellers setting up outside the walls of European cathedrals during Medieval times. One can still visit the bookseller set up within the campus of Winchester Cathedral---outside the main walls of the cathedral. Just be sure to have cash as he doesn't accept a card!

Many of the stories he shared were fun to imagine---like Hemingway's contact "Bernard B." who smuggled banned books into the US in a very interesting way or Sylvia Beach who outsmarted the Nazis who tried to confiscate the contents of her Paris bookstore.

It was fun to read about his favorite bookstores around the world. My favorite here in NW Arkansas is Once Upon a Time Books in Tontitown. There are others that offer a more romantic atmosphere for book hunting, but OUTB has a huge selection of antique hardbacks at excellent prices. I always find treasures when I go there. My favorite overseas bookstore is The Minster Gate bookshop in York, England. It's got several floors of books arranged by subject and they're even stacked on the rickety stairs! The ghosts of many hundreds of years permeates that building---I can't wait to go back!

I was surprised by some of the statistics he shared. For instance, I didn't agree with his claim that 90% of people still go to a brick and mortar store to shop for books. I think the ease and selection of sites like Amazon make for a much larger percentage than
I'm glad I got a hold of this fun little book...but it really did make me want to own my own bookshop! ( )
  classyhomemaker | Dec 11, 2023 |
A book-lover's dream. ( )
  bookwrapt | Mar 31, 2023 |
OK account by a bookseller. ( )
  kslade | Dec 15, 2022 |
This delightful little book is part memoir, part history, and part gentle polemic. Buzbee started his career in the last great bookstore age, when the tech nerds busy creating the modern Internet depended on print books just as everybody else did. He seems (like me) always to have been in love with books: not just with particular books, or with the pleasures that reading books can bring, but with the very idea of books, not to mention with their feel, their look, their smell. He has much to share with other booklovers about how bookstores are run, and what it was to work in one (and is still, for a lucky few). Along the way he covers the history of books as we know them and of the vendors, stalls, and stores that sell them. Not surprisingly, he's worked not just as a bookstore employee but as a publisher's representative, and he has interesting stories about what that life is like, too.

I enjoyed every page of this book and read it very quickly. I'm sure that anybody who likes books at all would like it. ( )
  john.cooper | Mar 17, 2022 |
Pleasant and interesting until just past the middle when it went more into the business and less into history and memoir when it flattened out for me as if the author were more checking off the boxes he had to cover. Also, considering how much e-Books and Amazon in general has taken over the world, strongly nostalgic. It is sad to hear of all those no-longer-bookstores. ( )
  quondame | Aug 6, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 69 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
for my mother and father
First words
When I walk into a bookstore, any bookstore, first thing in the morning, I'm flooded with a sense of hushed excitement. I shouldn't feel this way. I've spent most of my adult life working in bookstores....
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

HTML:

"I cannot remember when I read a book with such delight." —Paul Yamazaki, City Lights Bookstore
November, a dark, rainy Tuesday, late afternoon. This is my ideal time to be in a bookstore. The shortened light of the afternoon and the idleness and hush of the hour gather everything close, the shelves and the books and the few other customers who graze head-bent in the narrow aisles. I've come to find a book.
In The Yellow-Lighted Bookshop, Buzbee, a former bookseller and sales representative, celebrates the unique experience of the bookstore—the smell and touch of books, getting lost in the deep canyons of shelves, and the silent community of readers. He shares his passion for books, which began with ordering through The Weekly Reader in grade school. Interwoven throughout is a
fascinating historical account of the bookseller's trade—from the great Alexandria library with an estimated one million papyrus scrolls to Sylvia Beach's famous Paris bookstore, Shakespeare and Company, which led to the extraordinary effort to publish and sell James Joyce's Ulysses during the 1920s.
Rich with anecdotes, The Yellow-Lighted Bookshop is the perfect choice for those who relish the enduring pleasures of spending an afternoon finding just the right book.

. Biography & Autobiography. Nonfiction.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.89)
0.5 1
1 1
1.5
2 11
2.5 8
3 68
3.5 20
4 113
4.5 22
5 72

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 206,023,238 books! | Top bar: Always visible