HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Stars My Destination (1956)

by Alfred Bester

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
5,2091411,450 (4.02)2 / 300
Gully Foyle, Mechanic's Mate 3rd Class, is the only survivor on his drifting, wrecked spaceship. When another space vessel, the Vorga, ignores his distress flares and sails by, Foyle becomes a man obsessed with revenge. He endures 170 days alone in deep space before finding refuge on the Sargasso Asteroid and then returning to Earth to track down the crew and owners of the Vorga. But, as he works out his murderous grudge, Foyle also uncovers a secret of momentous proportions.… (more)
Recently added byagh19, private library, minnesotaj, RyanMcGreer, Betelgeuse, mantouarty, mmsmcetc, B_R_Hughes
Legacy LibrariesLeslie Scalapino, Tim Spalding
  1. 160
    The Demolished Man by Alfred Bester (timspalding)
    timspalding: The rest of Bester isn't very good. These two are great.
  2. 70
    The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas père (sturlington)
    sturlington: Inspired The Stars My Destination.
  3. 41
    Ubik by Philip K. Dick (falls)
  4. 31
    Consider Phlebas by Iain M. Banks (EatSleepChuck)
  5. 00
    Join by Steve Toutonghi (47degreesnorth)
  6. 00
    Camp Concentration by Thomas M. Disch (Anonymous user)
  7. 03
    The Stars' Tennis Balls by Stephen Fry (pnorth)
    pnorth: Another book based on The Count of Monte Cristo but closer to the original than Bester's.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

English (138)  Italian (2)  Finnish (1)  All languages (141)
Showing 1-5 of 138 (next | show all)
Chaotic way of presenting the plot, a banal storyline having too much in common with 'The Count of Monte Cristo'. ( )
  nasko7 | Jul 24, 2020 |
Really mediocre. The cover promised that some people consider it the single best science fiction novel of all time. I don't know who those people are, but they're wrong. The book has positive attributes, in particular Bester's depiction of the social and economic chaos caused by an advance in human understanding resulting the ability of nearly everyone to teleport.

But as for the story, and the protagonist? The lead character is simply unbelievable. I don't buy him in the slightest. And the story is not terribly compelling. I've learned that good stories and characters have arcs. Note the word: it implies a certain smoothness, a continuity. No such thing exists here: the protagonist is a binary creature -- he begins the novel at point A and at some point he turns into point B, but we never see the change, we just see A and B. And the plot sort of proceeds the same way, in fits and starts, like a step function rather than a nice smooth continuous one. ( )
2 vote wearyhobo | Jun 22, 2020 |
Re-Read 6/5/17:

Reading this is like being on fire, snarling like a Tyger, and being the dumb brute and the intellectual mastermind at the same time. Reading it a second time is like chumming up with a psychopath and learning that he's really the good guy because everyone else is just as crazy as him.

And then, what else can we expect when practically everyone can Jaunte (teleport) practically anywhere they want? Society is radically changed in the next five hundred years, and it's not just the tech. It's the human mind and all their baser instincts let loose.

Still a fantastic tale. :)


Original review:

Wow. I can see now why this is considered one of the greats of sci-fi. It ought to be required reading for anyone setting out to know the history of the field and what sparked the imagination of so many other writers. The very ending was somewhat weak, but the climax was great. The emotions were the strongest part of the whole tale. Gut wrenching and visceral doesn't begin to describe it. Great setup, straightforward adventure/revenge tale, and a great twist. Loved it, loved it, loved it.

I just learned there *might* be a movie in development. Oh, my lord, I can't believe how excited I am about this.

It gets my heart pumping precisely eight times more than when I learned that Rama was in development.

SQUEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

(Ok. I'm not a little girl. But I FEEL like one, and isn't that what really counts?) ( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
**The Stars My Destination** by *Alfred Bester* is a scifi classic, and most of those don't work for me. This one was better than average, but I still felt like I was in a weird dream. Maybe it's just that my tolerance for people behaving horribly and/or stupidly is pretty low at the moment. I enjoyed the exploration of what the power of personal teleportation at a whim would do to society, and I laughed at the outrageously absurd parts of the novel, but the middle part felt like a drag, not due to lack of action, but due to the characters being weird/horrible/stupid or alternating between those three in rapid succession. ( )
2 vote _rixx_ | May 24, 2020 |
Las drogas son reales (y encima he tardado mil años en terminarlo) ( )
  feverell | May 19, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 138 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (82 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Bester, AlfredAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Adams, MarcCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bacon, C.W.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bing, JonAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bringsværd, Tor ÅgeAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Chesterman, AdrianCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dahl, Tor EdvinTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Doyle, GerardNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gaiman, NeilIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Giancola, DonatoCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Horen, MichaelCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Moore, ChrisCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Powers, Richard M.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sleight, GrahamIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stege, GiselaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
White, TimCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Tiger! Tiger! burning bright
In the forests of the night,
What immortal hand or eye
Could frame they fearful symmetry?
~ Blake
Dedication
To Truman M. Talley
First words
This was a Golden Age, a time of high adventure rich living and hard dying . . . but nobody thought so.
~ Prologue
He was one hundred and seventy days dying and not yet dead.
Quotations
He was Gully Foyle, the oiler, wiper, bunkerman; too easy for trouble, too slow for fun, too empty for friendship, too lazy for love.
"Vorga, I kill you filthy."
It was an age of freaks, monsters, and grotesques. All the world was misshapen in marvelous and malevolent ways.
Gully Foyle is my nameAnd Terra is my nation.Deep space is my dwelling place,The stars my destination.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Bester's original title, used in the UK editions, was "Tiger! Tiger!" (a reference to the Blake poem). In the US: "The Stars My Destination", was the original title used for the publication in Galaxy magazine.
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (4)

Gully Foyle, Mechanic's Mate 3rd Class, is the only survivor on his drifting, wrecked spaceship. When another space vessel, the Vorga, ignores his distress flares and sails by, Foyle becomes a man obsessed with revenge. He endures 170 days alone in deep space before finding refuge on the Sargasso Asteroid and then returning to Earth to track down the crew and owners of the Vorga. But, as he works out his murderous grudge, Foyle also uncovers a secret of momentous proportions.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
In a future where humans have learned how to teleport, provided they have previously physically seen their destination, Gully Foyle's is marooned in space, and he becomes obsessed with getting revenge after another spaceship passes him by.
Haiku summary
Don't mess with Gully.
He'll do whatever it takes
To fuck you over.

(Carnophile)

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.02)
0.5
1 13
1.5 5
2 58
2.5 29
3 228
3.5 85
4 465
4.5 97
5 464

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 150,857,803 books! | Top bar: Always visible