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The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They… (2015)

by Peter Wohlleben

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The Mysteries of Nature Trilogy (1)

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2,516804,599 (3.98)127
Are trees social beings? Forester and author Peter Wohlleben makes the case that, yes, the forest is a social network. He draws on groundbreaking scientific discoveries to describe how trees are like human families: tree parents live together with their children, communicate with them, support them as they grow, share nutrients with those who are sick or struggling, and even warn each other of impending dangers. Wohlleben also shares his deep love of woods and forests, explaining the amazing processes of life, death, and regeneration he has observed in his woodland.… (more)
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» See also 127 mentions

English (71)  German (4)  Dutch (2)  French (1)  Hungarian (1)  Danish (1)  All languages (80)
Showing 1-5 of 71 (next | show all)
لطالما اعتقدت أنه لا بد للأشجار أن تكون أكثر تطوراً مما تبدو عليه، خاصة أنها ظهرت منذ مئات ملايين السنين، وهي فترة كانت كافية للحيوانات أن تقوم بقفزات كبيرة على السلم التطوري، فجاء هذا الكتاب ليؤكد لي صواب اعتقادي.
يشرح عالم الحراجة والغابات الألماني بيتر ڤوليبن كيف "تتكلم" الأشجار مع بعضها عن طريق الرائحة والإشارات الكهربائية، وتنذر بعضها عند تعرضها لخطر الحشرات الآكلة للأوراق أو الحيوانات العاشبة، وكيف تعتني بالأشجار الضعيفة والمتضررة بتمرير الأغذية لها. يعطي أيضاً أمثلة عن تعدد "شخصيات" الأشجار وتعلمها من أخطائها بتخزين المعلومات في رؤوس جذورها، بالإضافة للتحالفات التي تعقدها مع أنواع حية أخرى كالفطريات والدبابير بما يعود عليها بالفائدة.

كتاب غني المحتوى، وباعث على الفضول والاهتمام بجوانب الحياة السرية للأشجار. ( )
  TonyDib | Jan 28, 2022 |
I want/wanted to read about trees. I started another tree book, [book:Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom of the Forest|54976983], and it was by someone from a logging family and I didn’t feel like reading a biography of a human/humans even if only a small part of the book and even this book starts off by a person who participated/participates in using trees. I got really tired of reading the sentences that start with or include “The forest I manage…” I’d love to read a tree book by an expert who is a pure nature lover and not someone whose current or past perspective includes trees for humans to use or to manage. Maybe [author:Bill McKibben|43861] was right though. Ever since I read his book [book:The End of Nature|1318899] in the 80s I’ve never been able to look at “nature” in the same way and maybe we’ve altered everything so much that we’re interconnected with trees to the point where we can’t be separated. I do wonder about the anthropomorphizing though. Maybe I will have to read that other book and hopefully more tree books to cross reference the information. I’m fascinated. Maybe I need to read a very recent and up to date botany book about trees.

Overall though this is a beautifully written book. The most interesting facts for me were the ones about the trees’/forests’ elaborate ecosystems.

Reading about natural forests makes me want to go see the redwoods or the sequoias and I’m afraid I’ll enjoy my local trees less than I have. Heavily managed and relatively recently planted, they could very well be hindered in being the “natural trees” we all like to assume they are.

The trees information is fascinating and I learned a lot. He seems to know his subject matter though I do also want to read other books about trees to hopefully cover some of the same material and maybe learn even more than I did from this book, which I have to say is a lot. He does care about various forest/trees ecosystems and describes them in detail. It really is amazing. There is sort of some nature left, even if not untainted by humans on the planet.

The (too few) black pen/ink illustrations of trees are lovely. There aren’t very many of them though. I read a Kindle e-edition borrowed from my public library so I don’t know if it has all the pictures that are in the paper edition(s).

To sum up: I wanted to love this book but it just did not work for me. I do have quibbles with some of what is presented and how it’s presented, but mostly it’s probably not the book’s fault. I was hoping to even better appreciate the trees in the parklands I see on a regular basis but what I’m left with is some curiosity still unsatisfied and some sadness. I think maybe what would work for me is an on-site class, perhaps a walking through the trees class with an expert good at teaching.

2-1/2 stars for this book, rounded down because my reading experience was disappointing. Not a good start to my 2022 reading year. I hope that things improve.

ETA: (in addition to correcting typos): Because of the way information is presented I’m not sure I can trust all of the facts. I need to read that other book and more books and information from legitimate sites on the web too. ( )
1 vote Lisa2013 | Jan 5, 2022 |
A book about -- you guessed it! -- trees, especially about the aspects of them that we humans tend not to perceive or appreciate. Trees, it turns out, are much more sophisticated, complicated organisms than meets the eye, especially when you consider them in the context of a forest or an ecosystem.

It's all really interesting subject matter, and I did learn some cool things, but I had decidedly mixed feelings about the book. Wohlleben gets, I think, a bit too repetitive on certain subjects, whereas with others he doesn't go into nearly as much scientific detail as I would like. (Although perhaps that's not too surprising. Not only is this book clearly meant to have a broad appeal, including to less science-y types, but Wohlleben himself is a forester, not a scientist.) He also does a lot of what I can only call anthropomorphizing, and while to a certain extent that's effective in making his point that trees are very much living things, not inanimate objects, he goes a bit further with it than I'm entirely comfortable with, and it leaves me with niggling doubts about the extent to which he might be letting sentiment trump science. ( )
  bragan | Oct 14, 2021 |
Genau wie unzählige Leser/Hörer vor mir, hat dieses Buch mich begeistert. Ein Grund sind sicherlich die vielen neuen Erkenntnisse über das "Wood Wide Web". Ein anderer die auch für Laien verständliche und bewusst emotionale Sprache, die Peter Wohlleben in seinem Buch verwendet. Etwas, wofür er - vor allem von den "Profis" im Forstbereich oft stark kritisiert wird. Mich persönlich hat die Art des Erzählens sehr angesprochen. Ich habe viel gelernt, fühlte mich noch während des Hörens gleich inspiriert einen Waldspaziergang zu machen, und mir direkt anzusehen, worüber Herr Wohlleben - nicht nur als Schreiber des gedruckten Buches, sondern auch als sehr angenehmer Sprecher des Hörbuchs - so anschaulich berichtet. Anzumerken wäre, dass ich das Hörbuch nicht in einem Rutsch durchhören konnte. Einem solchen Sachbuch zu lauschen ist in etwa, wie in einem 5-stündigen Seminar über Bäume und Wald zu sitzen. Es strömen eine Menge Informationen auf einen ein, und die wollen auch mal verarbeitet werden. Hörpausen waren also nötig. Ich denke, dies ist eines der (zugegeben wenigen) Büchern, die sich in gedruckter Form besser eigenen. Der Kauf des gedruckten Buches ist jedenfalls fest eingeplant. ( )
  Heidi64 | Jul 18, 2021 |
If a tree falls in the forest, Peter Wohlleben seems to suggest, listen for a woodland wake. This woodsman spares no effort to give that tree human qualities. It did't just make its presence felt, it lived a long life of service. Its patterns were locked not in the genes but in memory, and likely nursing a grudge or two. Do trees really look out for each other? I'm going with nature over nurture: It's enough to say trees do not thrive for long on their own. The mystery is not how trees learn this but why humans don't. The interdependence of the forest ecosystem is this book's lush understory. The thick canopy of anthropomorphism just throws shade.
  rynk | Jul 11, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 71 (next | show all)
Wohlleben's anecdotes are engaging, but sadly his book contains only a few.
added by MarthaJeanne | editNew Scientist, Sandrine Ceurstemont (Oct 29, 2016)
 

» Add other authors (43 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Peter Wohllebenprimary authorall editionscalculated
Billinghurst, JaneTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Flannery, TimForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kytömäki, AnniForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Simard, Dr. SuzanneAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tresca, CorinneTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Alle Natur, alles Wachsen, aller Friede, alles Gedeihen und Schöne in der Welt beruht auf Geduld, braucht Zeit, braucht Stille, braucht Vertrauen. (Hermann Hesse)
The Earth has its music for those who listen.
(William Shakespeare)
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Years ago, I stumbled across a patch of strange-looking mossy stones in one of the preserves of old beech trees that grows in the forest I manage.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Are trees social beings? Forester and author Peter Wohlleben makes the case that, yes, the forest is a social network. He draws on groundbreaking scientific discoveries to describe how trees are like human families: tree parents live together with their children, communicate with them, support them as they grow, share nutrients with those who are sick or struggling, and even warn each other of impending dangers. Wohlleben also shares his deep love of woods and forests, explaining the amazing processes of life, death, and regeneration he has observed in his woodland.

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