HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Hesiod, The Homeric Hymns and Homerica by…
Loading...

Hesiod, The Homeric Hymns and Homerica (1914)

by Hesiod, Homer (Author)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
251None45,610 (4.1)2
Recently added byprivate library, polymnia, lmv3, geoffmiles, lucas.schneider, sephibitchwitch, fotomicha, majystr
Legacy LibrariesRobert Ranke Graves
None

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 2 mentions

Showing 3 of 3
"2012-10-26 12:00:00"
  ColgateClassics | Oct 26, 2012 |
Hesiod ( /ˈhiːsiəd/ or /ˈhɛsiəd/;[1] Ancient Greek: Ἡσίοδος, Hēsíodos) was a Greek oral poet generally thought by scholars to have been active between 750 and 650 BC, around the same time as Homer.[2][3] His is the first European poetry in which the poet regards himself as a topic, an individual with a distinctive role to play.[4] Ancient authors credited him and Homer with establishing Greek religious customs.[5] Modern scholars refer to him as a major source on Greek mythology, farming techniques, early economic thought (he is sometimes identified as the first economist),[6] archaic Greek astronomy and ancient time-keeping.
Hesiod practised various styles of traditional verse, including gnomic, hymnic, genealogical and narrative poetry, but he was not able to manipulate them all fluently. Comparisons with Homer can be unflattering. As one modern scholar observed: "It is as if an artisan with his big, awkward fingers were patiently, fascinatedly, imitating the fine seam of the professional tailor."[7]
  gmicksmith | Jun 23, 2012 |
ok, proof that i'm a nerd: i love the formula of the hymns. ( )
1 vote heidilove | Feb 16, 2007 |
Showing 3 of 3
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (12 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Hesiodprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
HomerAuthormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Evelyn-White, Hugh G.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0674990633, Hardcover)

Hesiod (Hesiodus), an epic poet apparently of the eighth century BC, was born in Asia Minor but moved to Boeotia in central Greece. He was regarded by later Greeks as a contemporary of Homer.

Three works survive under Hesiod's name: (1) "Works and Days," addressed to his brother. In it he gives us the allegories of the two Strifes, and the myth of Pandora; stresses that every man must work; describes the accepted Five Ages of the world; delivers moral advice; surveys in splendid style a year's work on a farm; gives precepts on navigation; and propounds lucky and unlucky days. (2) "Theogony," a religious work about the rise of the gods and the universe from Chaos to the triumph of Zeus, and about the progeny of Zeus and of goddesses in union with mortal men. (3) "The Shield" (not by Hesiod), an extract from a "Catalogue of Women," the subject being Alcmena and her son Heracles and his contest with Cycnus, with a description of Heracles' shield. All three works are of great literary interest.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:43:50 -0400)

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
7 wanted1 free
9 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.1)
0.5
1
1.5
2 3
2.5 1
3 2
3.5
4 6
4.5
5 12

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 89,435,909 books! | Top bar: Always visible