HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking

by Malcolm Gladwell

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
19,158363181 (3.74)210
How do we think without thinking, seem to make choices in an instant--in the blink of an eye--that actually aren't as simple as they seem? Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept? Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others end up stumbling into error? And why are the best decisions often those that are impossible to explain to others? Drawing on cutting-edge neuroscience and psychology, the author reveals that great decision makers aren't those who process the most information or spend the most time deliberating, but those who have perfected the art of filtering the very few factors that matter from an overwhelming number of variables.… (more)
Recently added byFPCL, shonali, Vendola, private library, SteveJeffery, richfrasco, SalenaT, qjones08, GisselleT, dwbergstrom
Legacy LibrariesDavid Foster Wallace
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 210 mentions

English (352)  Spanish (4)  Dutch (2)  Romanian (1)  Swedish (1)  Hungarian (1)  Russian (1)  All languages (362)
Showing 1-5 of 352 (next | show all)
Grabbed this from my parents library Christmas 2021.
  SDWets | Jan 14, 2022 |
Good read. Didn't gain as much knowledge from it as expected, but still good. ( )
  nonames | Jan 14, 2022 |
3.5 *

This is Malcolm Gladwell's second book after [b:The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference|2612|The Tipping Point How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference|Malcolm Gladwell|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1473396980s/2612.jpg|2124255] and the second book of his I read in the space of a couple of weeks. Unsurprisingly, there are similarities in Gladwell's approach to his themes. He starts with an arresting anecdote, which he uses to introduce his subject. Then, after setting out the elements of his thesis, he addresses them one by one in the ensuing chapters, illustrating his points with intriguing examples, stories and references to psychological experiments.

In many ways, Gladwell's second book is even more ambitious than "The Tipping-Point". In the latter work, he sought to explain "cultural/social epidemics" or what makes a particular idea or product suddenly popular. In this book, he not only tries to explain what goes on in our minds when we make "snap judgments", but, as declared in the introduction "the third and most important task of this book is to convince you that our snap judgments and first impressions can be educated and controlled".

After reading the introduction, one would surely be forgiven for expecting this to be a "self-help book", a guide to harnessing the power of "thin slicing" or "making a little knowledge going a long way". The problem is that the book is nothing of the sort. Its initial message seems to be that "snap judgments" are great: art experts recognise forgeries when all evidence points to the contrary, a particular psychologist is able to predict the longevity of a marriage just by watching moments of a conversation between a couple - the list of such amazing examples just goes on. However, most of the book is then spent describing what can go wrong with snap judgments. And an awful lot can go wrong, apparently. Unconscious bias affects even the fairest of subjects, stress can turn us momentarily "autistic", some matters just cannot be assessed through "first impressions". The conclusion seems to be that there are no magic solutions to these shortcomings - except becoming experts in our respective fields, being conscious of our unconscious bias (and consciously trying to overcome it) and training to either avoid or get used to stressful situations.

There's no denying Gladwell's flowing and entertaining style and I will treasure some of the insights contained in the book (I was particularly struck by the evidence for "unconscious bias"). However, at the end of this read I felt somewhat let down.

Thinking without thinking? Think again... ( )
  JosephCamilleri | Jan 1, 2022 |
Riveting in some parts-- slightly long in others. However, I loved the examples. I've read John Gottman and now, based on this book, I want to study FACS. I also find it quite relevant to some of the current political concerns. ( )
  OutOfTheBestBooks | Sep 24, 2021 |
(49) This was an interesting book by an author I hear a lot about but that I have never read. It is sort of 'pop' psychology - taking about human behavior in an accessible way with lots of little interesting stories. This is about the power of our unconscious thinking and how it often knows a truth before our conscious brain does, or perhaps our conscious brain will never come to the same conclusion. I learned a great new phrase - 'paralysis through analysis' - I sure see a lot of that at my work. Just make a decision already!

While interesting, Gladwell then goes on to relay stories where unconscious thinking leads to disaster - death of innocent black people, discrimination against female musicians, etc. So then his thesis re: harnessing the power of your unconscious thinking starts to break down. I never felt he really presented a case for 'training' your unconscious and/or when to analyze and when to go with your gut so to speak. My 'gut' tells me this book gave me conflicting information.

I would potentially read this author again though I am not quite convinced that he is deserving of such popularity. After all, haven't we always known the things he set forth in this book. Sometimes your first impressions are the right ones, sometimes they are not. Not so mind-blowing after all. ( )
  jhowell | Sep 19, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 352 (next | show all)
Beyond question, Gladwell has succeeded in his avowed aim. Though perhaps less immediately seductive than the title and theme of The Tipping Point, Blink satisfies and gratifies.
 
If you want to trust my snap judgment, buy this book: you'll be delighted. If you want to trust my more reflective second judgment, buy it: you'll be delighted but frustrated, troubled and left wanting more.
 
"Blink" brims with surprising insights about our world and ourselves, ideas that you'll have a hard time getting out of your head, things you'll itch to share with all your friends.
added by stephmo | editSalon.com, Farhad Manjoo (Jan 13, 2005)
 
You can't judge a book by its cover. But Gladwell had me at hello — and kept me hooked to the final page.
 
As a researcher, Gladwell doesn't break much new ground. But he's talented at popularizing others' research. He's a clever storyteller who synthesizes and translates the work of psychologists, market researchers and criminologists.
added by stephmo | editUSA Today, Bob Minzesheimer (Jan 10, 2005)
 

» Add other authors (9 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Gladwell, Malcolmprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Gladwell, MalcolmNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To my parents, Joyce and Graham Gladwell
First words
In September of 1983, an art dealer by the name of Gianfranco Becchina approached the J. Paul Getty Museum in California. (Introduction)
Some years ago, a young couple came to the University of Washington to visit the laboratory of a psychologist named John Gottman.
Quotations
We have come to confuse information with understanding.
We live in a world that assumes that the quality of a decision is directly related to the time and effort that went into making it.
The key to good decision making is not knowledge. It is understanding. We are swimming in the former. We are desperately lacking in the latter.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC
How do we think without thinking, seem to make choices in an instant--in the blink of an eye--that actually aren't as simple as they seem? Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept? Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others end up stumbling into error? And why are the best decisions often those that are impossible to explain to others? Drawing on cutting-edge neuroscience and psychology, the author reveals that great decision makers aren't those who process the most information or spend the most time deliberating, but those who have perfected the art of filtering the very few factors that matter from an overwhelming number of variables.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.74)
0.5 8
1 73
1.5 27
2 267
2.5 69
3 1208
3.5 259
4 1769
4.5 116
5 981

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

Hachette Book Group

5 editions of this book were published by Hachette Book Group.

Editions: 0316172324, 0316010669, 1586217194, 1586217615, 0316011789

Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

» Publisher information page

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 166,171,257 books! | Top bar: Always visible