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French Women Don’t Get Fat

by Mireille Guiliano

Series: French Women (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,764425,224 (3.42)74
Cooking & Food. Health & Fitness. Nonfiction. HTML:Stylish, convincing, wise, funnyand just in time: the ultimate non-diet book, which could radically change the way you think and live.

French women dont get fat, but they do eat bread and pastry, drink wine, and regularly enjoy three-course meals. In her delightful tale, Mireille Guiliano unlocks the simple secrets of this French paradoxhow to enjoy food and stay slim and healthy. Hers is a charming, sensible, and powerfully life-affirming view of health and eating for our times.

As a typically slender French girl, Mireille (Meer-ray) went to America as an exchange student and came back fat. That shock sent her into an adolescent tailspin, until her kindly family physician, Dr. Miracle, came to the rescue. Reintroducing her to classic principles of French gastronomy plus time-honored secrets of the local women, he helped her restore her shape and gave her a whole new understanding of food, drink, and life. The key? Not guilt or deprivation but learning to get the most from the things you most enjoy. Following her own version of this traditional wisdom, she has ever since relished a life of indulgence without bulge, satisfying yen without yo-yo on three meals a day.

Now in simple but potent strategies and dozens of recipes youd swear were fattening, Mireille reveals the ingredients for a lifetime of weight controlfrom the emergency weekend remedy of Magical Leek Soup to everyday tricks like fooling yourself into contentment and painless new physical exertions to save you from the StairMaster. Emphasizing the virtues of freshness, variety, balance, and always pleasure, Mireille shows how virtually anyone can learn to eat, drink, and move like a French woman.

A natural raconteur, Mireille illustrates her philosophy through the experiences that have shaped her lifea six-year-olds first taste of Champagne, treks in search of tiny blueberries (called myrtilles) in the woods near her grandmothers house, a near-spiritual rendezvous with oysters at a seaside restaurant in Brittany, to name but a few. She also shows us other women discovering the wonders of French in action, drawing examples from dozens of friends and associates she has advised over the years to eat and drink smarter and more joyfully.

Here are a cultures most cherished and time-honored secrets recast for the twenty-first century. For anyone who has slipped out of her zone, missed the flight to South Beach, or accidentally let a carb pass her lips, here is a buoyant, positive way to stay trim. A life of wine, breadeven chocolatewithout girth or guilt? Pourquoi pas?.
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» See also 74 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 42 (next | show all)
I finished it last night and have mixed feelings. I thought the information, tips, philosophies, etc. were all great---just not so doable for the average American woman. Most of us don't live in places where we can walk to the market several times a week for groceries. Most of us can't afford to feed a family with the luxury wines, food, and chocolate she talked about. This book is not for the woman who has a significant amount of weight to lose (which IS the average American woman) and those who only have a minimal amount to lose probably already practice these no-brainer tips.

My biggest takeaway from the book was the reminder that I can say no to foods---even after they've been served to me. I don't have to finish everything on my plate. Better to toss it in the trash than wear it on my middle. ( )
  classyhomemaker | Dec 11, 2023 |
I liked the general idea of this book - slow down and actually enjoy the food you are eating instead of mindlessly shoving it into your mouth.
It made me look at my own bad habits (eating in front of the TV and not paying attention to what I was eating and actually enjoying it).
I found it worked for me, slowing down and savouring food made me eat less overall and more of the foods I enjoy. When visiting France hubby and I happily indulged in great food and walked everywhere, and at the end of it were slimmer, fitter and happier depsite all the pain au chocolats we had devoured. We also rarely snacked, and if we did, it was on a piece of fruit from a market stall. The French, regarding their view and culture of food, have it right in that respect.

But there were some parts, like the alcohol chapter, that felt outright self-promoting (she works for a champagne company...) ( )
  spiritedstardust | Dec 29, 2022 |
This is a book I periodically re-read, especially when I need to remind myself that pleasure does not need to be followed by pain. Aside from the excellentvadvice on jowca few simple changes can really add up, this book has many tasty recipes that I come back to time and again. ( )
  Cotswoldreader | Jun 22, 2022 |
This is an interesting comparison of the culture of eating between women in France and America. Giuliano offers the same good advice that my French friend has always followed. It makes sense. ( )
  VivienneR | Jun 17, 2022 |
Finally read this book. Unlike most American women, I have never been on a diet in my life and was pleasantly pleased to find that my eating habits are much like described in this book. Maybe that is why I have been "naturally thin" all my life. I am going to copy some of these recipes down and then share the book with others. ( )
  KyleneJones | Apr 25, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 42 (next | show all)
Guiliano ends the book with a list of more observations about French women. They don't weigh themselves, they don't snack all the time, they eat more fruit but would never give up their bread or other carbs. They dress to take out the garbage, they understand the importance of a good haircut and expensive perfume, they know love is slimming. Part of me wanted to throw the book across the room, while the other part was memorizing the list....At the very least, we would all do ourselves a favor to make like Colette, for whom the table was ''a date with love and friendship '' instead of the root of all evil.
 

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What is more important than the meal? Doesn't the least observant [wo]man-about-town look upon the implementation and ritual progress of a meal as a liturgical prescription? Isn't all of civilization apparent in these careful preparations, which consecrate the spirit's triumph over a raging appetite? - Valery
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I love my adopted homeland.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Cooking & Food. Health & Fitness. Nonfiction. HTML:Stylish, convincing, wise, funnyand just in time: the ultimate non-diet book, which could radically change the way you think and live.

French women dont get fat, but they do eat bread and pastry, drink wine, and regularly enjoy three-course meals. In her delightful tale, Mireille Guiliano unlocks the simple secrets of this French paradoxhow to enjoy food and stay slim and healthy. Hers is a charming, sensible, and powerfully life-affirming view of health and eating for our times.

As a typically slender French girl, Mireille (Meer-ray) went to America as an exchange student and came back fat. That shock sent her into an adolescent tailspin, until her kindly family physician, Dr. Miracle, came to the rescue. Reintroducing her to classic principles of French gastronomy plus time-honored secrets of the local women, he helped her restore her shape and gave her a whole new understanding of food, drink, and life. The key? Not guilt or deprivation but learning to get the most from the things you most enjoy. Following her own version of this traditional wisdom, she has ever since relished a life of indulgence without bulge, satisfying yen without yo-yo on three meals a day.

Now in simple but potent strategies and dozens of recipes youd swear were fattening, Mireille reveals the ingredients for a lifetime of weight controlfrom the emergency weekend remedy of Magical Leek Soup to everyday tricks like fooling yourself into contentment and painless new physical exertions to save you from the StairMaster. Emphasizing the virtues of freshness, variety, balance, and always pleasure, Mireille shows how virtually anyone can learn to eat, drink, and move like a French woman.

A natural raconteur, Mireille illustrates her philosophy through the experiences that have shaped her lifea six-year-olds first taste of Champagne, treks in search of tiny blueberries (called myrtilles) in the woods near her grandmothers house, a near-spiritual rendezvous with oysters at a seaside restaurant in Brittany, to name but a few. She also shows us other women discovering the wonders of French in action, drawing examples from dozens of friends and associates she has advised over the years to eat and drink smarter and more joyfully.

Here are a cultures most cherished and time-honored secrets recast for the twenty-first century. For anyone who has slipped out of her zone, missed the flight to South Beach, or accidentally let a carb pass her lips, here is a buoyant, positive way to stay trim. A life of wine, breadeven chocolatewithout girth or guilt? Pourquoi pas?.

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