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The Diary of a Nobody (1892)

by George Grossmith, Weedon Grossmith (Author)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
3,105833,786 (3.72)1 / 322
Since its first publication in 1892, this delightful Victorian comic diary has never been out of print. City clerk Charles Pooter asks: ?Why should I not publish my diary...because I do not happen to be a ?somebody? He proceeds to catalog all the social clangers he makes unwittingly as he bumbles his way through life, yet sympathy develops for Pooter in the face of it all. The classic ?English Humor? of The Diary of a Nobody is an ideal text for the talents of Martin Jarvis.… (more)
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 It's a LondonThing: Diary of a nobody5 unread / 5bric, April 2007

» See also 322 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 83 (next | show all)
I can imagine that this book was an absolute banger when it was first written and as considered by its target audience. I found it quite humorous and fun, but not being a middle class English suburbanite in the late 1800's, I'm sure that a lot of the humor was lost on me. It was a nice little diversion nonetheless. ( )
  AliceAnna | Nov 25, 2022 |
The keeper of the Diary of a Nobody is Charles Pooter, a married, middle-aged, lower-middle-class clerk in 1890s London who leads an entirely mundane life. I can see how the style of gentle, slightly sentimental observational comedy that George and Weedon Grossmith pioneered here would have been successful, even innovative, at the time of its first publication. I have slightly more trouble understanding how it's still in print today as anything other than a bit of social history. I could see where the jokes were, I just didn't find them particularly funny. ( )
  siriaeve | Nov 24, 2022 |
I don't fancy let's condescend to be amused at the clueless narrator approach to humor. At least it was short. ( )
  quondame | Jul 8, 2022 |
Not sure I'd have read this if it hadn't been a gift, but this is a re-read, and it's great for filling a gap. Pooter's a suitably embarrassing pair of eyes to see through, though the Grossmith brothers do let him end his and his wife Carrie's tale well, and take you with him on your way. A delightful humble paddle in suburban England towards the turn of the century. Who needs Jerome K Jerome... ;-) ( )
  emmakendon | Jul 6, 2022 |
Captures the obsessions and anxieties of the Victorian middle-class very well, but its humour now seems too earnest and dated - a little like the works of Samuel Clemens. ( )
  sfj2 | Jul 2, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 83 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (22 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Grossmith, Georgeprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Grossmith, WeedonAuthormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Bailey, PaulIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Glinert, EdIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Grossmith, WeedonIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Irwin, MichaelEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jarvis, MartinNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lawrence, JohnIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Palmer, GeoffreyNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Remes, Maija-LeenaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Squire, J. C.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Williams, William EmrysEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
THE DIARY OF A NOBODY
originally appeared in Punch
and is re-published by permission of the publishers
Messrs Bradbury and Agnew
The Diary has been since considerably added to
The excellent title was suggested
by our mutual friend
F. C. BURNAND
to whom we have
the great pleasure of dedicating this volume
GEORGE GROSSMITH
WEEDON GROSSMITH
London, June, 1892
First words
My dear wife Carrie and I have just been a week in our new house, "The Laurels," Brickfield Terrace, Holloway -- a nice six-roomed residence, not counting basement, with a front breakfast-parlour.
Quotations
He may wear what he likes in the future, for I shall never drive with him again. His conduct was shocking. When we passed Highgate Archway, he tried to pass everything and everybody. He shouted to respectable people who were walking quietly in the road to get out of the way; he flicked at the horse of an old man who was riding, causing it to rear; and, as I had to ride backwards, I was compelled to face a gang of roughs in a donkey-cart, whom Lupin had chaffed, and who turned and followed us for nearly a mile, bellowing, indulging in coarse jokes and laughter, to say nothing of occasionally pelting us with orange-peel.
"It was mentioned in the Bicycle News."
I told Sarah not to bring up the blanc-mange again for breakfast. It seems to have been placed on our table at every meal since Wednesday… In spite of my instructions, that blanc-mange was brought up again for supper. To make matters worse, there had been an attempt to disguise it, by placing it in a glass dish with jam round it...I told Carrie, when we were alone, if that blanc-mange were placed on the table again I should walk out of the house.
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Wikipedia in English (1)

Since its first publication in 1892, this delightful Victorian comic diary has never been out of print. City clerk Charles Pooter asks: ?Why should I not publish my diary...because I do not happen to be a ?somebody? He proceeds to catalog all the social clangers he makes unwittingly as he bumbles his way through life, yet sympathy develops for Pooter in the face of it all. The classic ?English Humor? of The Diary of a Nobody is an ideal text for the talents of Martin Jarvis.

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Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0140437320, 0241956862

 

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