HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Feast of the Goat (2000)

by Mario Vargas Llosa

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
2,731763,971 (4.12)1 / 332
Publisher description: It is 1961. The Dominican Republic languishes under economic sanctions the Catholic church spurs its clergy against the government from its highest ranks down, the country is arrested in bone-chilling fear. In The Feast of the Goat, Vargas Llosa unflinchingly tells the story of a regime's final days and the unsteady efforts of the men who would replace it. His narrative skates between the rituals of the hated dictator, Rafael Trujillo, in his daily routine, and the laying-in-wait of the assassins who will kill him their initial triumph and the shock of fear's release--and replacements. In the novel's final chapters we learn Urania Cabral's story, self-imposed exile whose father was Trujillo's cowardly Secretary of State. Drawn back to the country of her birth from 30 years after Trujillo's assassination, the widening scope of the dictator's cruelty finds expression in her story, and a rapt audience in her extended family. In The Feast of the Goat, Vargas Llosa weighs the burden of a corrupt and corruptive regime upon the people who live beneath it. This is a moving portrait of an unrepentant dictator and the unwilling citizens drawn into his orbit.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

» See also 332 mentions

English (55)  Spanish (10)  Dutch (3)  Swedish (2)  French (2)  Portuguese (Portugal) (1)  German (1)  Catalan (1)  Danish (1)  All languages (76)
Showing 1-5 of 55 (next | show all)
This is political science porn. Though not in the same sense of, say, House of Cards. This is not about complex machinations or smart people. This is about fear and ordinary people. One day you're a trusted intimate of the Generalíssimo. The next day he wakes up on the wrong side of the bed; suddenly you're no longer senator, your bank accounts are frozen, you're under investigation. You wonder what it is you've done. You worry you may get arrested. You worry about your family. You wonder if there is anything you can do to regain the man's favor.

This is also violence porn. King Joffrey is a clumsy little bully apprentice compared to Trujillo. The violence is not gratuitous though. It's one thing to learn from Wikipedia that this many people were killed, that that many people were tortured, etc. It's another thing entirely to turn the victims of the regime into relatable characters and to make the reader care about them. And Vargas Llosa does that brilliantly here.

Also, shout out to the narrators of the Audible version. They did an amazing job.

It doesn't get five stars is because it could be shorter. After a certain point it feels like "enough, I got the picture, Trujillo was mean and people lived in fear." There was no need to tie every loose end. ( )
  marzagao | Jun 1, 2021 |
This novel has long chapters and moves between three different, but linked, stories. We meet Urania, who has returned to the Dominican Republic after many years away. Her father is dying and her cousins and aunt wonder why she has had no contact in all those years. Other chapters spend time in the head of Rafael Trujillo, the dictator. This is unpleasant and difficult to read. The third narrative involves the people plotting to kill Trujillo. Urania's story takes a distressing turn that she describes in painful detail and it is this story that really held my attention. ( )
  CarolKub | Nov 21, 2020 |
This fictionalised account of the last days of Trujillo, the feared and fanatical ruler of the Dominican Republic, is interspersed with the story of Urania, a 49-year-old lawyer who escaped the island when she was fourteen. Urania's father was one of Trujillo's inner circle, a sycophant whose life was destroyed when he fell out of favour. Trujillo is surrounded by sycophants, because Trujillo rewards his friends and kills anyone who criticises him.

This is a real page turner. I wanted to know Urania's story: why does she hate her father, and why has she never returned to Dominica? Will the conspiracy to assassinate Trujillo succeed? Will the conspirators survive? Will Trujillo's insane brothers and son destroy the country? ( )
  pamelad | Jun 19, 2020 |
Great historical fiction set in the violent reign of Trujillo. Alternating chapters tell the story of a woman returning to her home in the Dominican Republic to see her dying father whom she hates. The reader is not sure why she hates her father so much until the ending of the book, but she has valid reason.

The other chapters tell of the conspirators who assassinate Trujillo and the consequences for each of them. Some are honored, some are killed, some lose their will, and others disappear.

There is much history here accurately told. The character of Trujillo is chilling; he was man who did bring prosperity to the nation, but demanded the absolute loyalty from those around him. Those around him were tested constantly to prove their loyalty. The family of Trujillo is spoiled, violent, and equally as demanding.

The story caused me to research many of the characters portrayed and the information about them is almost stranger than fiction could be. The writing to this is engaging and it is a great example of the best of historical fiction.
The Latin names are often confusing; however, as they are not always referred to by the same name--sometimes a title, sometimes a nickname, etc. However, a great read. ( )
  maryreinert | Aug 9, 2018 |
Libro #42 de la lista de los 100 libros de Pasión por la lectura.
http://www.pasionporlalectura.itesm.mx/que_leo/cultura_general.htm
  celia.castro | Oct 4, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 55 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Vargas Llosa, Marioprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bensoussan, AlbertTraductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Felici, GlaucoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Grossman, EdithTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Landelius, PeterTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rycerz, DanutaTł.secondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schmidt, Rigmor KappelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tomcsányi, ZsuzsannaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
van der Wal, ArieTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wehr, ElkeTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zavadil, PetrTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Синянская, ЛюдмилаTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
El pueblo celebra con gran entusiasmo la Fiesta del Chivo el treinta de mayo.
Mataron al Chivo
Merengue Dominicano
Dedication
A Lourdes y José Israel Cuello, y a tantos amigos dominicanos
First words
Urania. Her parents had done her no favor; her name suggested a planet, a mineral, anything but the slender, fine-featured woman with burnished skin and large, dark, rather sad eyes who looked back at her from the mirror.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Original language
Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Publisher description: It is 1961. The Dominican Republic languishes under economic sanctions the Catholic church spurs its clergy against the government from its highest ranks down, the country is arrested in bone-chilling fear. In The Feast of the Goat, Vargas Llosa unflinchingly tells the story of a regime's final days and the unsteady efforts of the men who would replace it. His narrative skates between the rituals of the hated dictator, Rafael Trujillo, in his daily routine, and the laying-in-wait of the assassins who will kill him their initial triumph and the shock of fear's release--and replacements. In the novel's final chapters we learn Urania Cabral's story, self-imposed exile whose father was Trujillo's cowardly Secretary of State. Drawn back to the country of her birth from 30 years after Trujillo's assassination, the widening scope of the dictator's cruelty finds expression in her story, and a rapt audience in her extended family. In The Feast of the Goat, Vargas Llosa weighs the burden of a corrupt and corruptive regime upon the people who live beneath it. This is a moving portrait of an unrepentant dictator and the unwilling citizens drawn into his orbit.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.12)
0.5 1
1 7
1.5
2 15
2.5 5
3 65
3.5 35
4 208
4.5 42
5 191

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 162,156,385 books! | Top bar: Always visible