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Far from the Madding Crowd (1874)

by Thomas Hardy

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
9,539169574 (3.96)590
'I shall do one thing in this life - one thing for certain - that is, love you, and long for you, and keep wanting you till I die.'Gabriel Oak is only one of three suitors for the hand of the beautiful and spirited Bathsheba Everdene. He must compete with the dashing young soldier Sergeant Troy and respectable, middle-aged Farmer Boldwood. And while their fates depend upon the choice Bathsheba makes, she discovers theterrible consequences of an inconstant heart.Far from the Madding Crowd was the first of Hardy's novels to give the name of Wessex to the landscape of south-west England, and the first to gain him widespread popularity as a novelist. Set against the backdrop of the unchanging natural cycle of the year, the story both upholds and questionsrural values with a startlingly modern sensibility. This new edition retains the critical text that restores previously deleted and revised passages.… (more)
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    Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert (Booksloth)
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    Middlemarch by George Eliot (BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: These 19th-century classics portray complex romantic relationships with vivid descriptions and a strong sense of place. With intricate, twisting plots, both offer their protagonists bleak outlooks that end in satisfying resolutions.
  3. 40
    The Return of the Native by Thomas Hardy (Porua)
    Porua: I would like to recommend another Thomas Hardy novel, The Return of the Native. When I first read The Return of the Native it kind of surprised me to see how very similar it is to Far from the Madding Crowd. They are very similar in their story lines, characterization and narrative style.… (more)
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    Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell (Lapsus_Linguae)
    Lapsus_Linguae: Both main heroines are strong-willed independent women who take up entrepreneurship.
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    The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Brontë (Lapsus_Linguae)
    Lapsus_Linguae: Both novels feature a strong female protagonist trapped in an abusive marriage. Endings are also pretty similar.
  6. 22
    Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy (Booksloth)
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    York Notes: Far from the Madding Crowd by Barbara Murray (Sylak)
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» See also 590 mentions

English (165)  Dutch (2)  French (1)  Swedish (1)  All languages (169)
Showing 1-5 of 165 (next | show all)
I read the paperback edition of the Barnes & Noble Classics edition of this first of Thomas Hardy's great novels. Published in 1874 and set in the fictional Wessex counties of southwestern England in the 1860s, is the excellent story of simple farmers, a dashing soldier, a beautiful, rural heiress, love, obsession, betrayal and murder. ( )
  Jimbookbuff1963 | Jun 5, 2021 |
Turns out it's actually about ethics in gaming journalism. (Sorry) Seldom boring - Hardy takes advantage of the serial approach to springboard each chapter from a variety of angles that include a naturalist passage from the perspective of cemetery gargoyles and range from digressions on the sheep-shearing process to rural farce. The freedom of tone also proves distracting and crippling for the drama: Boldwood is a confounding character, at times seemingly conceived as a parody of Byronic heroes but also an object of sincere pity for both Oak and Bathsheba. Hard to sympathize when most of his conversations appear to have been ported in from a more overtly comic work. Of course, the obvious counterpoint is that Hardy's skill for climaxes is in evidence here, pulling these disparate tones together into something pretty lurid that gives the impression that the entire work coheres better than it does. But, I can imagine myself impatiently awaiting the next installment of this month-to-month in 1874, and that's not nothing. ( )
  brendanowicz | May 9, 2021 |
One of the most quotable books I’ve read and so clever. This took me a long time to read as there were some slower parts, and there was a lot of sheep description which I don’t know how to feel about. Overall, loved it! ( )
  Lindsayshodgson | May 6, 2021 |
This book was a pleasant one to listen to. What made it so pleasant that I kept listening, I'm not very sure.
I let the book go through my mind, but really can't put my finger on in. It was predictable, Bethseba wasn't a character that I gave much in common with, Troy I disliked wholeheartedly and Oak, well, need I try to put it into words?
And despite all of this I kept listening and I grew interest to find out if I would be right about the outcome. It turned out I was.
Another one ticked off the list, I'm happy it was a nice one! ( )
  BoekenTrol71 | Apr 4, 2021 |
Enjoyed a classic

I read this to participate in a local library's book discussion and I'm glad I did. Although I struggled through some of the early chapters, this story of a woman who was independent in an era when it wasn't acceptable or understood will stick with me for a long time. There's a reason why a classic is timeless--this one shows raw human emotions from so many angles. ( )
  LindaLoretz | Mar 15, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 165 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (53 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Thomas Hardyprimary authorall editionscalculated
Allingham, HelenIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dickerson, GeorgeIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Drabble, MargaretIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lee, JohnNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mathias, RobertCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
O'Toole, TessNotessecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Smith, Nicholas GuyNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vance, NormanIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
From wikipedia 19 Dec 2011 - Hardy took the title from Thomas Gray's poem 'Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard' (1751):
Far from the madding crowd's ignoble strife
Their sober wishes never learn'd to stray;
Along the cool sequester'd vale of life
They kept the noiseless tenor of their way.
Dedication
First words
When Farmer Oak smiled, the corners of his mouth spread till they were within an unimportant distance of his ears, his eyes were reduced to chinks, and diverging wrinkles appeared round them, extending upon his countenance like the rays in a rudimentary sketch of the rising sun.
On 30 November 1872 a letter arrived at Thomas Hardy's isolated cottage in Dorset that must by any standards be considered astonishing. (Introduction)
Quotations
It appears that ordinary men take wives because possession is not possible without marriage, and that ordinary women accept husbands because marriage is not possible without possession; with totally differing aims the method is the same on both sides.
It is difficult for a woman to define her feelings in language which is chiefly made by men to express theirs.
Bathsheba loved Troy in the way that only self-reliant women love when they abandon their self-reliance. When a strong woman recklessly throws away her strength she is worse than a weak woman who has never any strength to throw away. One source of her inadequacy is the novelty of the occasion. She has never had practice in making the best of such a condition. Weakness is doubly weak by being new.
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'I shall do one thing in this life - one thing for certain - that is, love you, and long for you, and keep wanting you till I die.'Gabriel Oak is only one of three suitors for the hand of the beautiful and spirited Bathsheba Everdene. He must compete with the dashing young soldier Sergeant Troy and respectable, middle-aged Farmer Boldwood. And while their fates depend upon the choice Bathsheba makes, she discovers theterrible consequences of an inconstant heart.Far from the Madding Crowd was the first of Hardy's novels to give the name of Wessex to the landscape of south-west England, and the first to gain him widespread popularity as a novelist. Set against the backdrop of the unchanging natural cycle of the year, the story both upholds and questionsrural values with a startlingly modern sensibility. This new edition retains the critical text that restores previously deleted and revised passages.

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Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141439653, 0141198931

Tantor Media

An edition of this book was published by Tantor Media.

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