HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Nibelungenlied

by Anonymous

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
2,939324,788 (3.8)1 / 59
No poem in German literature is so well known and studied in Germany and Europe as the 800-year-old Das Nibelungenlied. In the English-speaking world, however, the poem has remained little known, languishing without an adequate translation. This wonderful new translation by eminent translator Burton Raffel brings the epic poem to life in English for the first time, rendering it in verse that does full justice to the original High Middle German. His translation underscores the formal aspects of the poem and preserves its haunting beauty. Often called the German lliad, Das Nibelungenlied is a heroic epic both national in character and sweeping in scope. The poem moves inexorably from romance through tragedy to holocaust. It portrays the existential struggles and downfall of an entire people, the Burgundians, in a military conflict with the Huns and their king. In his foreword to the book, Michael Dirda observes that the story "could be easily updated to describe the downfall of a Mafia crime family, something like The Godfather, with swords." The tremendous appeal of Das Nibelungenlied throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is reflected in such works as Richard Wagner's opera tetralogy Der Ring des Nibelungen, Fritz Lang's two-part film Die Nibelungen, and, more recently, J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings.… (more)
  1. 120
    The Poetic Edda by Anonymous (andejons)
    andejons: Much of the story of Nibelungenlied is also told in the poetic Edda, but in considerably shorter form but with some extra material. There are also many points that differ.
  2. 50
    The Saga of the Volsungs by Anonymous (inge87)
  3. 50
    The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún by J. R. R. Tolkien (ed.pendragon)
    ed.pendragon: The German High Medieval version of the tale that Tolkien renders into English.
  4. 20
    Beowulf by Beowulf Poet (MissBrangwen)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

» See also 59 mentions

English (22)  Spanish (3)  German (2)  Italian (1)  Finnish (1)  French (1)  Swedish (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (32)
Showing 1-5 of 22 (next | show all)
I enjoyed the late Cyril Edwards’ clear prose translation a lot. I know despite its title that this wasn’t Wagner’s principal source for The Ring, but fascinating to see how the narrative and characters here are represented in both narratives. Good introduction and notes. ( )
  djh_1962 | Jan 7, 2024 |
I film rendono i classici più belli, mentre rovinano i libri fantasy. ( )
  Sara_Lucario | Oct 19, 2021 |
The original hardly bares any comparison to the Wagner Ring Cycle; it still has its own rustic charm, if by charm you mean more death than a typical Shakespearean tragedy.

None of the characters are very honorable and most seem to be driven by a certain brazen vindictiveness; the few points where bloodshed could have been avoided are abandoned almost as if driven on by an inevitable fate of doom.

An interesting historical read, but not one that will be in my top ten Medieval literature list. ( )
  MusicforMovies | May 24, 2021 |
One of my very favorite Medieval works. Genius! ( )
  scottcholstad | Jan 31, 2020 |
Le emozioni ed i sentimenti pi profondi degli uomini, le loro passioni, non sono cambiate nel corso dei secoli.Una storia epica bellissima, con un finale coinvolgente ed eccezionale ( )
  AlessandraEtFabio | Dec 22, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 22 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (107 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Anonymousprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Armour, MargaretTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Boehn, Max vonsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dirda, MichaelForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Genzmer, FelixTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hatto, A. T.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Haymes, Edward R.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Härd, John EvertTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Horton, AliceTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Johnson, UweTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Krimpen, Jan vanBook Designer.secondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Legrand, EdyIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lorenzo Criado, EmilioTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lorenzo Criado, EmilioEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lyy, ToivoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mancinelli, LauraEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mínguez, José MiguelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mowatt, D. G.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pekonen, OsmoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Raffel, BurtonTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schoenberner, FranzIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schoenberner, FranzIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sievers, EduardEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Simrock, KarlTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sowinski, BernhardAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vredendaal, Jaap vanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
In old tales they tell us many wonders of heroes and of high courage, of glad feasting, of weeping and of mourning; and herein ye shall read of the marvellous deeds and of the strife of brave men. (Armour trans.)
We have been told in ancient tales many marvels of famous heroes, of mighty toil, joys, and high festivities, of weeping and wailing, and the fighting of bold warriors - of such things you can now hear wonders unending! (Hatto trans.)
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

No poem in German literature is so well known and studied in Germany and Europe as the 800-year-old Das Nibelungenlied. In the English-speaking world, however, the poem has remained little known, languishing without an adequate translation. This wonderful new translation by eminent translator Burton Raffel brings the epic poem to life in English for the first time, rendering it in verse that does full justice to the original High Middle German. His translation underscores the formal aspects of the poem and preserves its haunting beauty. Often called the German lliad, Das Nibelungenlied is a heroic epic both national in character and sweeping in scope. The poem moves inexorably from romance through tragedy to holocaust. It portrays the existential struggles and downfall of an entire people, the Burgundians, in a military conflict with the Huns and their king. In his foreword to the book, Michael Dirda observes that the story "could be easily updated to describe the downfall of a Mafia crime family, something like The Godfather, with swords." The tremendous appeal of Das Nibelungenlied throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is reflected in such works as Richard Wagner's opera tetralogy Der Ring des Nibelungen, Fritz Lang's two-part film Die Nibelungen, and, more recently, J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
No poem in German literature is so well known and studied in Germany and Europe as the 800-year-old Das Nibelungenlied. In the English-speaking world, however, the poem has remained little known, languishing without an adequate translation. This wonderful new translation by eminent translator Burton Raffel brings the epic poem to life in English for the first time, rendering it in verse that does full justice to the original High Middle German. His translation underscores the formal aspects of the poem and preserves its haunting beauty. Often called the German lliad, Das Nibelungenlied is a heroic epic both national in character and sweeping in scope. The poem moves inexorably from romance through tragedy to holocaust. It portrays the existential struggles and downfall of an entire people, the Burgundians, in a military conflict with the Huns and their king. In his foreword to the book, Michael Dirda observes that the story “could be easily updated to describe the downfall of a Mafia crime family, something like The Godfather, with swords.” The tremendous appeal of Das Nibelungenlied throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is reflected in such works as Richard Wagner’s opera tetralogy Der Ring des Nibelungen, Fritz Lang’s two-part film Die Nibelungen, and, more recently, J. R. R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings.  
(Yale University Press)
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

The Nibelungenlied - LIMITED EDITIONS CLUB 1960 in Fine Press Forum

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.8)
0.5
1 3
1.5
2 11
2.5 3
3 74
3.5 19
4 86
4.5 6
5 62

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 206,166,905 books! | Top bar: Always visible