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The Color Purple (1982)

by Alice Walker

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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16,823305231 (4.13)634
As a young, black woman living in 1930s Georgia, Celie faces constant violence and oppression. She survives the brutality of incest before being married off to "Mr.," who routinely abuses her both physically and emotionally. Eventually, Celie develops a deep bond with her husband's mistress Shug, and it is through this relationship that she understands she is a woman capable of being loved and respected.… (more)
1980s (19)
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» See also 634 mentions

English (294)  Italian (2)  Dutch (2)  Swedish (2)  Hungarian (1)  Vietnamese (1)  French (1)  Spanish (1)  German (1)  All languages (305)
Showing 1-5 of 294 (next | show all)
Such an amazing book with so many emotional turmoils churning just from letters! Now looking forward to watch the award winning movie though still unsure... worried the movie might not portray as much from the book.

Here's my full review:
http://www.sholee.net/2017/06/mpov-color-purple.html ( )
  Sholee | Sep 9, 2021 |
Amazing -- read the whole book in one night. Such interesting, strong female characters and intense but important reflections on race, class, gender, self-esteem and empowerment. ( )
  kendradey | Jul 10, 2021 |
A very uplifting book. This book, though spiritual, reads like a novel. It explores topics which range from survival to sexuality. This book is a must on any book lovers shelf!
( )
  Wexfordian | Jun 30, 2021 |
This is a spectacular book, isn't it? As a white Australian reading this in 2016, I am so far removed from the world of the novel for it to be an anthropological text. Walker's literary skills are superb, leading the reader on despite the often disheartening subject matter. And I can't even explain the thrill that ran up my spine reading sister Nettie's letters about her intellectual awakening in Africa. A classic. ( )
  therebelprince | Jun 24, 2021 |
Just a truly gorgeous book; Walker's character voices are so strong, and there's so much going on while also managing to be very accessible. I somehow hadn't read this until now, but if you, like me, just haven't gotten to it, I strongly recommend you pick it up, and I myself will probably end up rereading this at some point just because I think there's so much going on that I maybe glossed over or wasn't fully attuned to.

Just a beautiful book, and one I know I will return to at some point. ( )
  aijmiller | Apr 27, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 294 (next | show all)
Walker accomplishes a rare thing: She makes an epistolary novel work without veering into preciousness. Rather, Celie's full-bodied voice emerges, a moody and honest voice, in an inherently intimate literary form.
 
Without doubt, Alice Walker's latest novel is her most impressive. No mean accomplishment, since her previous books - which, in addition to several collections of poetry and two collections of short stories, include two novels ("The Third Life of Grange Copeland" and "Medridian") - have elicited almost unanimous praise for Miss Walker as a lavishly gifted writer
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Walker, Aliceprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Caramella, MarisaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dam, Irma vanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dezsényi, KatalinTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fuente, Ana María de laTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hallén, KerstinTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Juva, KerstiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lombardi Bom, AndreinaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mollokwu, PearlCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Perrin, MimiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pfetsch, HelgaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Reis, PaulaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rogde, IsakTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tóth, CsabaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Teare, BradIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Van Dam, IrmaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wiley, SamiraNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
"Show me how to do like you.
Show how to do it." -Stevie Wonder
Dedication
To the Spirit:
Without whose assistance
Neither this book
Nor I
Would have been
Written.
First words
You better not never tell nobody but God. It'd kill your mammy.
Quotations
Time moves slowly, but passes quickly.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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As a young, black woman living in 1930s Georgia, Celie faces constant violence and oppression. She survives the brutality of incest before being married off to "Mr.," who routinely abuses her both physically and emotionally. Eventually, Celie develops a deep bond with her husband's mistress Shug, and it is through this relationship that she understands she is a woman capable of being loved and respected.

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Book description
Tells the story of two African-American sisters: Nettie, a missionary in Africa, and Celie, a child-wife living in the south, in the medium of their letters to each other and in Celie's case, the desperate letters she begins, "Dear God."
Haiku summary
A woman's tale
on the politics of black
Georgia, 1930s, grit, faith
survival - told from the heart

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