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Les Liaisons Dangereuses by Pierre Choderlos…
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Les Liaisons Dangereuses (1782)

by Pierre Choderlos de Laclos

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
4,150541,206 (4.11)1 / 263
  1. 20
    Cousin Bette by Honoré de Balzac (kristelako)
  2. 10
    The Mandrake Root by Niccolò Machiavelli (timoroso)
  3. 00
    Love in Excess by Eliza Haywood (StevenTX)
  4. 00
    Quartett. by Heiner Müller (JuliaMaria)
    JuliaMaria: "Quartett": Ein Schauspiel nach Choderlos de Laclos' Gefährliche Liebschaften bearbeitet
  5. 11
    Viscount Valmont #1 by さいとう ちほ (octopedingenue)
    octopedingenue: manga adaptation of the book
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English (38)  French (9)  Dutch (3)  Portuguese (1)  German (1)  Italian (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (54)
Showing 1-5 of 38 (next | show all)
I really enjoyed the introduction to the book and background on its history and author. I give that 4 stars. The letters themselves/characters are kind of bland and boring as far as people go. I can't say I find it very clever or titillating. The only person of interest is the young Cécile de Volanges. I usually don't feel a need to skim her letters. ( )
  CassandraT | Oct 10, 2014 |
Very compelling. Can you trust either of these characters in their plot? Great read even though written in 1782. ( )
  JVioland | Jul 14, 2014 |
An absolutely magnificent novel! To think that it was published in 1782, seven years before the French Revolution. Liberté, égalité, fraternité! It has thus been argued that the novel caught a doomed aristocracy amidst decadent and libertine ways that would soon be its undoing. The gift the novel's main characters display for casuistry, calumny, prevarication and cynical self-involvement takes the breath away even now. I've read it twice then bought this gorgeous Folio Society edition to commemorate past readings and carry me through future ones. A stunning novel. A book for real readers. ( )
2 vote William345 | Jun 11, 2014 |
This book is written in the form of various letters between the main characters, mainly Valmont and Merteuil. They plot and scheme and seduce and gloat and are generally quite unpleasant. The web of intrigue and deceit gets ever more complicated. It's pretty dense flowery writing, so can't be consumed too quickly, but I was glad I persevered. ( )
1 vote AlisonSakai | Feb 24, 2014 |
An acquaintance dismissed this voluptuous tale, thus: "All they do is talk."
Let's begin there. The language is rich. I daresay that language becomes an erogenous zone in Les Liaisons Dangereuses.
If you aspire to a working understanding of good and evil, you could do worse than listen to the riveting chatter of the leading personae, who choose each word with careful, deliciously ribald, austerely cruel and domineering intent. You really don't want to be a friend, and you most assuredly don't want to be an enemy.
Men, en garde! The Marquise de Merteuil impulsively thinks of cojones as table ornaments.
Ladies, away! The Vicomte de Valmont is a pirate lover, he sees women as prize ships ready for boarding.
One might wish to believe that the others are innocents: Cecile Volanges, Danceny, the Presidente de Tourvel. But, hold. Each of them seeks to play the game of love, but they are hardly able to distinguish winning from losing.
Yes, this is a boundless expose of the worst elements of human intrigue, hubris, vaunting egos and careless poaching of souls that masquerades as amour.
Yes, in a sense, the characters are stereotypes, but each is, remarkably, ingeniously, ingenuously, a masterpiece of the type. Laclos uses every pertinent word to make them real….
Yes, Les Liaisons is an ultimately degraded experience for both the characters and readers….ultimately, the reader must condemn the Marquise and the Vicomte for so many lives destroyed….
Yet, a gentle reader may offer these two a bare shred of pity: the Marquise de Merteuil and the Vicomte de Valmont swirl through their lives, casually jousting with each other as they act to control the fates of other men and women, but remaining unaware that they are not in control of their own fates.

Read more on my blog: http://barleyliterate.blogspot.com/ ( )
4 vote rsubber | Dec 22, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 38 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (288 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Pierre Choderlos de Laclosprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Aldington, RichardTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Beretta Anguissola, AlbertoIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bigliosi Franck, CinziaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Coward, DavidIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Delon, MichelEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Malraux, AndréIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Morriën, AdriaanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Papadopoulos, JoëlNotessecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ruata, AdolfoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stone, P. W. K.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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J'ai vu les moeurs de mon temps, et j'ai publié ces Lettres - J.J. Rousseau, Preface to 'Héloïse'
Dedication
First words
Well, Sophie dear, as you see, I'm keeping my word and not spending all my time on bonnets and bows, I'll always have some to spare for you!
Quotations
I was amazed at the pleasure a good deed can produce and I'm tempted to think that those so-called virtuous people don't deserve quite as much credit as we are invited to believe.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Book description
Haiku summary
What can you do with
Fifteen dozen French letters?
Here are some ideas.
(thorold)

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0140441166, Paperback)

An epistolary novel chronicles the cruel seduction of a young girl by two ruthless, 18th-century aristocrats.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:04:52 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

Depicting decadence and moral corruption in pre-revolutionary France, Dangerous Liaisons is one of the most scandalous and controversial novels in European literature. Two aristocrats embark on a sophisticated game of seduction and manipulation to bring amusement to their jaded existences. While the Marquise de Merteuil challenges the Vicomte de Valmont to seduce an innocent convent girl, the Vicomte is also occupied with the conquest of a virtuous married woman.… (more)

» see all 6 descriptions

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Audible.com

5 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

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Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0140449574, 0141195142

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