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Dubliners by James Joyce
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Dubliners (1914)

by James Joyce

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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13,982156148 (3.92)1 / 390
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English (149)  Dutch (2)  Italian (2)  German (1)  Spanish (1)  All (155)
Showing 1-5 of 149 (next | show all)
Much has been said about his work, which is one of the problems with Joyce. We all know of him, but how many of us have read him? I read A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man many years ago, and remember almost nothing of it. And like many others before me I tried to tackle Ulysses and got about ten pages in and said, "Bugger this!" (Imagine me saying it in my poor approximation of an Irish accent, and you'll get the idea.) But it occurred to me that hearing the words spoken might be exactly the way I should approach Joyce this time, and if it worked, if I found myself enjoying one of the more accessible books, then perhaps the audio book of Ulysses or Finnegan's Wake would go on my list.

In the end I discovered that I liked Joyce. I'm not a huge fan, but I like the sound of his words, particularly when read by Irish actors. And in the Caedmon version, the quality of the narration is up and down, with possibly the best reading being done by Stephen Rea, who gives us a version of The Dead that sounds as if it comes from the depths of a weary soul. Props also to Ciaran Hinds, Colm Meany, and Dan O'Herlihy. Alas the one Irish actor I'd have loved to hear narrate one of these stories was not included. Donal McCann, who left us far too soon, would have done an outstanding job, but it was not to be.

As for the stories themselves, I began to see that they were all about who people think they are and why. They're brief glances into events, even moments of the characters' lives that are so telling, that make their identities so clear that you come away from each one understanding what they hope for, and why they are suffering.

One story in particular -- I don't recall the title at the moment, so apologies for being vague here -- is the best sketch of an alcoholic I have ever read. I listened, becoming increasingly impatient with him until I wanted to shove him down the stairs. And then I recognized the knowledge that he was fleeing from, and felt terribly sad. It didn't excuse him, but it did explain him.

I'm not sure if I will go any further with Joyce, even in audio form, but I did enjoy Dubliners tremendously, and that's all you can ask from a book.
  Tracy_Rowan | Aug 24, 2017 |
Realistic, yet depressing depictions of the everyday lives of various commonplace individuals --their thoughts, feelings, and experiences as their dramas played out. Well-written, but overwhelmingly sad. ( )
  Trisarey | Aug 7, 2017 |
Review pending. ( )
  kephradyx | Jun 20, 2017 |
At the end of my course on British literature 1890-1950, I polled my students on the best and worst of the readings they had done. I lost those notes, unfortunately, but I did write down one of them for posterity: "Dubliners cut across all the necessary themes literature may demand. It helped me understand life better." She's not wrong.

I first read "The Dead" as a high school senior, and liked it so much that it inspired me to pick up all of Dubliners in college, and of course I had to reread it to teach it. On each iteration, I like it more, and I understand it more. The whole book is excellent, but "The Dead" is a masterpiece, and you could probably argue that Joyce singlehandedly changed the direction of the short story in English. So much that's meaningful comes together in "The Dead": it's all about connection, imagining the other, projecting desire, recognizing the self, and experiencing epiphany. It's sort of uplifting and sad at the same time. Joyce captures humanity as it is in a way few others do. I look forward to reading Dubliners again and again. Hopefully it will allow me too to understand life better.
  Stevil2001 | Apr 21, 2017 |
Quite apart from the perfection of “The Dead,” death permeates the stories, vignettes, character sketches and emotional revues of Dubliners. A death is announced in the first sentence of the first story, “Sisters.” Whether in the foreground or mentioned in passing, deaths are just part of life for those who live in Dublin. When death gets title billing in that final story, it is hardly surprisingly to find Joyce reaching some kind of summative view on the matter with the snow now general across all of Ireland.

This time reading Dubliners, I was struck by the “The Sisters,” “An Encounter,” and, as ever, “Araby.” But also “The Boarding House,” and “A Mother.” Yet standing apart from all of them is “The Dead.” It is so much more complete, so much more complex, so much more human and humane, and sadder. It truly is the culmination.

Highly recommended, every time you read it. ( )
1 vote RandyMetcalfe | Mar 19, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 149 (next | show all)
Quite apart from the perfection of “The Dead,” death permeates the stories, vignettes, character sketches and emotional revues of Dubliners. A death is announced in the first sentence of the first story, “Sisters.” Whether in the foreground or mentioned in passing, deaths are just part of life for those who live in Dublin. When death gets title billing in that final story, it is hardly surprisingly to find Joyce reaching some kind of summative view on the matter with the snow now general across all of Ireland.

This time reading Dubliners, I was struck by the “The Sisters,” “An Encounter,” and, as ever, “Araby.” But also “The Boarding House,” and “A Mother.” Yet standing apart from all of them is “The Dead.” It is so much more complete, so much more complex, so much more human and humane, and sadder. It truly is the culmination.

Highly recommended, every time you read it.
 

» Add other authors (121 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
James Joyceprimary authorall editionscalculated
Brown, TerenceEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cabrera Infante, GuillermoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cancogni, FrancaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Clarke, J. J.Photographersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Colum, PadraicIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Davidson, FrederickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Doyle, GerardNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ellmann, RichardEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fleckhaus, WillyCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hynes, TadhgNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jacques, RobinIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McCallion, DavidNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McKenna, T. P.Narratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Norton, JimNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
O'Brien, GerryNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Scholes, Robert E.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zimmer, Dieter E.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Series (with order)
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People/Characters
Important places
Important events
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Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
The Sisters

There was no hope for him this time: it was the third stroke.
An encounter: It was Joe Dillon who introduced the Wild West to us.
Araby: North Richmond Street, being blind, was a quiet street except at the hour when the Christian Brothers' School set the boys free.
Eveline: She sat at the window watching the evening invade the avenue.
After the race: The cars came scudding in towards Dublin, running evenly like pellets in the groove of the Naas Road.
Quotations
Last words
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Disambiguation notice
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Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
This Signet Classic paperback was based on the 1968 revised edition of the 1958 Viking Compass edition of 'Dubliners' prepared by Robert Scholes and published by Penguin Books. By 2010, and with fairly good care, there should be only minor yellow to the edges. The cover holds up well. The print is easy to read, and any typographic errors are probably buried in Joyce's style.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0486268705, Paperback)

Declared by their author to be a chapter in the moral history of Ireland, this collection of 15 tales offers vivid, tightly focused observations of the lives of Dublin's poorer classes. A fine and accessible introduction to the work of one of the 20th century's most influential writers, it includes a masterpiece of the short-story genre, "The Dead."

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:20 -0400)

(see all 9 descriptions)

An unabridged republication of Joyce's early twentieth-century vignettes of Irish life.

» see all 24 descriptions

Legacy Library: James Joyce

James Joyce has a Legacy Library. Legacy libraries are the personal libraries of famous readers, entered by LibraryThing members from the Legacy Libraries group.

See James Joyce's legacy profile.

See James Joyce's author page.

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Penguin Australia

4 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141182458, 0140186476, 0241956854, 0141199628

Urban Romantics

2 editions of this book were published by Urban Romantics.

Editions: 1909175722, 1909175463

Tantor Media

An edition of this book was published by Tantor Media.

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HighBridge Audio

An edition of this book was published by HighBridge Audio.

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HighBridge

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