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The Decameron

by Giovanni Boccaccio

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
8,987113717 (4)1 / 269
The Decameron (c.1351) is an entertaining series of one hundred stories written in the wake of the Black Death. The stories are told in a country villa outside the city of Florence by ten young noble men and women who are seeking to escape the ravages of the plague. Boccaccio's skill as adramatist is masterfully displayed in these vivid portraits of people from all stations in life, with plots that revel in a bewildering variety of human reactions.… (more)
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» See also 269 mentions

English (77)  Dutch (8)  Spanish (4)  Catalan (4)  Italian (3)  German (2)  Portuguese (1)  Danish (1)  Swedish (1)  Hungarian (1)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  Finnish (1)  All languages (104)
Showing 1-5 of 77 (next | show all)
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magnifico! il terzo autore più grande nella trittica: Dante, Petrarca, Boccaccio...che dire è colui che ho evoluto le novelli, generato romanzi, analizzato e intuito i sucessivi 500/600 anni.
Geoffrey Chaucer ha copiato da boccaccio! altro che letteratura inglese!
Geoffrey Chaucer is a copy of the Great Boccaccio!
the England is china?
added by sshnn | editMilano, ss (Dec 2, 2012)
 

In many of the stories, and more strikingly in the poems/songs which conclude each day, a close reader can also detect an allegorical element in which the soul is depicted as a lost lover, seeking to return to paradise. Originally a concept from the mystery religions, this allegorical treatment became very popular in the Middle Ages, particularly as an important aspect of the courtly love tradition.
added by camillahoel | editRead And Find Out, Tom (Sep 11, 2009)
 

» Add other authors (122 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Boccaccio, Giovanniprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Aldington, RichardTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Alfano, GiancarloEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bakker, MargotTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bergin, Thomas G.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bondanella, Peter E.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bosschère, Jean deIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Branca, VittoreEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Buckland Wright, JohnIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cipolla, FrateCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Denissen, FransTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fanfani, PietroEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fiorilla, MaurizioEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hokkanen, VilhoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hutton, EdwardIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kelfkens, C. J.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kredel, FritzIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lahti, IlmariTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Macchi, RuthTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Macchi, V.Afterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Massó Torrents, JaumeEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McWilliam, G. H.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Musa, MarkTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mussafia, AdolfoContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Narro, JoséIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Payne, JohnTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Quondam, AmedeoEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Raleigh, Walter AlexanderIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rebhorn, Wayne A.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rigg, J. M.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rossi, AldoEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sandfort, J.A.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schlegel, August Wilhelm vonContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stipriaan, René vanAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vallverdú, FrancescTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Veglia, MarcoEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vosseler, MartinContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Winwar, FrancesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Witte, KarlContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Es beginnt das Buch Dekameron, auch Principe Galeotto genannt, mit seinen hundert Geschichten, die in zehn Tagen von sieben Damen und drei jungen Männern erzählt werden.
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A kindly thing it is to have compassion of the afflicted and albeit it well beseemeth every one, yet of those is it more particularly required who have erst had need of comfort and have found it in any, amongst whom, if ever any had need thereof or held it dear or took pleasure therein aforetimes, certes, I am one of these.
Gracious Ladies, so often as I consider with my selfe, and observe respectively, how naturally you are enclined to compassion; as many times doe I acknowledge, that this present worke of mine, will (in your judgement) appeare to have but a harsh and offensive beginning, in regard of the mournfull remembrance it beareth at the verie entrance of the last Pestilentiall mortality, universally hurtfull to all that beheld it, or otherwise came to knowledge of it. But for all that, I desire it may not be so dreadfull to you, to hinder your further proceeding in reading, as if none were to looke thereon, but with sighs and teares. For, I could rather wish, that so fearfulle a beginning, should seeme but as an high and steepy hil appeares to them, that attempt to travell farre on foote, and ascending the same with some difficulty, ome afterward to walk upo a goodly even plaine, which causeth the more cotentment in them, because the attayning thereto was hard and painfull. For even as pleasures are cut off by griefe and anguish; so sorrowes cease by joyes most sweete and happie arriving.
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The Decameron (c.1351) is an entertaining series of one hundred stories written in the wake of the Black Death. The stories are told in a country villa outside the city of Florence by ten young noble men and women who are seeking to escape the ravages of the plague. Boccaccio's skill as adramatist is masterfully displayed in these vivid portraits of people from all stations in life, with plots that revel in a bewildering variety of human reactions.

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A group of travelers entertain each other by telling tales and stories of naughtiness and debauchery, happy ending and ironic adventures.
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Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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