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The Postman

by David Brin

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
3,888872,635 (3.73)1 / 194
NOW A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE * "A moving experience . . . a powerful cautionary tale."--Whitley Strieber He was a survivor--a wanderer who traded tales for food and shelter in the dark and savage aftermath of a devastating war.   Fate touches him one chill winter's day when he borrows the jacket of a long-dead postal worker to protect himself from the cold. The old, worn uniform still has power as a symbol of hope, and with it he begins to weave his greatest tale, of a nation on the road to recovery. This is the story of a lie that became the most powerful kind of truth.  A timeless novel as urgently compelling as War Day or Alas, Babylon, David Brin's The Postman is the dramatically moving saga of a man who rekindled the spirit of America through the power of a dream, from a modern master of science fiction. "The Postman will keep you engrossed until you've finished the last page."--Chicago Tribune… (more)
  1. 80
    A Canticle for Leibowitz by Walter M. Miller Jr. (Karlstar)
    Karlstar: Not a similar plot, but a classic book about a post-apocalyptic civilization.
  2. 40
    Earth Abides by George R. Stewart (redroc)
  3. 20
    Riddley Walker by Russell Hoban (reading_fox)
    reading_fox: Although the language is very different the themes are similar
  4. 21
    Dies the Fire by S. M. Stirling (MikeBriggs)
  5. 00
    The Book of Koli by M. R. Carey (reading_fox)
    reading_fox: Both feature someone trying to unite dystopian scattered communities
  6. 00
    Alas, Babylon by Pat Frank (sturlington)
    sturlington: The Postman was influenced by Alas, Babylon.
  7. 00
    Lucifer's Hammer by Larry Niven (sturlington)
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» See also 194 mentions

English (83)  French (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (85)
Showing 1-5 of 83 (next | show all)
Summary: A reluctant hero holds the line for civilisation while the forces of chaos and anarchy try to claw him (and the rest of the world) down into the ash.

Things I liked:

* I liked how some chapters started with a letter written between various correspondents and how this was used as a device to show some of the bigger picture stuff going on in the world outside of the main man's POV.
* Sense of threat was pretty constant and I definitely got the sense that anyone or anything could go pretty wrong pretty quickly. That made the whole setting more real and hence a lot more engaging.
* The general feel of the book had a hopeful note(s) which I've discovered I quite like in amongst the more bleak versions of post-apocalyptic fiction e.g. 'The Road' (I actually only watched the movie but the example still stands with other movies like 'Dawn of the Dead'.

Things I thought could be improved:

* just an anecdotal memory but some of the dialogue (from memory particularly the dialogue with the Cyclops servants was quite cheesy and stilted I thought. The descriptive prose eg.

"Snow delicately cover the death-glazed eyes of started deer, filling the channels between its starkly outlined ribs"

was much stronger.


Highlight:

I think when he get's to cottage grove and people are starting to buy into his story is where I started to really buy into the book so I guess that's my highlight. ( )
  benkaboo | Aug 18, 2022 |
excellent book - felt Gordon's struggle - wonder if movie is any good? ( )
  lkubed | Aug 14, 2022 |
3 ( )
  Count_Myshkin | Aug 11, 2022 |
I liked the book overall, but was alternately engrossed and, not bored but something close to it, by the story. There were multiple stories in this novel...almost a series of shirt stories knitted together. Every time I thought “well, this is the ending”, another story would start. Again, liked it, but didn’t love it. ( )
  mikernc | Jul 29, 2022 |
I really enjoyed this book. It is the story of post WWIII and things are not as they are now. Mail is something that ends up bringing people together and hope for a better future. ( )
  KyleneJones | Apr 25, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 83 (next | show all)
The great virtue of "The Postman" by David Brin is that it takes nothing for granted...Mr. Brin offers no simplistic formulas; nothing comes easy for the postman or the people he tries to help... Still, I found myself wishing that the ''war for men's minds'' in this book had a convincing personal as well as a sociological dimension. I am afraid that it would take a more complex character than his likable but limited postman to do justice to the important issues Mr. Brin raises.
 

» Add other authors (11 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
David Brinprimary authorall editionscalculated
Hallman, TomCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Langowski, JürgenTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Palencar, John JudeCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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To Benjamin Franklin,
devious genius,
and to Lysistrata,
who tried
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In dust and blood - with the sharp tang of terror stark in his nostrils - a man's mind wil sometimes pull forth odd relevancies.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
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NOW A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE * "A moving experience . . . a powerful cautionary tale."--Whitley Strieber He was a survivor--a wanderer who traded tales for food and shelter in the dark and savage aftermath of a devastating war.   Fate touches him one chill winter's day when he borrows the jacket of a long-dead postal worker to protect himself from the cold. The old, worn uniform still has power as a symbol of hope, and with it he begins to weave his greatest tale, of a nation on the road to recovery. This is the story of a lie that became the most powerful kind of truth.  A timeless novel as urgently compelling as War Day or Alas, Babylon, David Brin's The Postman is the dramatically moving saga of a man who rekindled the spirit of America through the power of a dream, from a modern master of science fiction. "The Postman will keep you engrossed until you've finished the last page."--Chicago Tribune

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Average: (3.73)
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1 12
1.5 6
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3 229
3.5 76
4 408
4.5 31
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