HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

I, Robot (1950)

by Isaac Asimov

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Isaac Asimov's Robot Series (1), Foundation Expanded Universe (1.0)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
13,720253355 (3.98)365
The three laws of Robotics: 1) A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm 2) A robot must obey orders given to it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law. 3) A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law. With these three, simple directives, Isaac Asimov changed our perception of robots forever when he formulated the laws governing their behavior. In I, Robot, Asimov chronicles the development of the robot through a series of interlinked stories: from its primitive origins in the present to its ultimate perfection in the not-so-distant future--a future in which humanity itself may be rendered obsolete. Here are stories of robots gone mad, of mind-read robots, and robots with a sense of humor. Of robot politicians, and robots who secretly run the world--all told with the dramatic blend of science fact and science fiction that has become Asmiov's trademark.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 365 mentions

English (228)  Spanish (7)  Danish (3)  French (2)  Dutch (2)  Swedish (2)  German (1)  Italian (1)  Portuguese (1)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (249)
Showing 1-5 of 228 (next | show all)
Published in 1950 and set in the future, this book is a connected series of short stories that portray the history of robotics from around the 2000s to 2070s. In Asimov’s future world, robots have been designed with positronic brains, which are programmed to observe the “Three Laws of Robotics” (very simply stated – avoiding harm to humans, following orders, and avoiding harm to self). The framing device used to turn these short stories into a cohesive novel is an unnamed journalist who serves as narrator, interviewing Dr. Susan Calvin. The narrator plans to publish a feature story about Calvin upon her retirement.

It explores the interplay between humans and machines. The plot revolves around testing hypotheses related to the “three laws.” For example, would there ever be a situation where a robot could lie? In this vision of the future, robots become increasingly important to the running of the world in ways that will minimize harm to humans, which stands in sharp contrast to humankind’s history of warring against each other and causing great harm. I think this book does an excellent job of probing many ethical questions that arise regarding human-robot interactions.

I find it interesting that some culturally accepted norms of the time were outside of the potential for change, even for someone as forward-thinking as Asimov. The scenes are rampant with workplace smoking, large tomes of physical books, and paper/pencil calculations. On the other hand, in an era where there were few female scientists, Dr. Susan Calvin is an intellectually gifted strong woman, and for me, one of the highlights of the book.

There is a bit of repetition that speaks to these stories being written separately and then stitched together later, but overall, I found it a delightful anticipation of artificial intelligence and the related ethical issues. What is the proper relationship between human and machine? What a great question! I enjoyed it very much. ( )
  Castlelass | Oct 30, 2022 |
Sequência de contos imensamente influente, unificada na figura da especialista em psicologia robótica Susan Calvin, contendo as famosas 3 leis da robóticas. Com seu estilo simples e direto, Asimov explora de modo didático, em 9 histórias, possíveis problemas envolvendo robôs e ao final, máquinas super inteligentes, envolvendo as leis. Quando algo dá errado, pensamos sobre, fazemos hipóteses e somos obrigados a intervir. E depois do problema solucionado, explicamos o ocorrido.

O problema aqui é que exceto o último, nenhum conto me cativou. Soaram como datados e de formulação rápida e portanto, de interesse mais histórico e canônico do que qualquer outro. A caracterização da reação dos personagens homens à Calvin, sempre de desconfiança, por ela ser mulher, tampouco ajuda.

O conto que me cativou e merece uma avaliação melhor - The Evitable Conflict (o conflito evitável), tem ideias instigantes. As máquinas são construídas construindo máquinas cada vez mais capacitadas intelectualmente que constróem máquinas cada vez mais capacitadas, até a 10 geração, quando seus cálculos e indicações se tornam imperscrutáveis aos humanos e o controle intelectual da produtividade lhes é delegado. ( )
  henrique_iwao | Aug 30, 2022 |
This book feels disjointed rather than like a fluid storyline. It became more cohesive as it went on, but it overall felt like fragments hastily stuck together. Some characters were likeable, and I'd rather have gotten a whole book based on them than this collection of short stories. I think it might have been better if it had just been left as a collection, without trying to tie the stories all together, but just skipping from one story to the next.
Anyway, this is one you could skip in the Robot series, and just start with Caves of Steel. ( )
  jessoftheBooks | Aug 23, 2022 |
I love it when a "classic" lives up that designation.

This book follows the imaginary, future evolution of robots across time. Starting with simple, non-speaking domestic helpers all the way to sophisticated machines that run the world.

A series of short stories as remembered by robopsycologist Susan Calvin near the end of her life.

Originally published in 1950, I can see how so much later science fiction has been based on this and other Asimov books. ( )
  sriddell | Aug 6, 2022 |
Hilarious, thought-provoking, a little terrifying. Loved it. Makes you think about the way humans think by looking at how robots could think. ( )
  Lunarsong | Jul 3, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 228 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (25 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Isaac Asimovprimary authorall editionscalculated
Černý, OldřichTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Östlund, HarryTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Berkey, JohnCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brick, ScottNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cartier, EddCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Efremov, Ivan AntonovičForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Elmgren, SvenTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fickling, DavidAdaptationsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Giphart, RonaldAuthorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schrag, OttoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Serra, LauraTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vámosi, PálTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wells, AlexIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wilson, Daniel H.Prefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Youll, StephenCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Is contained in

Contains

Is retold in

Has the adaptation

Is replied to in

Inspired

Has as a student's study guide

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To John W. Campbell, Jr., who godfathered the robots
First words
"Ninety-eight — ninety-nine — one hundred." Gloria with drew her chubby little forearm from before her eyes and stood for a moment, wrinkling her nose and blinking in the sunlight.
Quotations
The Three Laws of Robotics
1. A robot may not injure a human being, or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
2. A robot must obey the orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (3)

The three laws of Robotics: 1) A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm 2) A robot must obey orders given to it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law. 3) A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law. With these three, simple directives, Isaac Asimov changed our perception of robots forever when he formulated the laws governing their behavior. In I, Robot, Asimov chronicles the development of the robot through a series of interlinked stories: from its primitive origins in the present to its ultimate perfection in the not-so-distant future--a future in which humanity itself may be rendered obsolete. Here are stories of robots gone mad, of mind-read robots, and robots with a sense of humor. Of robot politicians, and robots who secretly run the world--all told with the dramatic blend of science fact and science fiction that has become Asmiov's trademark.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
A collection of loosely-connected short stories about a future in which semi-sentient robots and humans co-exist, bound together by Asimov's "Three Laws of Robotics."
Haiku summary
Robots must obey
Except when they don't have to
Which seems is always.
(johnxlibris)

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.98)
0.5 1
1 20
1.5 8
2 139
2.5 22
3 717
3.5 165
4 1510
4.5 117
5 1063

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 180,067,939 books! | Top bar: Always visible