HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic--and How It… (2006)

by Steven Johnson

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
3,6761652,514 (3.95)2 / 292
"An account of the worst cholera outbreak in Victorian London--and an exploration of how Dr. John Snow's solution revolutionized the way we think about disease in cities. In the summer of 1854, a devastating cholera outbreak seized London just as it was emerging as a modern city: more than 2 million people packed into a ten-mile circumference, a hub of travel and commerce, continually pushing the limits of infrastructure that's outdated as soon as it's updated. Author Johnson chronicles Snow's day-by-day efforts as he risked his own life to prove how the epidemic was being spread. When he created the map that traced the pattern of outbreak back to its source, Dr. Snow didn't just solve a pressing medical riddle--he established a precedent for the way modern city-dwellers, city planners, physicians, and public officials think about the spread of disease and the development of the modern urban environment.--From publisher description."--From source other than the Library of Congress… (more)
  1. 40
    The Great Mortality: An Intimate History of the Black Death, the Most Devastating Plague of All Time by John Kelly (meggyweg)
  2. 20
    The Medical Detective: John Snow, Cholera and the Mystery of the Broad Street Pump by Sandra Hempel (Ape)
  3. 20
    The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History by John M. Barry (John_Vaughan)
  4. 10
    And the Band Played On: Politics, People, and the AIDS Epidemic by Randy Shilts (Sandydog1)
    Sandydog1: A much, much, more recent (and equally gross) epidemiological thriller/mystery.
  5. 10
    On the Map: why the World Looks the Way it Does by Simon Garfield (John_Vaughan)
  6. 10
    Dr. Mutter's Marvels: A True Tale of Intrigue and Innovation at the Dawn of Modern Medicine by Cristin O'Keefe Aptowicz (Luchtpint)
  7. 10
    Green Metropolis: Why Living Smaller, Living Closer, and Driving Less are the Keys to Sustainability by David Owen (Othemts)
  8. 10
    The Death and Life of Great American Cities by Jane Jacobs (Othemts)
  9. 10
    One Hot Summer: Dickens, Darwin, Disraeli, and the Great Stink of 1858 by Rosemary Ashton (Othemts)
  10. 00
    The Medical Detectives, Volume 1 by Berton Roueché (Jerry.Yoakum)
  11. 11
    Rabid: A Cultural History of the World's Most Diabolical Virus by Bill Wasik (Anonymous user)
  12. 11
    Disease Maps: Epidemics on the Ground by Tom Koch (JBDTest2)
    JBDTest2: Testing a bug (but these two do seem like they'd go well together)
  13. 00
    Craze: Gin and Debauchery in an Age of Reason by Jessica Warner (wandering_star)
  14. 00
    The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot (VenusofUrbino)
  15. 00
    The American Plague: The Untold Story of Yellow Fever, The Epidemic That Shaped Our History by Molly Caldwell Crosby (John_Vaughan)
    John_Vaughan: A story of courage as much as plague
  16. 00
    Pox Americana: The Great Smallpox Epidemic of 1775-82 by Elizabeth A. Fenn (questionablepotato)
  17. 01
    Death in Hamburg: Society and Politics in the Cholera Years, 1830-1910 by Richard J. Evans (Rosentredere)
  18. 04
    London Mini Street Atlas by Geographers' A-Z Map Company (John_Vaughan)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

English (159)  Spanish (2)  Dutch (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (163)
Showing 1-5 of 159 (next | show all)
I started reading this book, then remembered that I had it on audio, so I finished with that.

I loved this book! It was a cross between eeeewww-inducing and fascinating. It also made me very, very grateful for the sanitation we have in the developed world. I appreciated the portion at the end of the book that talked about modern epidemics, the potential for modern epidemics, and how we can handle things to hopefully avoid them.

I wouldn't recommend this is you're at all squeamish about reading about bodily functions. ( )
  ssperson | Apr 3, 2021 |
While decent enough, I was generally disappointed in The Ghost Map. The story is certainly compelling and Dr. John Snow's pursuit of the early science of geoinformatics in pursuit of defeating cholera is a great story. But Johnson fails to wrap up the tale in a satisfying way, letting the final third of the book drag on indefinitely. ( )
1 vote jugglebird | Feb 18, 2021 |
A manual on taking down received wisdom and the confederacy of dunces that toot and holler behind it. The descriptions of the Miasmists struggling to maintain their world-view, the air was so foul it polluted the water, are sadly too familiar today. John Snow appears to be a saint of hard scrabble science. ( )
  skroah | Dec 14, 2020 |
An interesting view of one of London's widest plagues. A little slow at times, but overall a good overview, and a unique understanding of how our cities have been changed by indoor plumbing. ( )
  GretchenCollins | Dec 10, 2020 |
The story of the cholera outbreak in London that, in memory, began the science of epidemiology and dealt a death blow to the theory of disease-causing “miasma.” Johnson suggests it was much more complicated than that, with “experts” and laypeople fighting and door-to-door data collection carried on in significant part by one amateur vital to the conclusion that cholera was spread by infection-carrying water. This was necessary because figuring out where people got their water in pre-city planning London was quite complicated. ( )
1 vote rivkat | Dec 7, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 159 (next | show all)
To nonfiction book writers: if you want your book to sell, make huge, dramatic claims with your title and/or subtitle. If you want your book to be a bestseller, you actually have to fulfill those claims. Steven Johnson has done both, again and again.
 

» Add other authors (2 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Steven Johnsonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Gibson, BenjaminCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sklar, AlanNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
"A Klee painting named 'Angelus Novus' shows an angel looking as though he is about to move away from something he is fixedly contemplating. His eyes are staring, his mouth is open, his wings are spread. This is how one pictures the angel of history. His face is turned toward the past. Where we perceive a chain of events, he sees one single catastrophe which keeps piling wreckage and hurls it in front of his feet. The angel would like to stay, awaken the dead, and make whole what has been smashed. But a storm is blowing in from Paradise; it has got caught in his wings with such a violence that the angel can no longer close them. The storm irresistably propels him into the future to which his back is turned, while the pile of debris before him grows skyward. This storm is what we call progress."
—Walter Benjamin, "Theses on the Philosophy of History"
Dedication
For the women in my life:

My mother and sisters, for their amazing work
on the front lines of public health

Alexa, for the gift of Henry Whitehead

and Mame, for introducing me to London so many years ago . . .
First words
It is August 1854, and London is a city of scavengers.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
"An account of the worst cholera outbreak in Victorian London--and an exploration of how Dr. John Snow's solution revolutionized the way we think about disease in cities. In the summer of 1854, a devastating cholera outbreak seized London just as it was emerging as a modern city: more than 2 million people packed into a ten-mile circumference, a hub of travel and commerce, continually pushing the limits of infrastructure that's outdated as soon as it's updated. Author Johnson chronicles Snow's day-by-day efforts as he risked his own life to prove how the epidemic was being spread. When he created the map that traced the pattern of outbreak back to its source, Dr. Snow didn't just solve a pressing medical riddle--he established a precedent for the way modern city-dwellers, city planners, physicians, and public officials think about the spread of disease and the development of the modern urban environment.--From publisher description."--From source other than the Library of Congress

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.95)
0.5
1 2
1.5 2
2 27
2.5 11
3 148
3.5 73
4 396
4.5 47
5 201

Tantor Media

An edition of this book was published by Tantor Media.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 157,979,768 books! | Top bar: Always visible