HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Lord Jim (1900)

by Joseph Conrad

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
8,135101844 (3.69)305
This immortal novel of the sea tells the story of a British sailor haunted by a single youthful act of cowardly betrayal. To the white men in Bombay, Calcutta, and Rangoon, Jim is a man of mystery. To the primitive natives deep in the Malayan jungle, he is a god gifted with supernatural powers. To the beautiful half-caste girl who flees to his hut for protection, he is a lord to be feared and loved. Lord Jim-- Conrad' s classic portrait of a man' s guilt, his search for forgiveness, and his final, tragic redemption-- is a work of enduring value and one of the world' s great masterpieces.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 305 mentions

English (91)  Spanish (3)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  Dutch (1)  Portuguese (1)  Italian (1)  Czech (1)  Danish (1)  Piratical (1)  All languages (101)
Showing 1-5 of 91 (next | show all)
Fiction
  hpryor | Aug 8, 2021 |
If you’ve heard that Joseph Conrad wrote sea tales and come to Lord Jim expecting a Hornblower tale, you’ll be disappointed. Conrad’s first-hand experience of the sea in its many moods is evident. But the sea is merely the canvas; Conrad’s real subject is the depths of the heart, the vagaries of the human psyche. In this, Conrad’s books are similar to those of a contemporary novelist, Henry James.
The title character of the book appears and disappears, yet is the center of the book. Most of what we learn about Jim is third hand, as is much of the action of the plot. Almost all of the book, from chapter 5 to chapter 35, is told by a seaman only identified as Marlow, who also narrates Heart of Darkness. It’s an interesting narration technique: between us, the readers, and the protagonist stands the author, the nameless narrator who recounts what he heard from Marlow, who for his part, fills in what he heard directly from Jim with the accounts of other memorable characters such as Stein and Gentleman Brown. This distances us from the action. Marlow’s comment about Jim in chapter 21, “It is only through me that he exists for you,” is a reminder from Conrad of what is true about all fiction.
From childhood, Jim dreamed of performing heroic deeds. Stein, one of the many memorable secondary characters, diagnoses him, without ever meeting him, as a romantic. Yet when Jim twice finds himself in a situation calling for action—not even something heroic, but no more than would be expected of any seaman—he freezes. An understandable lapse, except that Jim cannot forgive himself, especially after the second incident, which leaves him stripped of his seaman’s papers. Jim can’t live with the discrepancy between his imagined ideal of himself and the reality of his failure, so he tries to disappear—running not so much from others as from himself.
Marlow slips into acting as his patron, arranging a series of positions for him, from which Jim flees every time his identity is revealed. Finally, Jim achieves some measure of peace in the remote trading station of Patusan, sent to be the agent of Stein. It isn’t long before he lives up to his image of himself, becoming the Tuan, the lord of the local population, and finding love with a woman he calls Jewel, stepdaughter of the corrupt agent he displaces. The idyll can’t last, of course. The last few chapters of this book, once a malevolent agent of destiny enters, were nearly unbearable to read. It seems as if Jim can only be destroyed by his evil twin, another product of Britain’s “us,” that is, the “right people.” Yet, like Jim, Gentleman Brown has been deformed by his experience of the South Seas. Whereas for Jim, the deformity takes the form of a naive devotion to honor, Brown has lost all sense of it.
All in all, this book is a well-told tale, written in rich late-nineteenth-century prose. Conrad, like Henry James, can strike the modern reader as long-winded. He often takes three sentences to say what writers today might say in one. This doesn’t strike me as padding, however. Instead, the expansiveness serves a purpose. It’s not for speed-reading but savoring. ( )
  HenrySt123 | Jul 19, 2021 |
A book for everyone to read. The story is an exploration of the expression of ego in a man of action. Or it is about redemption after the awakening to sin and human weakness. At any rate it is a character study viewed through the lens of a flawed narrator, fascinating, and due to be recalled continuously after the work has been read. Jim does wrong, but after being brought to understand that, how does he choose to live? There is an exotic milieu and colourful challenges, and Conrad's marvelous prose to enjoy. The book began to influence the world in 1900. ( )
  DinadansFriend | Jun 29, 2021 |
A young man with exalted fantasies of himself cannot recover his self-esteem after one act of cowardice. The result is the loss of his best friend, the deaths of people who have trusted him, heartbreak of the woman who loved him and his own death.
  ritaer | May 3, 2021 |
A thrilling & interesting story of an honorable but unfortunate seaman. Utilizes a surprising meta device to frame the story - the whole book is being told by a sailor at a bar.

The writing was beautiful but I found it to be overly ornate & overwrought at points. Was really a slog to get through some sections. Ultimately worthwhile. Great & tragic ending! ( )
  boxofgeese | Feb 23, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 91 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (105 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Conrad, JosephAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Adams, J. DonaldIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Crossley, StevenNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hampson, RobertEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lorch, FritzTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mathias, RobertCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Monod, SylvèrePrefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Monsarrat, NicholasIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mursia, UgoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Prinzhofer, RenatoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Siciliano, EnzoForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stafford, EdForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ward, LyndIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Watts, CedricEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Is contained in

Has the adaptation

Has as a study

Has as a commentary on the text

Has as a student's study guide

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
"It is certain my Conviction gains infinitely, the moment another soul will believe in it."

-Novalis
Dedication
To Mr. and Mrs. G. F. W. Hope
With Grateful Affection
After Many Years
Of Friendship
First words
He was an inch, perhaps two, under six feet, powerfully built, and he advanced straight at you with a slight stoop of the shoulders, head forward, and a fixed from-under stare which made you think of a charging bull. His voice was deep, loud, and his manner displayed a kind of dogged self-assertion which had nothing aggressive in it. It seemed a necessity, and it was directed apparently as much at himself as at anybody else. He was spotlessly neat, apparelled in immaculate white from shoes to hat, and in the various Eastern ports where he got his living as ship-chandler’s water-clerk he was very popular.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

This immortal novel of the sea tells the story of a British sailor haunted by a single youthful act of cowardly betrayal. To the white men in Bombay, Calcutta, and Rangoon, Jim is a man of mystery. To the primitive natives deep in the Malayan jungle, he is a god gifted with supernatural powers. To the beautiful half-caste girl who flees to his hut for protection, he is a lord to be feared and loved. Lord Jim-- Conrad' s classic portrait of a man' s guilt, his search for forgiveness, and his final, tragic redemption-- is a work of enduring value and one of the world' s great masterpieces.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.69)
0.5 2
1 39
1.5 5
2 75
2.5 24
3 240
3.5 63
4 338
4.5 41
5 242

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141441615, 0141199059

Urban Romantics

2 editions of this book were published by Urban Romantics.

Editions: 1909438030, 1909438162

Tantor Media

An edition of this book was published by Tantor Media.

» Publisher information page

Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

» Publisher information page

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 169,990,684 books! | Top bar: Always visible