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A Passage to India (1924)

by E. M. Forster

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
11,327127488 (3.76)571
In this Readers' Guide, Betty Jay considers the establishment of Forster's reputation and the various attempts of critics to decipher the complex codes that are a feature of his novel. Successive chapters focus on debates around Forster's liberal-humanism, with essays from F. R. Leavis, Lionel Trilling and Malcolm Bradbury; on the indeterminacy and ambiguity of the text, with extracts from essays by Gillian Beer, Robert Barratt, Wendy Moffat and Jo-Ann Hoeppner Moran; and on the sexual politics of Forster's work, with writings from Elaine Showalter, Frances L. Restuccia and Eve Dawkins Poll. The Guide concludes with essays from Jeffrey Meyers and Jenny Sharpe, who read A Passage to India in terms of its engagement with British imperialism.… (more)
  1. 50
    Where Angels Fear to Tread by E. M. Forster (li33ieg)
    li33ieg: Same author, different setting, same core themes
  2. 50
    The Raj Quartet, Volume 1: The Jewel in the Crown; The Day of the Scorpion by Paul Scott (FemmeNoiresque)
    FemmeNoiresque: Scott's The Raj Quartet, and particularly the relationship between Daphne Manners and Hari Kumar in the first novel, The Jewel In The Crown, is a revisioning of the charge of rape made by Adela Quested to Dr Aziz. Race, class and empire are explored in the aftermath of this event, in WWII India.… (more)
  3. 40
    Maurice by E. M. Forster (li33ieg)
    li33ieg: The man is brilliant! One should read all of his books!
  4. 40
    The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver (lucyknows)
    lucyknows: You could use the theme of colonialism to pair The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver with Passage to India by E. M. Forster.
  5. 10
    Shantaram by Gregory David Roberts (Booksloth)
  6. 10
    Major Pettigrew's Last Stand by Helen Simonson (kiwiflowa)
  7. 21
    The Jewel in the Crown by Paul Scott (Cecrow)
    Cecrow: These two novels bear close relationship in setting and circumstance.
  8. 10
    Natural Opium: Some Travelers' Tales by Diane Johnson (Anonymous user)
  9. 00
    The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy (WildMaggie)
  10. 00
    Slowly Down the Ganges by Eric Newby (John_Vaughan)
  11. 00
    Staying On by Paul Scott (KayCliff)
  12. 00
    Hindoo Holiday: An Indian Journal by J. R. Ackerley (SomeGuyInVirginia)
  13. 34
    The Jewel in the Crown [1984 TV mini-series] by Christopher Morahan (li33ieg)
    li33ieg: Similar period and themes
1920s (2)
Asia (12)
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» See also 571 mentions

English (119)  Spanish (3)  Dutch (2)  Italian (1)  Hebrew (1)  French (1)  All languages (127)
Showing 1-5 of 119 (next | show all)
A clash of cultures between the English rulers of India and those Indians who live under English rule, before the war for independence. The clash of culture, religions Christian, Muslim, Hindu and Sikh also play a large part of this book. ( )
  foof2you | Jul 16, 2022 |
Much like Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, A Passage To India promises much but loses itself in a haze of antiquity.

Now of course Defoe and Forster are divided by a gap of at least two centuries. But the narrative vogue is still present in both-one defined by Victorian sensibilities.

Forster, with A Passage To India, imposes a long winded and rambling commentary on East vs. West and racial disparity. Cut a long story short, even Forster had more than one way to deliver his Utopian monologue sans what he serves up in India. I suppose that at the end of the day, A Passage To India retains some historic value. Any morality it could impart is nullified by its migraine inducing narrative. ( )
  Amarj33t_5ingh | Jul 8, 2022 |
8496075036
  archivomorero | Jun 27, 2022 |
Absolutely brilliant account of British colonialism in India. I read this in high school and wandered around in sepia toned, saffron scented day dreams for weeks afterwards. A must read for any serious historical reader. ( )
  Windyone1 | May 10, 2022 |
I enjoyed this novel. The author writes extremely well. This story is about how British settlers and Indians get along in the 1920s, when India was still a colony of Great Britain. In a nutshell: With the worst intentions, they are enemies; even with the best intentions, they can't be friends. (Okay there's also a plot progression that brings about this conclusion: Two English women newly arrived in India befriends an Indian; they visit a cave together, one of the English women had a hallucination and claimed the Indian violated her; the Indian was put on trial, with different British people taking different sides; it turns out the Indian was innocent, but through the trials and the repercussions of the trials, the Indian find he can never be friends with English people again, at least not until Indian is free. ) The author writes in detail about the different landscapes in India, and presented the religious beliefs in India (particularly Hinduism) in a mystic yet somehow convincing light. The British are portrayed as blatantly racist, but rational, calm, and law-abiding, whereas the Indians are irrational and passionate. Thus, while Anglo India does bring modernity and rationality into the governing of India, they do so through oppression. And while India yearns for self-government, their division and irrationality seems to prevent them from effectiveness. ( )
  CathyChou | Mar 11, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 119 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (42 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Forster, E. M.Authorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Burra, PeterIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Campbell, AliCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dastor, SamNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Davidson, FrederickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Diaz, DavidCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Magadini, ChristopherIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mishra, PankajIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Motti, AdrianaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pigott-Smith, TimReadersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sanders, Scott RussellAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Simpson, WilliamCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stallybrass, OliverEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wilby, JamesNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
Dedication
To Syed Ross Masood and to the seventeen years of our friendship
First words
Except for the Marabar caves--and they are twenty miles off--the city of Chrandrapore presents nothing extraordinary.
Towards the end of 1906 Theodore Morison, who until recently had been Principal of the Anglo-Oriental College at Aligarh and now lived ay Weybridge, Surrey, was looking for a tutor in Latin for his Indian ward Syed Ross Masood, a young Moslem of good, indeed distinguished, family who was destined for Oxford. (Editor's Introduction)
The India described in A Passage to India no longer exists either politically or socially. (Prefatory Note)
Perhaps it is chance, more than any peculiar devotion, that determines a man in his choice of medium, when he finds himself possessed by an obscure impulse towards creation. (Introduction)
Quotations
"We must exclude someone from our gathering, or we shall be left with nothing."
Last words
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Wikipedia in English (1)

In this Readers' Guide, Betty Jay considers the establishment of Forster's reputation and the various attempts of critics to decipher the complex codes that are a feature of his novel. Successive chapters focus on debates around Forster's liberal-humanism, with essays from F. R. Leavis, Lionel Trilling and Malcolm Bradbury; on the indeterminacy and ambiguity of the text, with extracts from essays by Gillian Beer, Robert Barratt, Wendy Moffat and Jo-Ann Hoeppner Moran; and on the sexual politics of Forster's work, with writings from Elaine Showalter, Frances L. Restuccia and Eve Dawkins Poll. The Guide concludes with essays from Jeffrey Meyers and Jenny Sharpe, who read A Passage to India in terms of its engagement with British imperialism.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
A mysterious incident at the Marabar caves, involving Adela Quested, newly arrived from England, and the presumed guilt of charming and mercurial Dr. Aziz, are at the centre of Forster's magnificent novel of India during the Raj. Topical now, as in 1924, in its evocation of the dangers and ambivalences inherent in colonialism, as Forster said, it is 'about something wider than politics, about the search of the human race for a more lasting home, about the universe as embodied in the Indian earth and the Indian sky, about the horror lurking in the Marabar caves...'
Jacques Marchais original library book
Haiku summary
Grottes de Marabar/Mrs Moore à la mosquée/et l'Inde des Anglais/(tiercelin)
British and native / In the dark of Marabar / Neighbours, yet distant

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Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 014144116X, 0143566385

 

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