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The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom
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The Kitchen House (2010)

by Kathleen Grissom

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,8551872,979 (3.96)156
  1. 50
    The Help by Kathryn Stockett (Blogletter)
    Blogletter: Zowel Het Keukenhuis door Kathleen Grissom als Een keukenmeidenroman door Kathryn Stocket gaan over slavernij in Amerika.
  2. 30
    Someone Knows My Name: A Novel by Lawrence Hill (Anonymous user, vancouverdeb)
    Anonymous user: Both The Kitchen House and the Book of Negroes are about Black Slavery in the South. They are different, but provide an eye opening look at Black Slavery.
  3. 10
    Oonagh by Mary Tilberg (Iudita)
    Iudita: Historical fiction about indentured servants.
  4. 21
    The Color Purple by Alice Walker (varwenea)
  5. 00
    The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead (shearon)
  6. 00
    Slaves in the Family by Edward Ball (dara85)
  7. 00
    Cane River by Lalita Tademy (dara85)
  8. 00
    Yellow Crocus by Laila Ibrahim (susiesharp)
    susiesharp: this is also a tale of the south and slavery but this one is not as depressing as The Kitchen House but has a similar feel.
  9. 01
    The Long Song by Andrea Levy (vancouverdeb)
    vancouverdeb: Similar themes: black slaves, a young woman who works within the "White Master's" Plantation house.Slavery,Freedom from slavery; both wonderfully written. Divided loyalities, a fiesty female slave.
  10. 01
    Year the Colored Sisters Came to Town by Jacqueline Guidry (varwenea)
  11. 01
    The Ways of White Folks: Stories by Langston Hughes (varwenea)
  12. 01
    Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe (varwenea)
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» See also 156 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 187 (next | show all)
Way way too depressing for me to enjoy.
I'm not a big fan of sad books. I understand the storyline itself means that there will be sadness involved but I thought there would be happiness too.
After about the fifth fatality in under 100 pages I called it a day.
It just isn't for me. I don't need everything to be light but if there's not some happiness involved in the story then it just won't be something that I enjoy.
I'd have to imagine there was a more even mixture of happy and sad as you get further into the book, I just didn't make it that far I think. ( )
  Mishale1 | Dec 29, 2018 |
Annoyingly dumb heroine makes the exact same mistakes as her predecessor.
  KaterinaBead | Nov 26, 2018 |
soap opera ( )
  hukkleberri | Nov 15, 2018 |
I enjoyed the characters in this book. I found myself feeling sorry for Lavinia from the beginning. She is an orphaned at a young age and is placed with a family as a servant girl. She doesn't learn the rules of society. Lavinia also makes you realize how children don't judge people by the way they look.

This story takes place during slavery and on a plantation. The way the women both black and white are treated made me appreciate all that we now have. I felt for the black women because they were abused, beaten and looked down upon by the white men. The white women looked at them as whores and their servants.

All the characters were so well developed and I felt for them. Belle who raised Lavinia as her own was one I felt such pain and sorrow for. I am glad our book club read this book this year. ( )
  crazy4reading | Nov 10, 2018 |
I loved this book! It was a fast, easy read! Very vivid details. An amazing story line, scary to think this is how people (slaves) were treated and there really was nothing they could do about it. I can’t wait to read the next one! ( )
  Chelz286 | Aug 26, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 187 (next | show all)
Though there are several compelling insights in The Kitchen House, it’s nevertheless a formulaic story. There are graphic shocks, but no surprises.
added by lkernagh | editQuill & Quire, Sara Forsyth (Mar 1, 2010)
 
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For my beloved parents, Ted and Catherine Doepker, and for my dear mentor, Eleanor Drewry Dolan
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There was a strong smell of smoke, and new fear fueled me.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Book description
After seven-year-old Lavinia is orphaned on the journey from Ireland to the United States, she begins work in the kitchen house of a tobacco plantation and bonds with the slaves who become her adopted family, but when Lavinia is accepted into the big house, her loyalties are challenged.
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"In 1790, Lavinia, a seven-year-old Irish orphan with no memory of her past, arrives on a tobacco plantation where she is put to work as an indentured servant with the kitchen house slaves. Though she becomes deeply bonded to her new family, Lavinia is also slowly accepted into the world of the big house, where the master is absent and the mistress battles opium addiction. As time passes she finds herself perilously straddling two very different worlds and when loyalties are brought into question, dangerous truths are laid bare and lives are at risk. "--Publisher's description.… (more)

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