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The Girl on the Train

by Paula Hawkins

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
17,8781120281 (3.63)527
Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She's even started to feel like she knows them. "Jess and Jason," she calls them. Their life -- as she sees it -- is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost. And then she sees something shocking. It's only a minute until the train moves on, but it's enough. Now everything's changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and becomes inextricably entwined in what happens next, as well as in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good?… (more)
  1. 191
    Before I Go to Sleep by S. J. Watson (fannyprice)
    fannyprice: Similarly unreliable, damaged women trying to reconstruct their lives.
  2. 172
    Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn (Anonymous user)
  3. 40
    The Woman in the Window by Daniel Mallory (TAir)
  4. 30
    Into the Darkest Corner by Elizabeth Haynes (melissarochelle)
  5. 30
    The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson (James_Mourgos)
    James_Mourgos: Great murder mystery suspense from this famous Swedish author.
  6. 20
    The Widow by Fiona Barton (vancouverdeb)
    vancouverdeb: psychological suspense,various points of view, both feature a woman as the main character.
  7. 10
    No Night is Too Long by Barbara Vine (vwinsloe)
  8. 00
    Losing You by Nicci French (BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: A beloved teenage daughter goes missing in Losing You, a stranger (of sorts) in The Girl on the Train. Despite this difference, these compelling psychological suspense novels, each set in England, offer a gripping, twisty story.
  9. 00
    In Fidelity by M. J. Rose (BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: In these fast-paced, compelling psychological suspense novels, love, obsession, infidelity, and violence are all closely linked. Both centering around one woman, In Fidelity has a larger cast of characters (a family), while The Girl on the Train suffers alone.… (more)
  10. 00
    The Missing World by Margot Livesey (vwinsloe)
  11. 00
    The Earthquake Bird by Susanna Jones (SonjaA)
  12. 00
    Lullaby by Leïla Slimani (MissBrangwen)
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» See also 527 mentions

English (1,072)  Dutch (15)  Spanish (12)  Italian (9)  French (4)  Catalan (4)  German (2)  Swedish (2)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  Danish (1)  Indonesian (1)  Finnish (1)  All languages (1,124)
Showing 1-5 of 1072 (next | show all)
Wow, was für ein Buch. Diese Wendung war nicht abzusehen.
Auch wenn es manchmal etwas langatmig wurde Rachel immer wieder über sich selbst jammern zu lesen, war es doch alles wichtig. Auch ihr Gejammer. ( )
  RoXXieSiXX | May 20, 2024 |
Disclaimer: I kept myself pretty much in the dark about this book before reading it, GONE GIRL comparisons notwithstanding. I didn't even know it was set in England. I thought the train in question ran from NY to Connecticut! So, the early pages required a bit of adjustment on my part, but before I knew it, I was at page 50, page 100, halfway, then 100 pages left. The narrators weren't immediately likable, but I think they were real with the kind of honesty that usually gets edited. I understand why people say they didn't connect with the narrator(s), but I did find the story to be compulsively readable, which is why I call it a five star read. And while I didn't so much enjoy the character of Rachel, I found that her growth propelled the story forward toward a satisfying ending.

( )
  DianeVallere | May 16, 2024 |
I really, really did not enjoy this book. I gave it a chance because someone told me that I was great but it did not work for me. ( )
  tootall77hc | May 9, 2024 |
Worth reading. Characters evolve, nothing is as it looks like, till near the very end. It would be worth a fourth star, if it were not for its slipping into common thriller somewhere near the end. ( )
  Elanna76 | May 2, 2024 |
Not done yet but i like the way the author uses alcoholism blackouts as the device for a murder mystery. Creative. Also the description of addiction is very realistic and believable. ( )
  RaynaPolsky | Apr 23, 2024 |
Showing 1-5 of 1072 (next | show all)
"...a building, inescapable tension that Hawkins handles superbly, nibbling away at Rachel’s memories until we, like our sardonic, bitterly honest narrator, aren’t really sure we want to know what happened at all."
added by fannyprice | editThe Guardian, Alison Flood (Jan 19, 2015)
 
“The Girl on the Train” has more fun with unreliable narration than any chiller since “Gone Girl,” the book still entrenched on best-seller lists two and a half years after publication because nothing better has come along. “The Girl on the Train” has “Gone Girl”-type fun with unreliable spouses, too. Its author, Paula Hawkins, isn’t as clever or swift as Gillian Flynn, the author of “Gone Girl,” but she’s no slouch when it comes to trickery or malice. So “The Girl on the Train” is liable to draw a large, bedazzled readership too
added by rybie2 | editNew York Times, Janet Maslin (Jan 4, 2015)
 
Readers sometimes conflate the “likability” of characters with a compulsion to care about their fate, but with a protagonist so determined to behave illogically, self-destructively and frankly narcissistically (someone even refers to her as “Nancy Drew”), it’s tough to root for Rachel. She’s like the clueless heroine of a slasher film who opts to enter the decrepit, boarded-up house where all her friends have been murdered because she hears a mysterious sound through an upstairs window
 

» Add other authors (25 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Hawkins, Paulaprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Brealey, LouiseNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Corbett, ClareNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Crescentini, CarolinaLettoresecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fisher, IndiaNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Göhler, ChristophÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lawrence, Vera Brodskysecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Manhood, SilasPhotographersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Porteri, BarbaraTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ward, ClaireCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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For Kate
First words
She's buried beneath a silver birch tree down towards the old train tracks.
Quotations
The holes in your life are permanent. You have to grow around them, like tree roots around concrete; you mould yourself through the gaps.
All those plans I had—photography courses and cookery classes—when it comes down to it, they feel a bit pointless, as if I'm playing at real life instead of actually living it. I can't do this, I can't just be a wife. I don't understand how anyone does it—there is literally nothing to do but wait. Wait for a man to come home and love you. Either that or look around for something to distract you.
...let's be honest: women are still only valued for two things—their looks, and their role as mothers.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Wikipedia in English (1)

Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She's even started to feel like she knows them. "Jess and Jason," she calls them. Their life -- as she sees it -- is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost. And then she sees something shocking. It's only a minute until the train moves on, but it's enough. Now everything's changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and becomes inextricably entwined in what happens next, as well as in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good?

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Book description
Haiku summary
Fall-down drunk rides trains.
Witnesses murder? Maybe.
Needs to sober up.
(pickupsticks)

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