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A Room of One's Own (1929)

by Virginia Woolf

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
10,841148508 (4.12)1 / 534
In A Room of One's Own, Virginia Woolf imagines that Shakespeare had a sister: a sister equal to Shakespeare in talent, equal in genius, but whose legacy is radically different.This imaginary woman never writes a word and dies by her own hand, her genius unexpressed. But if only she had found the means to create, urges Woolf, she would have reached the same heights as her immortal sibling. In this classic essay, Virginia Woolf takes on the establishment, using her gift of language to dissect the world around her and give a voice to those who have none. Her message is simple: A woman must have a fixed income and a room of her own in order to have the freedom to create. Annotated and with an introduction by Susan Gubar… (more)
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» See also 534 mentions

English (133)  Spanish (4)  Italian (2)  Swedish (2)  Catalan (2)  French (2)  Dutch (1)  Norwegian (1)  German (1)  All languages (148)
Showing 1-5 of 133 (next | show all)
"Vlastita soba" je esej objavljen 1929. nastao nakon šest najvećih djela Virginije Woolf do te godine.
Feministički esej, kako ga mnogi i danas smatraju što i ustinu jest, podijeljen je u 6 poglavlja no svaki od njih veže se jedan uz drugi i objašnjava napisano u prethodnome. Glavna tematika je uvid u književnost, poeziju i prozu, no Woolf čvrsto dominira feminističkim pristupom, cinično pa i ljutito. Osvrće se na djela nekoliko ženskih spisateljica, ponajviše na Jane Austen i sestre Charlotte, Emily i Anne Brontë s naglaskom na suosjećaj ali i kritiku, parafraziram; da je Jane Austen mogla bolje napisati "Ponos i predrasude" da svoje papire nije morala kriti od posjetitelja".
Kada je kritika u pitanju ovdje Virginia Woolf ne štedi muškarce nimalo (profesore, spisatelje, obične muževe) svojim terminima poput "ugly fat professor ... that faggot", ili "masculine orgy" kada doslovno ismijava pa i nasmijava. Spominju se Shakespeare, Tolstoy, Balzac, G. Elliot i mnogi drugi. Spominje i po prvi put izravno ljubav žene prema ženi, a kasnije su je prozvali za safizam, tojest žensku homoseksualnost.
U 6. poglavlju pri kraju Woolf daje vrlo jednostavnu poruku/savjet svim ženama ponajviše, ali i muškarcima, da pišu bez obzira što, bez prevelikog osvrta na realizam, na kritiku, ali - da pišu iz duše. ( )
  tonimeter | May 13, 2022 |
An abundance of cogent and decidedly superior reviews for this book compels me to talk about something other than the primary content—the style of writing non-fiction/lectures from authors proficient in fiction.
I tend to skip good* non-fiction mainly because of the narrative style alike a newspaper editorial stretched to 200 pages, which, at least for me, is a futile exercise in continuous reading.
Woolf, however wrote not only of the arguments she wanted to make but of the whole life-cycle of its development - from its trickling but diffused conception in the sanctimonious Oxbridge air; to a broad formulation over post-supper ruminations on the collective misfortunes of half the human race; to a quest made in vain to ply this amoeboid argument with flesh and blood at another library designed for men by men; to very thorough debates over whatever literature, defined in flexible terms, could be salvaged as milestones; and then some more.
This amazing journey of a thought's birth on paper could only be accomplished this well by an author with a command on not just academic writing, but also fictional narratives.

*I loosely define good nonfiction as a coherent, intelligent, opinionated, source supplemented text. ( )
  Toshi_P | May 6, 2022 |
She makes the point that in order for a human being to engage in intellectual, creative work, the person must have money (500 pounds a year) and a room where she/he can engage in the work without interruption. She is very persuasive. And she writes well. ( )
  CathyChou | Mar 11, 2022 |
I read this for a non-fiction book club read. I had never read any of V. Woolf's writings and will probably not read any others. I know I am in the extreme minority, but I'm just not into essays and contemplative writing like this. I found it interesting enough to finish it; her thoughts on women were interesting enough, I suppose - quite different. She seemed to be very good at that style of writing, but, like I said, it is not a style that interests/entertains me much. ( )
  Wren73 | Mar 4, 2022 |
Highlights the challenges women writers faced...and continue to face, especially the need for money and space. ( )
  AngelaLam | Feb 8, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 133 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (66 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Woolf, Virginiaprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Aspesi, NataliaIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Beeke, AnthonCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bell, VanessaCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bradshaw, DavidEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Clarke, Stuart N.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Del Serra, MauraTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gordon, MaryForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gubar, SusanEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pearson, DavidCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Simonsuuri, KirstiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stadtlander, BeccaIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stevenson, JulietNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Valentí, HelenaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Waals-Nachenius, C.E. van derTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
This essay is based upon two papers read to the Arts Society at Newnham and the Odtaa at Girton in October 1928. The papers were too long to be read in full, and have since been altered and expanded.
Dedication
First words
But, you may say, we asked you to speak about women and fiction -- what has that got to do with a room of one's own? I will try to explain.
[Foreword (HBJ edition)] Virginia Woolf foresaw with clarity the responses to A Room of One's Own.
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A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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In A Room of One's Own, Virginia Woolf imagines that Shakespeare had a sister: a sister equal to Shakespeare in talent, equal in genius, but whose legacy is radically different.This imaginary woman never writes a word and dies by her own hand, her genius unexpressed. But if only she had found the means to create, urges Woolf, she would have reached the same heights as her immortal sibling. In this classic essay, Virginia Woolf takes on the establishment, using her gift of language to dissect the world around her and give a voice to those who have none. Her message is simple: A woman must have a fixed income and a room of her own in order to have the freedom to create. Annotated and with an introduction by Susan Gubar

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Penguin Australia

4 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141183535, 0141018984, 0141044888, 0734306555

 

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