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The Stand: The Complete and Uncut Edition (1978)

by Stephen King

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
18,983363222 (4.3)2 / 728
Fiction. Horror. Suspense. Thriller. HTML:This is the way the world ends: with a nanosecond of computer error in a Defense Department laboratory and a million casual contacts that form the links in a chain letter of death.
And here is the bleak new world of the day after: a world stripped of its institutions and emptied of 99 percent of its people. A world in which a handful of panicky survivors choose sides‚??or are chosen. A world in which good rides on the frail shoulders of the 108-year-old Mother Abagail‚??and the worst nightmares of evil are embodied in a man with a lethal smile and unspeakable powers: Randall Flagg, the dark man.
In 1978 Stephen King published The Stand, the novel that is now considered to be one of his finest works. But as it was first published, The Stand was incomplete, since more than 150,000 words had been cut from the original manuscript.
Now Stephen King's apocalyptic vision of a world blasted by plague and embroiled in an elemental struggle between good and evil has been restored to its entirety. The Stand : The Complete And Uncut Edition includes more than five hundred pages of material previously deleted, along with new material that King added as he reworked the manuscript for a new generation. It gives us new characters and endows familiar ones with new depths. It has a new beginning and a new ending. What emerges is a gripping work with the scope and moral complexity of a true epic.
For hundreds of thousands of fans who read The Stand in its original version and wanted more, this new edition is Stephen King's gift. And those who are reading The Stand for the first time will discover a triumphant and eerily plausible work of the imagination that takes on the issues that will determine our survival.
Cover artwork ©2020 CBS Interact
… (more)
  1. 243
    The Passage by Justin Cronin (Jacey25, drweb, smiteme)
  2. 151
    Swan Song by Robert R. McCammon (quartzite, infiniteletters, BeckyJG)
    BeckyJG: Dark, detailed tale of post-apocalyptic survivors fighting supernatural evil.
  3. 110
    Nightmares & Dreamscapes by Stephen King (aces)
  4. 101
    The Road by Cormac McCarthy (artturnerjr)
  5. 124
    Cell by Stephen King (jman14)
    jman14: It has been said that Cell is somewhat of a 're-make' of The Stand. It's a good book in my opinion, but The Stand is at least three times better. Good for anyone who likes their gory Apocalypses.
  6. 40
    Watership Down by Richard Adams (sturlington)
    sturlington: Watership Down is referenced in The Stand. They are similar epics about small bands of survivors who go on a long journey to establish a new home.
  7. 52
    Floating Dragon by Peter Straub (quartzite)
  8. 20
    The Fireman by Joe Hill (aethercowboy)
    aethercowboy: Both books cover the subject of the aftermath of a terrible widespread disease.
  9. 1210
    The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien (keremix)
  10. 54
    Earth Abides by George R. Stewart (mamasigs126)
    mamasigs126: Inspiration for King and a wonderful book.
  11. 11
    The Breakers Series: Books 1-3 by Edward W. Robertson (Dragget)
    Dragget: Well thought out post-apocalyptic stories (civilization wiped out by a superbug) plot follows groups of survivors.
  12. 00
    Alas, Babylon by Pat Frank (Curran2)
  13. 33
    Carrion Comfort by Dan Simmons (Scottneumann)
  14. 11
    Ghost Road Blues by Jonathan Maberry (Scottneumann)
  15. 33
    Boy's Life by Robert R. McCammon (Catamount33)
  16. 23
    A Plague Upon Your Family by Mark Tufo (cmwilson101)
    cmwilson101: Epic, apocalyptic cross-country tale with supernatural elements of good v evil
  17. 514
    Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand (missmaddie)
    missmaddie: Epic struggles of good vs. evil
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Group TopicMessagesLast Message 
 Fine Press Forum: The Stand Cemetary Dance17 unread / 17donaldmcobb, March 27
 75 Books Challenge for 2009: Group Read: The Stand58 unread / 58billiejean, October 2009

» See also 728 mentions

English (351)  Dutch (5)  Italian (3)  Spanish (2)  Swedish (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (363)
Showing 1-5 of 351 (next | show all)
One of my favorite books I have ever read. I reread it every few years, because it is so long, but it's just as good as the first time I read it. ( )
  ReneeGreen | Mar 13, 2023 |
I first read The Stand in high school. It was a revelatory experience then, what with its fascinating characters, grotesque horror, and overt fantasy. But revisiting now, over a decade later, has given this book a new color.

Not just because of the pandemic, though the parallels are eerily prescient, but because I understand these characters better than I did when I was fifteen. I understand their motivations, and I am in awe of King's extensive backstory and character work. Even the villains are multidimensional people. That's what made me fall in love with King's work back then, and that's why I still love it now. ( )
  keithlaf | Dec 24, 2022 |

Amazing writing and development, but it was so lengthy that the good bits got lost in a sea of utter crap. Not worth reading. Ending is quite disappointing. I was going to give it two stars for it wasn't that horrible really, but it wasted a lot of my precious time and therefore it gets one star. Nothing more.


Old review (back when it was unfinished):
I finished about half of this book (which is a million pages), and I am suddenly feeling very unmotivated to finish it. Don't get me wrong, Stephen King is a WONDERFUL writer, but the story seemed to drag on and on and on. At times, I felt like I could easily give this book a 5-star rating, and at other times, I felt like throwing it from a 10-story building. If this book was shorter, and if SK wasn't so attached to ALL the crap he writes, and if he believed in deleting CHAPTERS that aren't necessary/important nor related to the plot, then this would have been, indeed, a great book.

I don't want this to stop you from reading it, though. I have a lot of other books I'd like to read before ever continuing reading this. ( )
  womanwoanswers | Dec 23, 2022 |
So this book was crazy, but I loved it. I always have a hard time reading Stephen King because of how descriptive he can be at times and I lose focus. This book did not do that to me at all. I loved all of it. Tom is my favorite character and I had to actually ask my husband and cousin if anything bad was going to happen or I wasn't going to read the book. LOL. (They refused to tell me.) ( )
  LVStrongPuff | Nov 30, 2022 |
This book was very character driven. It was rich with character development for all the main players. The best character in my opinion was Kojack, but I'm a sucker for a dog. I found that the first section and the third section were more my speed. The story was driven forward in leaps and bounds in these sections. The second section was a little flat in terms of action, but deep in terms of character building. The end felt a little lackluster, but very appropriate. ( )
  battlearmanda | Nov 29, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 351 (next | show all)
In short (well, not so short), this is the book that has everything - adventure, romance, prophecy, allegory, satire, fantasy, realism, apocalypse, etc., etc. Even Roger Rabbit gets mentioned. ''The Stand'' does have some great moments and some great lines... But the overall effect is more oppressive than imposing.
 

» Add other authors (20 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
King, Stephenprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Andreasen, Mogens WenzelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bihari, GyörgyTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Castilla, AlbertoCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cayea, JohnCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cortina, LorenzoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dń≥k, Annelies vansecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gardner, GroverNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Goligorsky, EduardoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hagon, GarrickReadersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Horsten, TheoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Körber, JoachimTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kell, ChristineCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Neuhaus, WolfgangÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Soares, GilsonTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
We need help, the Poet reckoned.
--Edward Dorn
Outside the street's on fire In a real death waltz Between what's flesh and what's fantasy And the poets down here Don't write nothing at all They just stand back and let it all be And in the quick of the night They reach for their moment And try to make an honest stand... -- Bruce Springsteen
...And it was clear she couldn't go on, The door was opened and the wind appeared, The candles blew and then disappeared, The curtains flew and then he appeared, Said, "Don't be afraid, Come on, Mary," And she had no fear And she ran to him And they started to fly... She had taken his hand... Come on, Mary, Don't fear the reaper... -- Blue Oyster Cult
Well the deputy walks on hard nails And the preacher rides a mount But nothing really matters much, It's doom alone that counts And the one-eyed undertaker, he blows a futile horn "Come in," she said, "I'll give ya Shelter from the storm." -- Bob Dylan
Dedication
For my wife Tabitha:

This dark chest of wonders.
First words
Hapscomb's Texaco sat on Number 93 just north of Arnette, a pissant four-street burg about 110 miles from Houston.
"Sally."
Quotations
They were standing atop a snowbank nearly nine feet high. Crusted snow sloped steeply down to the bare road below, and to the right was a sign which read simply: Boulder City Limits.
"My life for you!"
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Please do not combine The Stand (1978) with The Stand: The Complete & Uncut Edition (1990). The latter edition contains over 300 pages of new material and includes subplots and characters not included in the 1978 edition.

ISBNs associated with the Uncut version of The Stand include (0340358955, 0340920955, 0340951443, 0385199570, 038552885X, 0450537374, 0451169530, 0451179285, 0517219018, 1568495714, 270961281X, 3404132130, 3404134117, 340425242X, 3404255240, 840149896, 8497599411, 8573027002, 8789918304, 8845212173, 9021005719, 9024545579, and 9127063631)
Publisher's editors
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Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC
Fiction. Horror. Suspense. Thriller. HTML:This is the way the world ends: with a nanosecond of computer error in a Defense Department laboratory and a million casual contacts that form the links in a chain letter of death.
And here is the bleak new world of the day after: a world stripped of its institutions and emptied of 99 percent of its people. A world in which a handful of panicky survivors choose sides‚??or are chosen. A world in which good rides on the frail shoulders of the 108-year-old Mother Abagail‚??and the worst nightmares of evil are embodied in a man with a lethal smile and unspeakable powers: Randall Flagg, the dark man.
In 1978 Stephen King published The Stand, the novel that is now considered to be one of his finest works. But as it was first published, The Stand was incomplete, since more than 150,000 words had been cut from the original manuscript.
Now Stephen King's apocalyptic vision of a world blasted by plague and embroiled in an elemental struggle between good and evil has been restored to its entirety. The Stand : The Complete And Uncut Edition includes more than five hundred pages of material previously deleted, along with new material that King added as he reworked the manuscript for a new generation. It gives us new characters and endows familiar ones with new depths. It has a new beginning and a new ending. What emerges is a gripping work with the scope and moral complexity of a true epic.
For hundreds of thousands of fans who read The Stand in its original version and wanted more, this new edition is Stephen King's gift. And those who are reading The Stand for the first time will discover a triumphant and eerily plausible work of the imagination that takes on the issues that will determine our survival.
Cover artwork ©2020 CBS Interact

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Book description
When a man crashes his car into a petrol station, he brings with him the foul corpses of his wife and daughter. He dies and it doesn't take long for the plague which killed him to spread across America and the world.
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