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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884)

by Mark Twain

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
43,62951740 (3.89)1 / 1346
Classic Literature. Fiction. HTML:

Huckleberry Finn, Tom Sawyer's best friend, escapes down the Mississippi on a raft with the runaway slave, Jim. One of the iconic American novels, it caused a stir when published because of the vernacular used by Twain to characterize Jim and the people of the Mississippi. Twain's criticism of racial segregation and the treatment of slaves was thrown into turbulent criticisms at the turn of the century however, when he himself was accused of racist stereotyping and frequent use of the word "n*gger".

.… (more)
  1. 291
    The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain (becca58203, kxlly)
  2. 204
    To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee (Wraith_Ravenscroft)
  3. 20
    Searching For Jim: Slavery In Sam Clemens's World (Mark Twain and His Circle) by Terrell Dempsey (pechmerle)
    pechmerle: Tremendously enlightening study of the N.E. Missouri social context from which Twain developed the character of Jim.
  4. 20
    Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson (caflores)
  5. 00
    The Life of Lazarillo de Tormes by Anónimo (caflores)
  6. 00
    Kim by Rudyard Kipling (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: Orphaned kid with plenty of street-smarts embarks on a dangerous journey interwoven with high-stakes matters from the adult world (Slavery/Russo-British Espionage).
  7. 01
    Memed, My Hawk by Yaşar Kemal (Eustrabirbeonne)
  8. 01
    Flash for Freedom! by George MacDonald Fraser (ehines)
  9. 68
    The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger (caflores, CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: Disillusioned youth takes off. A liar himself, he despises frauds.
  10. 07
    Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi (ateolf)
  11. 29
    Nigger: The Strange Career of a Troublesome Word by Randall Kennedy (bertilak)
Read (18)
AP Lit (77)
1880s (12)
BitLife (25)
1970s (636)
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» See also 1346 mentions

English (489)  Spanish (9)  German (3)  Dutch (3)  Italian (2)  French (2)  Greek (1)  Slovak (1)  Czech (1)  Danish (1)  Finnish (1)  Norwegian (1)  Catalan (1)  Swedish (1)  All languages (516)
Showing 1-5 of 489 (next | show all)
Rereading since its been years since I last read it and I want to read James next.
Quite the story! ( )
  carolfoisset | Jul 7, 2024 |
Here's what I wrote in 2015 about this read: "Well, finally read this important American novel. Life of the Missipppi was an adventure for a young, independent boy and there's the still unresolved debate about language, slavery, and racism. Glad Hemingway also found the last part about "freeing" Jim as not-so-good :-)" Quotations in the comments section are my exact kindle highlights. ( )
  MGADMJK | Jul 6, 2024 |
Struggled to get to the end ( )
  JosephKing6602 | Jun 11, 2024 |
A Coming-of-Age Story for a Nation

Picking up from the ending of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876), the newly wealthy Huckleberry Finn escapes the chafing rules of civilization imposed by his new adoptive mother, the Widow Douglas, by spending his nights acting out boyish adventures with Tom and their friends. When Huck's abusive, alcoholic Pap kidnaps Huck for his money, Huck fakes his own death and sneaks out on a raft up the Mississippi River, where he encounters Jim, an escaped slave of the Widow's sister, Miss Douglas, and the two have a series of adventures as they try to float up the raft to Illinois and Jim's freedom. Mark Twain constantly juxtaposes the "gentlemanly civilization" of the Antebellum South not only with Huck and Jim's innocent state of nature, but also with Tom's seemingly comparatively harmless romantic fantasies of chivalry and heroism. As witness to the dangers and violence of both fantasies, 13-year-old Huck with his often wistful observations is a stand-in for all of America during the Civil War, making this Great American Novel as much the coming-of-age story of a nation as it is for a boy. In the 21st century, it is appropriate - and important - for school-aged children to read the bowdlerized version (the one with the N-word replaced with the word "slave"), but the original version needs to be available to adults who may - and should - reread it with adult awareness. ( )
  BobbyZim | May 11, 2024 |
I'm reckoning there are so many paths here that they could wind you up when 'temptin to pitch this river tale. What I seed ajumpin out of it all is the black and white truth of lies. Dat Huck, he can make what's not there happen by inventin. Dat old Jim he only take to straight talkin. Dat Tom, he sees things that just aint there and gets mazed; but dat river is time.

I kept quiet with my ears cocked, about fifteen minutes, I reckon. I was floating along, of curse, four or five mile an hour; but you don't ever think of that. No, you feel like you are laying dead still on the water; and, if a little glimpse of a snag slips by, you don't think to yourself how fast you're going, but you catch your breath and think, my! how that snag's tearing along. If you think it ain't dismal and lonesome out in the fog that way, by yourself, in the night, you try it once - you'll see.
( )
  simonpockley | Feb 25, 2024 |
Showing 1-5 of 489 (next | show all)
Mark Twain may be called the Edison of our literature. There is no limit to his inventive genius, and the best proof of its range and originality is found in this book, in which the reader's interest is so strongly enlisted in the fortunes of two boys and a runaway negro that he follows their adventures with keen curiosity, although his common sense tells him that the incidents are as absurd and fantastic in many ways as the "Arabian Nights."
 

» Add other authors (144 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Twain, Markprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Angell, OlavTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Benton, Thomas HartIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brockway, HarryIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cardwell, GuyEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Coveney, PeterEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
DeVoto, BernardIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dietz, NormanNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dove, Eric G.Narratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dufris, WilliamNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Field, RobinNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fiore, Peter M.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fraley, PatrickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Giphart, EmyTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hagon, GarrickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hill, DickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kazin, AlfredAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kemble, Edward W.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Krüger, LoreTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McKay, DonaldIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Minton, HaroldIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Moser, BarryIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Narloch, WilliErzählersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Neilson, KeithPrefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
O'Meally, Robert G.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ribas, MeritxellTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Seelye, JohnIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Smith, Henry NashEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stegner, WallaceIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Swahn, Sven ChristerTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Trier, WalterIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vidal i Tubau, JordiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vogel, NathaëleIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Votaw, Johnsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ward, ColinIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Whittam, GeoffreyIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wood, ElijahNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zwiers, M.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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KOD (13)

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You don't know about me without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; but that ain't no matter.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Wikipedia in English (5)

Classic Literature. Fiction. HTML:

Huckleberry Finn, Tom Sawyer's best friend, escapes down the Mississippi on a raft with the runaway slave, Jim. One of the iconic American novels, it caused a stir when published because of the vernacular used by Twain to characterize Jim and the people of the Mississippi. Twain's criticism of racial segregation and the treatment of slaves was thrown into turbulent criticisms at the turn of the century however, when he himself was accused of racist stereotyping and frequent use of the word "n*gger".

.

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Book description
This is the story of a boy and an escaped slave as they travel down the Mississippi River. it's a story of friendship and family and home.
Haiku summary
Run away from home
Lazy Summer down river
Ignorance ain’t bliss

(readafew)

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Average: (3.89)
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